Dream Of Colleagues | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Colleagues


ARMY OFfiCER

1. One wants to get respect from one’s colleagues.

2. Not a run-of-the-mill person. ... New American Dream Dictionary

Read More...

New American Dream Dictionary

BRASS

1. Change in fortune in the offing.

2. Use caution regarding business affairs, especially where colleagues, perhaps new ones, are concerned.

3. Emotional distance, coldness (as in “brass monkeys”). ... New American Dream Dictionary

Read More...

New American Dream Dictionary

COCK FIGHTING

(Gamecock) Cock fight in a dream means prodding and instigating a dispute between close friends or colleagues, or it could mean provoking enmity between scholars or a dispute between two muezzins who call to prayers in a mosque.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Read More...

Islamic Dream Interpretation

GARDEN

(Flower garden) A garden in a dream means repentance, and repentance from sin in a dream means a garden. Watering one’s garden in a dream means having marital relations.

If one sees his garden dry in a dream, it means that his wife has commenced her menstrual period during which he is not permitted to have sexual intercourse with her. Ifhe sees someone else watering his garden in a dream, it means that such a person will betray him with his wife. Ifone sees himself entering an unknown garden with its trees unattended and its pasture unkempt in a dream, it means distress and worries.

A garden in a dream also represents a woman. Theyboth need water and they both bear fruits or children. In this case, if the garden is interpreted to represent a woman, then its trees and fruits represent her tribe, family and children.

An unknown garden in a dream also represents the Holy Qur’an.

A garden in a dream also represents a marketplace, a new bride’s house, a property, an animal domesticated for service, a shop, a business, a tavern, a bathhouse, generosity, an army made of slaves, cattle or personal assets. Ifone sees himself inside a garden in a dream, it means comfort and growth in his life.lfthe house to which this garden belongs is God’s house, then the man seeing it is in paradise. Ifhe is sick, it means that he will die from his illness and enter that paradise.

If the garden is unknown in the dream, it means martyrdom and particularly ifhe finds inside the garden a womancallinghim to herself, or to drink milk or honeyfrom the garden’s rivers and the same is true if the garden does not look like the ones he is accustomed to see in the world. Otherwise, If one sees himselflooking at a garden, and ifhe is unmarried, it means that he will meet a suitable woman and get married.

If he is married, it means that he will receive joy from his wife equal to that which he received from the garden in his dream.

If one finds within such a garden a group of associates or colleagues, the garden then represents a marketplace.

If one sees a servant or a worker of his urinating inside a well or a stream inside such a garden in the dream, it means that a relative will betray the interests of the family.

A garden whose owner is known in a dream represents a mosque, a park, people of knowledge, ignorant people, the generous ones or the stingy ones. It also represents a meeting place where the rich and the poor, the righteous and the insolent gather.

A garden in a dream also may indicate a religious center, a school, a center for scientific research and studies, a place of worship, etcetera.

If one enters a garden at the season of plucking its fruits in a dream, it means glad tidings, money and increase in one’s good deeds, marriage or children. On the other hand, if he enters a garden in the fall in a dream, it means defamation, indebtedness, divorce, or it could mean loss of a child. Seeing a deceased person in a garden means that he is in paradise.

A garden in a dream also represents a source of nourishment. Its fruits are colorful and their taste ranges from sweet to salty and from sour to bitter.

(Also see House garden; Qur’iin)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Read More...

Islamic Dream Interpretation

ISMAIL

(The prophet Ismail, son of the prophet Abraham, upon both of them be peace.) If one sees him in a dream, it means that he will gain clarity of speech and preside over his colleagues. He also may build a mosque, or participate in such a project. It also means that someone will make a promise and be truthful about fulfilling it. Ifone sees Ismail in a dream, it means that he may suffer at the hands of his father, then God Almighty will relief him from such sufferings or pain.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Read More...

Islamic Dream Interpretation

TRUE INCIDENT

this incident is related to a group of people living on the Island of Saqliyyah .

It is narrated that their king was bent on annihilating the Muslims.

For this, he prepared a powerful navy comprising of thousands of soldiers. At this point he saw a dream in which he saw himself mounted on an elephant while drums were beaten and trumpets were blown before him. When he awoke he summoned some of his clergymen and asked them to interpret the dream. They gave him the glad tiding of victory. He demanded proof from them for their interpretation.

The said that the elephant is the most powerful animal on land and mounting such a powerful animal means becoming the master of power and strength. And the beating of drums and blowings of trumpets are signs of happiness, ecstasy and victory. Also drums are only beaten in the presence of asking if there is some reason for happiness.

When the king heard this, he became both surprised and delighted. He then summoned some Jewish ulama and asked them for their interpretation. They also interpdreted the dream as a glad tiding of victory. He then called some Muslim ulamaa and demanded that they interpret the dream. They all pointed to an experienced aalim to respond to the king’s demand.

The aalim said to the king that he would interpret the dream only if he guaranteed their safety which he did.

The learned aalim interpreted the dream thus; “O king, I see no wisdom in your wanting to kill the Muslims and marching on them for this purpose. Please do not deploy your army for they will not return to you alive. They will be defeated and destroyed. And do not for one moment think that I give this interpretation because I am a Muslim”.

The king asked him for proof to which he replied that the Holy Book of Allah was the source for his proof. He quoted the verse: Have you not seen what your Lord had done to the people of the elephants. He recited the entire Soorah Feel.

The king said: “This is your proof regarding the elephants. What have you to say about the drums?” He recited the verse: And when the trumpet will be blowns, this will be a very hard day for the non-believers-not an easy one.

When the king heard this he became utterly shocked and perplexed since the shaikh’s explanation was rational and irrefutable.

To avoid embarrassment to himself he dismissed the sheikh and his colleagues saying that he would have believed him if he (the sheikh) were not a Muslim. But since he is a Muslim he is biased in his delivery of interpretation.

The Shaikh said: “You will soon find out for yourself, o king!”.

When the sheikh and his colleagues departed the king began to ponder deeply about what the sheikh had said. He became convinced and decided not to go ahead with his plans. When the clergy heard of this they approached him and urged him to go ahead with his plan. They reasoned with him not to believe the interpretation of the sheikh as he was a Muslim and a Muslim would obviously be opposed to king Muslims. They also sought his permission to kill the sheikh which he refused. They continued to incite him against the Muslim and urged him to go ahead with his plans. He had no choice but to accede. He deployed a huge army under the command of his son.

The two sides met in the middle of the sea.

For three days a fierce battle ensued between the Muslims and non-Muslims. One the third day the Christians army was defeated. Not a single person was spared. When the king came to learn about this, he called for the sheikh and admitted his folly before him. He then secretly accepted Islam at his hands and bestowed many of his favours on him.

It is said that he also learned the Holy Qur’aan by the Shaikh and this affair of the king became popular in Saqliyyah.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Read More...

Islamic Dream Interpretation

CREATIVITY AND PROBLEM SOLVING IN DREAMS

Few dreams are, by themselves, problem solving or creative.

The few excep­tions are usually very clear. Example: ‘My mother-in-law died of cancer. I had watched the whole progression of her illness, and was very upset by her death. Shortly after she died the relatives gathered and began to sort through her belongings to share them out. That was the climax of my upset and distress, and I didn’t want any part of this sorting and taking her things. That night I dreamt I was in a room with all the relatives. They were sorting her things, and I felt my waking distress. Then my mother-in-law came into the room. She was very real and seemed happy. She said for me not to be upset as she didn’t at all mind her relatives taking her things. When I woke from the dream all the anxiety and upset had disap­peared. It never returned (told to author dunng a talk given to the Housewives Register in Ilfracombe).

Although in any collection of dreams such clearcut prob­lem solving is fairly rare, nevertheless the basic function in dreams appears to be problem solving.

The proof of this lies in research done in dream withdrawal. As explained in the entry science, sleep and dreams, subjects are woken up as they begin to dream, therefore denying them dreams. This quickly leads to disorientation and breakdown of normal functioning, showing that a lot of problem solving occurs in dreams, even though it may not be as obvious as in the exam­ple. This feature of dreaming can be enhanced to a marked degree by processing dreams and arriving at insights into the information they contain. This enables old problems to be cleared up and new information and attitudes to be brought into use more quickly. Through such active work one be­comes aware of the self, which Carl Jung describes as a cen­tre, but which we might think of as a synthesis of all our experience and being. Gaining insight and allowing the self entrance into our waking affairs, as M L. Von Franz says in Man and His Symbols, gradually produces a wider and more mature personality’ which emerges, and by degrees becomes effective and even visible to others’.

The function of dreams may well be described as an effort on the part of our life process to support, augment and help mature waking consciousness.

A study of dreams suggests that the creative forces which are behind the growth of our body are also inextricably connected with psychological develop­ment. In fact, when the process of physical growth stops, the psychological growth continues.

If this is thwarted in any way, it leads to frustration, physical tension and psychosomatic and eventually physical illness.

The integration of experience.

which dreams are always attempting, if successful cannot help but lead to personal growth. But it is often frozen by the individual avoiding the growing pains’, or the discomfon of breaking through old concepts and beliefs.

Where there is any attempt on the pan of our conscious personality to co-operate with this, the creative aspect of dreaming emerges. In fact anything we are deeply involved in, challenged by or attempting, we will dream about in a creative way. Not only have communities like the American Indians used dreams in this manner—to find better hunting, solve community problems, find a sense of personal life direction— but scientists, writers, designers and thousands of lay people have found very real information in dreams After all, through dreams we have personal use of the greatest computer ever produced in the history of the world—the human brain.

1- In Genesis 41, the story of Pharaoh’s dream is told—the seven fat cows and the seven thin cows. This dream was creative in that, with Joseph’s interpretation, it resolved a national problem where famine followed years of plenty. It may very well be an example of gathered information on the history of Egypt being in the mind of Pharaoh, and the dream putting it together in a problem solving way. See dream process as computer.

2- William Blake dreamt his dead brother showed him a new way of engraving copper. Blake used the method success­fully.

3- Otto Leowi dreamt of how to prove that nervous impulses were chemical rather than electncal. This led to his Nobel prize.

4- Friedrich Kekule tned for years to define the structure of benzene. He dreamt of a snake with its tail in its mouth, and woke to realise this explained the molecular forma­tion of the benzene ring. He was so impressed he urged colleagues, ‘Gentlemen, leam to dream.’

5- Hilprecht had an amazing dream of the connection be­tween two pieces of agate which enabled him to translate an ancient Babylonian inscription.

6- Elias Howe faced the problem of how to produce an effec­tive sewing machine.

The major difficulty was the needle. He dreamt of natives shaking spears with holes in their points. This led to the invention of the Singer sewing ma­chine.

7- Robert Louis Stevenson claims to have dreamt the plot of many of his stories.

8- Albert Einstein said that during adolescence he dreamt he was riding a sledge. It went faster and faster until it reached the speed of light.

The stars began to change into amazing patterns and colours, dazzling and beautiful. His meditation on that dream throughout the years led to the theory of relativity.

To approach our dreams in order to discover their creativity, first decide what problematic or creative aspect of your life needs ‘dream power’. Define what you have already leamt or know about the problem. Write it down, and from this clarify what it is you want more insight into.

If this breaks down into several issues, choose one at a time. Think about the issue and pursue it as much as you can while awake. Read about it, ask people’s opinions, gather information. This is all data for the dream process.

If the question still needs further insight, be­fore going to sleep imagine you are putting the question to your internal store of wisdom, computer, power centre, or whatever image feels right.

For some people an old being who is neither exclusively man nor woman is a working image.

In the morning note down whatever dream you remember. It does not matter if the dream does not appear to deal with the question; Elias Howe’s native spears were an outlandish image, but nevertheless contained the information he needed. Investigate the dream using the techniques given in the entry dream processing. Some problems take time to define, so use the process until there is a resolution.

If it is a major problem, it may take a year or so; after all, some resolutions need re­structuring of the personality, because the problem cannot disappear while we still have the same attitudes and fears. See secret of the universe dreams; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Read More...

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

FALLING

1- To dream of falling shows a lack of confidence in our own ability. We may feel threatened by a lack of security, whether real or imagined. We fear being chopped by friends or colleagues.

2- Falling has come to be interpreted as surrender (particularly sexual) and with moral failure, of not being as one should.

3- We may feci we are slipping away from a situation, essentially we are losing our place. This can be because of others’ negative influence.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Read More...

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

COFFIN

A coffin in a dream may indicate that one may need to embrace death as a natural part of the cycle of life.

A coffin in a dream may also predict a death in the family or in your circle of fnends and colleagues, but it suggests this very rarely. Death in a dream is usually symbolic rather than literal. Thus, a coffin may symbolize the end of a relationship or another important transition In life. It may also indicate that you have lost your enthusiasm for life.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

Read More...

Ariadne's Book of Dream

AD

Vision: In a woman’s dream, an ad may be a warning that, in the interests of others (family, friends, or colleagues), it is high time to make a long-overdue decision; otherwise, a problem may be made public. Reading an ad means you’ll have to make a decision soon. Or vou will receive news in the near future.

Depth Psychology: The ad either indicates skepticism and lack of enterprise or it is a symbol of new opportunities, possibilities, or contacts waiting for you. See Advertising, Learning, Newspaper, Writing.... Dreamers Dictionary

Read More...

Dreamers Dictionary

ASTHMA

Depth Psychology: Dreaming about having an asthma attack needs to be taken seriously. You are either living in a “suffocating” relationship. or your workplace, colleagues, or everyday existence do not give you room to breath. Waste no time finding the reason for this dream!... Dreamers Dictionary

Read More...

Dreamers Dictionary

AXE

Symbol: The axe may appear in dreams as a weapon as well as a tool and it usually means reckless action.

Vision: The axe is a sign of misfortune, usually a fight or a quarrel with people in your environment. You are not always the innocent bystander—particularly when you are the one using the axe. Splitting wood: a separation from your love partner is imminent. Picking up an axe: bad luck. Looking at a very sharp axe: terror and conflict.

Depth Psychology: The axe as a symbol of battle: quarrels or aggression are imminent: or you are not dealing adequately with your own Aggression or Anger. .An axe-dream is often a sign that your influence and authority is only a show and not based on the strength of your character. Working with an axe: you are successful at your job, but you have no consideration for colleagues or other people (you are the perpetrator).

If someone else is working with an axe: you are suffering because of the inconsiderate actions of another person and you need to defend yourself.... Dreamers Dictionary

Read More...

Dreamers Dictionary

HAZELNUTS

Vision: Looking at hazelnuts: right now don’t argue with your neighbors or colleagues. Cracking hazelnuts: it will take a lot of effort on your part to successfully finish a certain task. Eating hazelnuts: make an appointment with your dentist.

Depth Psychology: Nuts are a symbol of difficult problems, but the results—ain a nutshell”—will turn into an asset. Tackle the problem, “crack” the nut!... Dreamers Dictionary

Read More...

Dreamers Dictionary

THIEF

Vision: Watching a thief “at work”: expect an unexpected reward in the near future.

If a thief has stolen something from you: examine the mistrust you harbor for certain colleagues. Dreaming that you stole something: you are feeling overtaxed cither at the job or at home. Being discovered as you are stealing something means disappointment. See Robbery.

Depth Psychology: Behind this symbol are often hidden or unacknowledged desires—including for sexual adventures.

The thief serves as warning to beware of your own foolishness.... Dreamers Dictionary

Read More...

Dreamers Dictionary

TREE

Symbol: An upright structure reaching for the heavens and symbolizing vitality (victory over death), the tree is a symbol of your energies and strengths, ideas, attitudes, and behavior.

Vision: Sitting under a flowering tree means great personal good fortune.

A tree laden with fruit is a sign of a successful life.

A leafless, rotten tree means bad lucL A cut-down tree is a warning of illness or disappointment to come. Climbing a tree means you are overly ambitious, so people may not like you much; you arc making enemies. Falling out of a tree: disappointments and ridicule from your colleagues. Owning a tree (or several): a long life and good health.

Depth Psychology: The tree is the tree of life.

The health, quality, and shape of the dream-tree is an indication of your constitution and vitality.

The tree is not only a symbol of physical energy and strength (including your potential) but also the inner strength that dictates your actions. See Branch.... Dreamers Dictionary

Read More...

Dreamers Dictionary

WAR

Vision: Being ill the midst of a war: you have to face official business, and perseverance is the only way to get through.

If you are taken prisoner: you will meet a powerful adversary who could harm you. Looking at war machinery: extremely difficult times are ahead.

If the war machinery is damaged: your present dilemma is going to ease.

Depth Psychology: Dreaming about war means that you are in a difficult situation: you are fighting with yourself. But the dream may also be an indication that you are “at war” with others— spouses, parents, colleagues, business partners, officials, etc. All these conflicts—the result of unrealistic hopes and/or expectations—will come to an end if you make a firm decision. See Fight.... Dreamers Dictionary

Read More...

Dreamers Dictionary

MARCHING

To dream that you are marching to the beat of music suggests that you work well with others to accomplish goals. It also indicates that you may want to serve your country and display your patriotism. Perhaps you prefer to work for your city or municipal region.

To see people marching in your dream also implies that you are looking to become partners or colleagues with city or municipal officials.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

Read More...

Dream Symbols and Analysis

CASTRATION

Gives gender - specific: Castration in a man’s dream suggests that his sense of self is being attacked. In a woman’s dream she should take care that she is not emasculating her partner or colleagues.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Read More...

Dream Meanings of Versatile

COMMUNE

Material aspects: In dreams a commune may represent any ‘family’ to which we belong – a religion, our work colleagues, a hobby group.

It is the shared passion that is important.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Read More...

Dream Meanings of Versatile

CONSERVATION

Material aspects: As the issue becomes more noticeable in everyday life conservation can have two meanings. On a personal level it can represent the best use of our talents and abilities. In a wider sense it will suggest our responsibilities towards others – family, colleagues and others.

To dream of working for an organization dealing with conservation may mean that we should seek out others of a like mind.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Read More...

Dream Meanings of Versatile

COVEN

Material aspects: The popular image of a coven of witches can appear in dreams when relationships with work colleagues or family require a common focus.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Read More...

Dream Meanings of Versatile

EQUAL / EQUALITY

Material aspects: Any dream of equality can highlight our relationships with siblings or with work colleagues. We may have issues that cannot be properly dealt with in waking life, and therefore our mind will try to resolve these concerns through dreams.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Read More...

Dream Meanings of Versatile

FALL / FALLING

Material aspects: A fall in a dream outlines the need to be grounded, to take care within a known situation. We may be harmed by being too pedestrian.

To dream of falling shows a lack of confidence in our own ability. We may feel threatened by a lack of security, whether real or imagined. We fear being dropped by friends or colleagues.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Read More...

Dream Meanings of Versatile

HAREM

Material aspects: In a work situation a group of female colleagues can bond in a way that gives the appearance of a harem. While bowing to authority, there is also a connection between the women that gives a degree of solidarity.

Dreaming of a harem can give information that helps to deal with the dynamics of the relationships.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Read More...

Dream Meanings of Versatile

AIR

If the air is clear and sunny, success lies ahead.

If the air is cloudy, foggy, misty, or stormy, then you’re not in a clear frame of mind. Perhaps you should postpone making important decisions for a few days.

Pumping air into a tire or air mattress implies that your support system (family, friends, colleagues) is weak and needs to be strengthened.... Dream Explanations of Astro Center

Read More...

Dream Explanations of Astro Center

CURSE

You are in danger of losing the respect of friends and/or colleagues if you uttered curses in your dream. Curb your temper and impulsive actions. However, if the curses were directed at you, a rise in social status through new and influ- ential friends may be ex- pected.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

Read More...

The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

PROBLEMS

To cut your own hair, or have it cut, is a sign of success in a new venture or sphere of activity.

To cut someone else’s hair is a warning of hidden jealousy around you.

A dream of braiding your hair predicts the forging of a new link of friendship, but to braid someone else’s hair portends an unhappy argument Curling or setting your hair pertains to em- tional affairs and promises either an improvement in your marital relations or a new romance.

Bleaching your hair suggests you would be wise to be somewhat less flirtatious, and dyeing it suggests that you are allowing vanity to overcome your common sense.

Having your hair pulled indicates untrustworthy friends or colleagues, and gray or white hair predicts sad (but not grievous) news.

To put brilliantine (or similar treatment) on your hair to slick it down smoothly is a forerunner of brightening prospects and/or advancement in status; to have your hair done by a hairdresser is a warning against repeating gossip.

Eating or chewing hair signifies that you would be well advised to give more attention to your own affairs and less to the affairs of others.

To find hair on some unusual part of your body promises a steady increase in material wealth.

See also Beard and Wig(s).... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

Read More...

The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

MINNOWS

Pleasing recognition from your colleagues is forecast in a dream of using minnows for bait, but success with the opposite sex is predicted if you caught them in your hands.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

Read More...

The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

PURGE

To dream of a political purge suggests you may be called on to arbitrate in a dispute between friends or colleagues.

Try to avoid the Solomon bit or you are likely to end up backbitten.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

Read More...

The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

KARAOKE

Being at a karaoke bar and not singing means the dreamer wants to establish more open and spontaneous relationships with others, but is too timid. On the contrary, to see yourself singing is a sign that you desire such an exaggerated starring role that you run the risk of alienating those around you from imposing your opinions. (See SINGING)

Karaoke

analysis of a dream

Rosa dreamed: “We were celebrating my birthday in a karaoke bar. At first I didn’t want to go up to sing. I know that I’m bad at it, so I was very embarrassed to go off key and that everyone would laugh at me. But my friends insisted so much that finally I felt I had to. After all, everyone was there for me. By luck, I could chose my favorite song and I began to sing the there for me. By luck, I could chose my favorite song and I began to sing the first lines and I did it really well! People clapped enthusiastically, while I followed the lyrics on the screen. I surprised myself with my voice. I was signing a really tough Mariah Carey song and I did it better than her!”

When Rosa had this dream she was very worried about an important business meeting she had scheduled the following week. She hadn’t worked at the company very long and she was worried what her bosses and colleagues would think of her. The fact that she didn’t want to sing in karaoke reveals her fear of public speaking and being judged; however, her unconscious was calming her and encouraging her to do her best.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Read More...

The Big Dictionary of Dreams

NUDITY

This dream has an ambivalent sense. On one hand, it is a symbol of physical beauty, purity, and divinity (in fact, goddesses like Venus or Diana have always been painted naked); and it reflects a desire for freedom, sincerity, and self-improvement. On the other hand, it represents lust or vain exhibitionism.

If in the dream you feel distressed or embarrassed it means that you reject your own body.

If you see other people naked it can reveal both a desire to know their secret thoughts or a mere sexual attraction. When you find yourself naked in public it denotes anxiety, fear of ridicule, emotional vulnerability, and low self-confidence. You are afraid that others may hurt you if you act spontaneously or make a mistake. Nudity, finally, also means that you feel nostalgia for lost childhood. It represents your true self, without norms or social constraints.

Formerly, mothers used to warn her daughters that if they dreamed of being naked they would soon learn about a scandal. According to some oracles, it predicts that you will make serious mistakes in business affairs, unless you listen to the advice of others. For gypsies, however, this dream brings good luck, especially if the oneiric scene is developed under a starry sky. In general, this dream can also mean innocence.

NUDITY

analysis of a dream

Mary dreamed: “I was in the office when I realized I was not quite dressed. I had forgotten to put pants on and was not wearing underwear! I tried to get my jersey down so it would cover me but it was too short. I felt really bad, insecure, and helpless. However, my colleagues—all perfectly dressed—did not seem to notice anything. At that time my boss called me to come to his office and I could no longer resist; I burst into tears like a little girl. Seeing me so crushed, Ana (a partner) offered me a jacket so I could tie it around my waist, but she said, ‘Girl, I do not know what’s wrong with you lately, but you get too easily distracted... ’ and continued her work without caring much about my situation. Then I woke up.”

Almost everyone has dreamed of being naked—or half-dressed—in a public place. This dream is often associated with sexuality (with a sexual inadequacy or guilt); but also with the fear of somehow “being exposed,” regarding your private or professional life. However, depending on the circumstances of each person, the meaning varies. In Mary’s case, it reflects her vulnerability at the workplace and a concern for revealing some deficiency or inability to others. In the dream, peers do not seem to notice—or do not pay attention to—her nudity, and that is a reassuring element indicating that perhaps Mary was worried for no reason. Failure to wear trousers and the fear that a figure of authority—such as her boss —would find out reveals her concern for success and professional skills; they could be questioned.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Read More...

The Big Dictionary of Dreams

CAKES

Cakes often signify a time to rejoice at one’s accomplishments or to celebrate new relationships or work efforts that have been successful and have sometimes gone unnoticed by the dreamer, family, friends, or colleagues.... Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

Read More...

Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

THE PERSONA

In your dreams are you wearing a disguise or mask? Are you a regal persona or did you become a superhero? Are you using cosmetics or wearing a wig? Are you worried about your appearance in some way? Are you naked? Are your clothes torn and ragged? If so, this kind of dream concerns your persona or personas, as we all have more than one.

The persona represents your public image, the part of yourself that is presented externally by what you say, wear and look like. The word is obviously related to the words ‘person’ and ‘personality’, and comes from the Latin word for mask. So the persona is the mask you put on before you show yourself to the outside world.

Your persona’s wardrobe of masks comprises the various faces you use to present yourself to different audiences in waking life—for example, your family, friends, colleagues and strangers. We wear these masks to help us relate better to different groups of people, but these masks are not the real you. Depending on the context of your dream and how you felt, your unconscious may be warning you that one of your personas is in conflict with your true self, or that you need to adopt a different persona to achieve your goals.

The persona is rarely personified in a dream. It is usually a dream theme, rather than a dream figure: for example, the persona can be said to be present in a dream in which your clothes are stained, or you are naked or inappropriately dressed. At its best, the persona is just the ‘good impression’ you wish to present as you fill the roles society requires of you. But, of course, it can also be the ‘false impression’ you use to manipulate people’s opinions and behaviors.

And, at its worst, it can be mistaken, even by yourself, for your own true nature; sometimes we believe we really are what we pretend to be!... The Element Encyclopedia

Read More...

The Element Encyclopedia

ORCHESTRA

If an orchestra or musical concert figures in your dreams, it refers to those aspects of your personality that must work together with one another in order for you to function properly. Such dreams suggest ways for you to bring all these aspects of yourself together to create a balanced whole.

If you orchestrate something, this means you make it happen and this dream may also be urging you to take action in your waking life.

If you find yourself conducting an orchestra, this means that you need to take control, but are you creating sweet music or disharmony? If you are a member of an orchestra, you are a vital part of a greater task. Are you in or out of tune? This could refer to your waking life, in which you might be blending in harmoniously with friends and colleagues, or conflicting with them.... The Element Encyclopedia

Read More...

The Element Encyclopedia

CASTLE / CITADEL / FORTRESS

If you dream of any of these, it suggests a defensive attitude. Do you have a real fear of being overwhelmed or defeated by a group of schoolmates or colleagues?

Or are you feeling so vulnerable that you are putting up emotional defenses to protect yourself? The symbol of the castle is that of a place where you can defend yourself from attack, so it may represent the methods you use to protect yourself from ‘attack’. On the other hand, your dream may highlight your self- imposed isolation from others, and the sense of security you get from being self- reliant.

If your stronghold came under siege, did you identify the faces of your attackers? Are these people you know in waking life? And did your dream defenses hold firm? If they did, this suggests that you are successfully fending off attempts to wound or get through to your emotions.

If you are a man who dreamed that you are laying siege to a castle, the Freudian interpretation is that it expresses your desire to have sex with a woman who has resisted your advances. The castle is also a place of historical interest, so it may suggest a need to look to the past for inspiration. It can also represent a mandala, a symmetrical pattern that symbolizes the psyche.

If a courtyard or moat appears in the dream, this again refers to protection or the desire to feel safe and secure. The shape of the moat or courtyard will also be relevant.... The Element Encyclopedia

Read More...

The Element Encyclopedia

FIRE

The elements often have important roles in disaster dreams. In a dream, fire can be a purifying influence, it can relate to anger, or it might be suggestive of destruction. It may also relate to the fact that you are being consumed by a passion in waking life. In any event, its appearance in your dream may suggest that something in your life (most likely related to work or home) is in the midst of considerable change. Such a dream may be a warning—especially if you are trying unsuccessfully to smother the flames. The dream would be reassuring if a house or room was catching fire and you could control the flames, for here is a symbol of controlled passion. The dream is reassuring you that you are, or can be, in control of your life.

Disaster dreams in which you see people engulfed in a burning building should make you consider both your reaction and your personal connection with the disaster—if any.

If you are merely a spectator in the dream, too scared to move or offer your help, you should ask yourself whether you are equally fearful of life, or whether you are less forceful than you need to be.

If any of your friends, colleagues or family members are trapped in the building and you know you should help them, your dream may be telling you to take a more active part in their lives.

If you dreamed that you were in the burning building or that the building was falling down around you, consider whether your life is also collapsing around you. To dream of being burned alive may express your fears of a new relationship or phase of life. Finally if you are fire-fighting in your dream, this is a positive sign as it shows you are putting up a fight in real life.... The Element Encyclopedia

Read More...

The Element Encyclopedia

ORPHANED / ADOPTED / FOSTERED

If you dream of being an orphaned, adopted or fostered child, this usually suggests that your relationships with members of your family in waking life have created some sense of loss and rejection in you. Dreaming of having lost your parents or being rejected by your parents so you become an orphan, adopted or fostered child may denote that you feel you didn’t get their unconditional love and attention, and that you have to find your own way in the world without their support. Alternatively you may feel as if you are an outsider in the relationship to your family. Perhaps you have been excluded or perhaps you have little in common with them. Do you consider yourself rejected or at odds with the rest of your family? Whatever the reason, your dream may be suggesting to you that you need to create a surrogate family to get the support you need; this may be with your friends or your partner, and they will be able to help you feel loved, secure and accepted for who you are.

Another explanation of such dreams is that it is time for you to be more independent and self-reliant by moving away from your parents. When life forces you into permanently or temporarily losing your parents, either by death or by other circumstances such as foreign travel, you may experience dreams of being orphaned. The dream might not refer to your relationship with your family at all, but might be telling you that you are feeling abandoned, unloved, rejected and misunderstood by your partner, friends or colleagues in waking life.

If this is the case, the dream connects to feelings of belonging or not belonging in waking life.

If you are looking after an orphan in your dream, you are attempting to heal that part of you that feels unloved.... The Element Encyclopedia

Read More...

The Element Encyclopedia

GATHERINGS

Groups or gatherings of people in a dream usually depict how you relate to other people in waking life.

According to a Jungian interpretation, social gatherings suggest different aspects of yourself in waking life. In all large gatherings of people there is usually a strong emotional charge of either good feelings and generosity of spirit, or tension, conflict and stress.

If you find yourself part of a gathering in your dream, you can begin your interpretation by considering the basic atmosphere and feeling of the occasion.

Whether you are celebrating a special occasion in your dream, catching up with friends or colleagues or being bustled along in a busy, crowded street, the people who surround you, your reaction to them, their reaction to you and the events that occurred in the dream all suggest your personal likes and dislikes.

These preferences refer to the people with whom you mix, to your self-perceived status within your family, social and professional life, as well as to your self- confidence, insecurity and individuality. Bear in mind that such dreams can also be full of surprises; you may find the people or yourself in your dream gatherings behaving out of character.

If you are confused about the meaning of your dream, this chapter is designed to help; but you may also find it useful to refer to the chapters on FAMILY, PEOPLE and RELATIONSHIPS.... The Element Encyclopedia

Read More...

The Element Encyclopedia

CONFERENCE / CONVENTION

If your dream contained images of conferences or conventions, your unconscious may be suggesting that you listen to the opinions of other people and become more open-minded.

If you were speaking at such a gathering, pay attention to the reaction of the audience as it will indicate how well other people are reacting to you in real life. For example, if the audience walked out or fell asleep, this is a negative sign. If, however, they applauded you at a public meeting, this may symbolize a breakthrough or recognition in some area of your waking life.

If you stuttered your way through a speech or left the stage feeling humiliated, your unconscious was probably reflecting your anxiety about your work performance or a future event at which you are obliged to speak in waking life.

MEETING

If your unconscious calls a dream meeting with the people with whom you work in waking life, it may be commenting on your relationship with them. You may find in such dreams that work colleagues or bosses behave out of character; for example, a timid colleague is loud and aggressive or a supportive boss becomes a tyrant; if this is the case, your unconscious could have been warning you to watch out for these people as they may not be what they seem in waking life. To dream that you are attending a reception suggests the possibility of, or desire for, pleasant engagements and social gatherings.

Clubs, Groups and Crowds... The Element Encyclopedia

Read More...

The Element Encyclopedia

TEAM GAME

Most dreams in which you are playing a team game reflect how well you feel you are performing within a group situation in waking life, whether it is among your family and friends, or—more typically—in relation to colleagues at work. So if you dreamed of playing football, basketball, hockey, netball, rugby or volleyball, pay attention to how you are reacting or playing in the team. Are you the weak link? Are you lazy? Are you the one who pulls the team together? Are you a good sport? Do you play fairly, or do you cheat and break the rules? Do you respect authority and the decision of the referee or judges? Are you a team player or only concerned about your own performance? The answer to questions such as these will prove helpful if they are considered in the context of your participation in group dynamics in waking life.

Dreams that feature baseball can be littered with sexual symbols such as the bat, the ball and the gloves. According to Freudians, such dreams—and this would be true of all games containing umpires or referees—might be an oblique reference to a challenge you have made to a father figure, as represented by the umpire. The white outfits worn in the game of cricket may suggest a yearning for childhood innocence; the friendly, relaxed and languid nature of the game might reveal a longing to withdraw from a fiercely competitive environment, whether at home or at work. The intense passions of football, whether in the form of rugby, soccer or gridiron, may symbolize sexual excitement; scoring a goal or a try, for example, might symbolize orgasm. Jungians, however, would see dream football as a mirror of the dreamer’s spiritual aspirations. Some team sports seem unlikely topics for a dream but your dreaming mind may select them specifically for their symbolism. To dream that you are part of a rowing team, for example, stresses the importance of collective effort and pulling together as a team.... The Element Encyclopedia

Read More...

The Element Encyclopedia

DEBT / BANKRUPTCY

Dreams in which you are bankrupt or heavily in debt may reflect real-life financial concerns but there are other explanations which have little to do with money. A dream debt may, for example, be a debt of gratitude that you need to pay to someone. Is there someone to whom you feel indebted? Dreams of going bankrupt or ending up in poverty often refer to the loss of personal qualities rather than to financial disaster. Ask yourself what your lost finances could symbolize: the love of your partner, for example, the respect of your colleagues at work or your own physical energy. Whatever it is you have lost, your dreaming mind is urging you to take the appropriate steps to prevent a breakdown or crash in your waking life. See also MONEY AND SHOPPING.... The Element Encyclopedia

Read More...

The Element Encyclopedia

WORKPLACE

Schools, colleges, universities and the workplace have much in common. They are all centers of learning, anxiety and ambition, and places where people interact and learn from each other. This is why the unconscious may use them as interchangeable dream metaphors. Your boss may appear in your dream as a teacher, or colleagues may appear in the guise of school friends or classmates. So if a dream places you in a workplace, remember to look for any links with school scenarios.

If your dream featured your actual workplace and colleagues you work with everyday, it may have been highlighting your preoccupation with your job. It may also have been trying to draw your attention to a specific aspect of your job. You spend much of your time at work, so work is of considerable importance emotionally.

If you are comfortable at work, dreams of the workplace and the people with whom you work may become symbols of reassurance and reward; but if you are not comfortable at work, they can become symbols of frustration.

If you had a dream in which you were performing mindless repetitive tasks on an assembly line, perhaps you feel as if you are being treated like a mindless automaton in waking life or that others are making relentless demands on you. Or do you feel that you are losing your sense of identity in your job or that people in your life are taking you for granted?... The Element Encyclopedia

Read More...

The Element Encyclopedia

SIGMUND FREUD ON DREAMS

Sigmund Freud actually called dreams the “royal road to the unconscious,” That statement will probably remain true in psychology forever. Freud’s classic text, The Interpretation of Dreams, contains some of his finest work.

Freud believed every dream is a wish fulfillment, and he kept this theory to the end, even though he gave up his initial idea that all dreams have a sexual content.

For Freud, the concept of wish fulfillment didn’t necessarily imply that a pleasure was sought, because a person could just as well have a wish to be punished. Nevertheless, this idea of a “secret” wish being masked by a dream remains central to classical Freudian psychoanalysis.

Freud said, “Dreams are not comparable to the spontaneous sounds made by a musical instrument struck rather by some external force than by the hand of a performer; they are not meaningless, not absurd, they do not imply that one portion of our stockpile of ideas sleeps while another begins to awaken. They are a completely valid psychological phenomenon, specifically the fulfillment of wishes; they can be classified in the continuity of comprehensible waking mental states; they are constructed through highly complicated intellectual activity.”

It was not until Freud noticed how allowing his patients to freely associate ideas with whatever came to mind, that he really explored spontaneous abreaction. Freud himself suffered bouts of deep anxiety, and it was partly this that led him to explore the connection between association of ideas and dreams. In 1897 he wrote to his friend Wilhelm Fliess:

‘No matter what I start with, I always find myself back again with the neuroses and the psychical apparatus. Inside me there is a seething ferment, and I am only waiting for the next surge forward. I have felt impelled to start writing about dreams, with which I feel on firm ground.’

This move toward dreams may have come about because in allowing his patients freedom to talk and explore the associations that arose - free association - Freud noticed that patients would often find a connection between the direction of their associations and a dream they had experienced. The more he allowed his patients to go in their own direction, the more frequently they mentioned their dreams. Also, talking about the dream often enabled the patient to discover a new and productive chain of associations and memories.

Freud began to take note of his own dreams and explore the associations they aroused. In doing so he was the first person to consciously and consistently explore a dream into its depths through uncovering and following obvious and hidden associations and emotions connected with the dream imagery and drama.

Obviously previous dream researchers had noticed how the dream image associated with personal concerns, but Freud broke through into seeing the connection with sexual feelings, with early childhood trauma, and with the subtleties of the human psyche. He did this to deal with his own neurosis, and he says of this period, ‘I have been through some kind of neurotic experience, with odd states of mind not intelligible to consciousness, cloudy thoughts and veiled doubts, with barely here and there a ray of light.’

Using dreams for his self analysis, Freud discovered that previously unremembered details from his childhood were recaptured along with feelings and states of mind which he had never met before.

He wrote of this period, “Some sad secrets of life are being traced back to their first roots; the humble origins of much pride and precedence are being laid bare. I am now experiencing myself all the things that, as a third party, Ihave witnessed going on in my patients, days when I slink about depressed because I have understood nothing of the day’s dreams, fantasies, or mood.”

Without this powerful and personal experience of working with his dreams, meeting emotions and fantasies welling up from the unconscious, Freud would not have so passionately believed in his theories regarding dreams and the unconscious.

Of course, like much of Freud’s theories, he related dreams to sex. One of his basic views of dreams was that the purpose of dreams is to allow us to satisfy in fantasies the instinctual urges that society judges unacceptable such as sexual practices. This was partly the reason for the enormous opposition and criticism that he met.

During the period of his early life, only men were believed to have powerful sexual urges. When Freud showed that repressed but obvious sexual desires were equally at work in women this created a social uproar. Perhaps his second finding in regard to sexuality surprised even him. During his analysis of women patients, sexual advance or assault by the woman’s father was often revealed.

Freud struggled with this, wondering whether the assault was memory of an actual event, or a psychic reproduction of it. He eventually came to the conclusion that hysterical and neurotic behavior was often due to the trauma caused by an early sexual assault by the parent. Where there was not evidence of physical assault, then he saw the neurosis as due to sexual conflict or a trauma caused by some other event. This conflict was often manifested through dreams. This led to Freud being rejected by university colleagues, fellow doctors, and even by patients.

Another expert in the field of dreams and dream interpretation was Carl Jung.... Dreampedia

Read More...

Dreampedia

INTERPRETING YOUR DREAMS

“If the dream is a translation of waking life, waking life is also a translation of the dream.”
René Magritte

If you have ever wondered why dreams often appear so difficult to make sense of, it is because the information they contain is presented in a different language; the language of symbols: of people alive or dead, known and unknown, animals both domestic and wild, landscapes and buildings familiar and strange, or any number of symbolic objects such as shapes, colors, signs, numbers, jewelry, food, clothing and so on.

These images are your own thoughts, feelings and ideas turned into a series of pictures like ordinary scenes in your daily life. For example, if you feel overwhelmed you may have a dream you are swimming but finding it hard to keep your head above water. If you feel confused you may have a dream when you are wondering about lost in a dark forest. The number of symbols and images that your mind can translate into dream pictures is practically endless.

Words just can’t convey the countless powerful feelings that symbols do. These symbols are often chosen from something that has caught our attention in waking life, triggering a memory, conflict or concern that resonates both in the present and in the past.

One tried-and-tested way to uncover the meaning of your dream images is by direct association. You simply go with the first thing that pops into your head when a trigger image from your dream is given. If you don’t immediately get an associative thought, try working through all your feelings about that image. For example, if you saw a caterpillar in a dream. Do you like caterpillars or do you find them a bit creepy? Try to discover what the image means to you right now, for the meanings of your symbols will change over time.

The more you work with your dreams, the more familiar you will become with your personal images. You’ll probably find that you dream the most about the things that you are familiar with every day: your family, your colleagues, your friends and your pet. Each time you dream about these familiar things they will have personal significance to you alone.

The great majority of dreams are not to be taken literally and you need to do a bit of detective work to get to the real message. Just because you dream that a friend is dying does not mean that he or she will die, but rather that they are going through a period of enormous change. In fact, interpreting dreams literally can be harmful. As pointed out earlier, you have your own set of unique dream images and symbols. If you love dogs, what a dog means to you and what a dog means to someone who can’t stand dogs will be very different. Always bear in mind that your dream symbols and images are unique to you.

Although the images and symbols in your dreams do need to be interpreted, their purpose isn’t to mystify you. They are simply trying to get their message across in the best way that they can. If you do find yourself getting tense, confused or frustrated when trying to interpret a dream, let it go. Dream interpretation is best approached with an open mind and in a relaxed state.

You don’t need to interpret every single dream you have. In the same way that some movies are more compelling and thoughtprovoking than others, some dreams, like those when you do fantastic things like flying into space or surfing in Hawaii, are simply to be enjoyed. You don’t always have to dig deep for meaning. It’s good to be aware that a dream might contain a message of importance, but don’t get obsessed with finding meanings for every single detail —just interpret what you can. Dreams, like life, are full of big and little stuff. Don’t sweat the ‘small stuff’.... Dreampedia

Read More...

Dreampedia

WHAT DREAMS CAN DO FOR YOU

Your dream world is an invisible but extremely powerful inner resouce, one that you can learn to access freely. You can learn to command and control your dreams, thereby enriching your life immeasurably.

Once upon a time not so long ago, an inventor was struggling with a major problem. His name was Elias Howe, and for years he had been trying to solve this problem, so that he could complete a machine he was building—a machine that would in time change the world. He was missing a small but vital detail, and, try as he would, he just couldn’t figure it out. Needless to say, Howe was a very frustrated man. One night, after another long day of fruitless work on his project, he dreamed he had been captured by fierce savages. These warriors were attacking him with spears. Although in the dream he was terrified he would be killed, he noticed that the spears were unusual looking: each one had an eye- shaped hole at the pointed end. When Howe woke up, it hit him like a brick: he had actually dreamed the answer to his problem. His nightmare was a blessing in disguise. He immediately saw that the eye of the spear could be an eye in a sewing needle, near its point. Elated with the discovery, he rushed to his laboratory and finished the design of his invention: the sewing machine. The rest, as they say, is history.

The list of what dreams can do for you seems endless. We’ve touched on a few of these benefits of dreaming in the preface and introduction. Now let’s go into a bit more detail. I want you to get really excited about your own dream potential. And, once you realize the possibilities, I think you will.

FAMOUS DREAMERS

The history of dreams is filled with stories of famous people who have called on their dreams for help, or who have received help unexpectedly from their dreams. Here are a few more interesting stories to illustrate the point:

The physicist Niels Bohr, who developed the theory of the movements of electrons, had a dream in which he saw the planets attached to the sun by strings. This image inspired him to finalize his theory.

The great Albert Einstein reported that the famous theory of relativity came to him while he was napping—a good reason for taking frequent naps!

Author Richard Bach, who wrote the bestseller Jonathan Livingston Seagull, was stuck in a writer’s block after writing the first half of his now-famous novel. It was eight years later that he literally dreamed the second half and was able to complete his book.

Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman told reporters that his classic film Cries and Whispers had been inspired by a dream.

Another writer, the well-loved British author Robert Louis Stevenson, was quite dependent on his dreams for ideas that he could turn into sellable stories. Stevenson has related in his memoirs that after a childhood tortured by nightmares, and his successful efforts to overcome them, he was able to put his dreams to work for profit.

A born storyteller (though he started out as a medical student), he was accustomed to lull himself to sleep by making up stories to amuse himself. Eventually, he turned this personal hobby into a profession, becoming a writer of tales like Treasure Island. He identified his dream-helpers as “little people,” or “Brownies.” Once he was in constant contact with this inner source, his nightmares vanished, never to return. Instead, whenever he was in need of income he turned to his dreams:

At once the little people begin to bestir themselves in the same quest, and labour all night long, and all night long set before him truncheons of tales upon their lighted theatre. No fear of his being frightened now; the flying heart and the frozen scalp are things bygone; applause, growing applause, growing interest, growing exultation in his own cleverness . . . and at last a jubilant leap to wakefulness, with the cry, “I have it, that’ll do!”

Stevenson wrote his autobiography in the third person, not revealing that he was the subject until the end.

Stevenson further states that sometimes when he examined the story his Brownies had provided, he was disappointed, finding it unmarketable. However, he also reported that the Brownies “did him honest service and gave him better tales than he could fashion for himself,” that “they can tell him a story piece by piece, like a serial, and keep him all the while in ignorance of where they aim.”

Stevenson’s Brownies are a perfect example of dream helpers just waiting to be called upon. A particularly famous example of the work of Stevenson’s Brownies is the tale The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. As he explains:

I had long been trying to write a story on this subject, to find a body, a vehicle, for that strong sense of man’s double being, which must at times come in upon and overwhelm the mind of every thinking creature. [After he destroyed an earlier version of the manuscript . . .] For two days I went about racking my brains for a plot of any sort; and on the second night I dreamed the scene at the window, and a scene afterwards split in two, in which Hyde, pursued for some crime, took the powder and underwent the change in the presence of his pursuers. All the rest was made awake, and consciously, although I think I can trace in much of it the manner of my Brownies.

Although Stevenson did the “mechanical work, which is about the worst of it,” writing out the tales with pen and paper, mailing off the stories to publishers, paying the postage, and not incidentally collecting the fees, he gave his Brownies almost total credit for his productions.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, a British poet, was accustomed to taking a sedative derived from opium (legal in those days). One afternoon after taking a dose he was reading and fell asleep over his book. The last words he read had been, “Here the Khan Kubla commanded a palace to be built.” When Coleridge awoke some three hours later he had dreamed hundreds of lines of poetry, which he immediately set to writing down. The opening lines of this poem—one of the most famous of all time—are:

  • In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
    A stately pleasure-dome decree:
    Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
    Through caverns measureless to man
    Down to a sunless sea.

Unfortunately for posterity, after writing only fifty-four lines of the two to three hundred he had dreamed, Coleridge was interrupted by a caller, whom he entertained for an hour. When he returned to complete the poem, he had lost all the rest of what he had dreamed! In his diary he noted that it had disappeared “like images on the surface of a stream.” Even so, he had written a masterpiece. This true story, however, emphasizes the need to record dreams upon awakening, a subject we will take up in chapters 5 and 6.

Not only artists and writers give their dreams credit for their ideas and inspirations, but many scientists as well (as we saw in the examples of Bohr and Einstein). Psychologist Eliot D. Hutchinson reports numerous cases of scientists receiving information through dreams and says of dreams that “by them we can see more clearly the specific mechanism of intuitive thought,” and that “a large number of thinkers with whom I have had direct contact admit that they dream more or less constantly about their work, especially if it is exceptionally baffling . . . they often extract useful conceptions.”

I personally can attest to this statement, as it mirrors my own experience writing books. For example, when I began work on this book about dreams, I noticed that my dream production immediately doubled; and I have had Stevenson’s experience of “little people,” whom I call my “elves,” and whom I write about extensively in my book for teens called Teen Astrology, telling about how they came to my rescue when I was quite stuck (see chapter 9, pages 249– 252 in that book).

One of the most astonishing as well as fascinating stories is that of Hermann V. Hilprecht, a professor of Assyrian at the University of Pennsylvania in the late 1800s. It seems to be a characteristic of those who receive dream help that they have recently been working long and hard and are frustrated. In Hilprecht’s case, he was working late one evening in 1893, attempting to decipher the cuneiform characters on drawings of two small fragments of agate. He thought they belonged to Babylonian finger rings, and he had tentatively assigned one fragment to the so-called Cassite period of 1700 B.C.E. However, he couldn’t classify the second fragment. And he wasn’t at all sure about the first either. He finally gave up his efforts at about midnight and went straight to bed—and had the following dream, which was his “astounding discovery.”

Hilprecht dreamed of a priest of pre-Christian Nippur, several thousand years ago, who led the professor into the treasure chamber of the temple and showed him the originals, telling him just how the fragments fitted in, all in great detail. Although the dream was long and involved, Hilprecht remembered it all and in the morning told it to his wife. In his words: “Next morning . . . I examined the fragments once more in the light of these disclosures, and to my astonishment found all the details of the dream precisely verified in so far as the means of verification were in my hands.”

Up until then, Hilprecht had been working only with drawings. Now he traveled to the museum in Constantinople where the actual agate fragments were kept and discovered that they fitted together perfectly, unlocking the secret of a three-thousand-year-old mystery by means of a dream!

How did this happen? Clairvoyance? Magic? Who was the priest? How was it that Hilprecht seemed to make contact in a dream with someone who had lived so long before him? We will never know the answers to these questions; but we do know from the professor’s own words that this is exactly what happened to him. (It makes you wonder whether Professor Hilprecht was in the habit of paying attention to his dreams!)

No doubt one of the most famous dream sources of scientific discovery was experienced by the German chemist Friedrich August Kekulé, when he was attempting to understand and model the molecular structure of benzene. Like Professor Hilprecht, Kekulé had been searching for the answer for many years and was totally immersed in the problem. He told of a dream he had while he napped in front of his fireplace one frigid night in 1865:

Again the atoms were juggling before my eyes:
My mind’s eye, sharpened by repeated sights of a similar kind, could not distinguish larger structures of different forms and in long chains, many of them close together; everything was moving in a snake-like and twisting manner. Suddenly, what was this? One of the snakes got hold of its own tail and the whole structure was mockingly twisting in front of my eyes. As if struck by lightning, I awoke.

This dream led Kekulé directly to the discovery of the structure of benzene, which is a closed carbon ring. A dream had presented a realization that served to revolutionize modern chemistry. Later, reporting his discovery to his colleagues at a scientific convention in 1890, he remarked, “Let us learn to dream, gentlemen, and then we may perhaps find the truth.” Not the sort of comment one generally expects from a scientist!

Here is the story of another scientist. Otto Loewi, who won the 1936 Nobel

Prize in Psychology and Medicine for his discovery of how the human nervous system works, credited this discovery to a dream. Prior to Loewi, scientists had assumed that the body’s nervous impulses were the result of electrical waves. However, in 1903 Loewi had the intuition that a chemical transmission was actually responsible. But he had no way to prove his theory, so he set the idea aside for many years. Then, in 1920, he had the following dream:

The night before Easter Sunday of that year I awoke, turned on the light, and jotted down a few notes on a tiny slip of thin paper. Then I fell asleep again. It occurred to me at six o’clock in the morning that during the night I had written down something most important, but I was unable to decipher the scrawl. The next night, at three o’clock, the idea returned. It was the design of an experiment to determine whether or not the hypothesis of chemical transmission that I had uttered seventeen years ago was correct. I got up immediately, went to the laboratory and performed a simple experiment on a frog’s heart according to the nocturnal design:
Its results became the foundation of the theory of chemical transmission of the nervous impulse.

Interestingly, Loewi had previously performed a similar experiment, which combined in his dreaming mind with the new idea, creating the successful result. This is an excellent example of the ability of dreams to combine with previous dreams, or with actual events, to produce fertile new ground.

These are some of the stories of famous people who have used dreams to solve problems, enhance creativity, and even make money and win important prizes. They are all evidence of the vast human ability to make use of dreams. As you draw upon your own dream life and develop skills in both dreaming and interpreting your dreams, you will become an advanced teen dreamer. Think of your dreams as a school where you are continually learning new skills and developing new aptitudes, reaching ever higher levels of achievement.

As you pay conscious attention to your dreams, and then use your dream symbols in your waking life, you will be integrating yourself, creating the greatest artwork of your life: your whole and unique Self.... Dreampedia

Read More...

Dreampedia

A SHORT HISTORY OF DREAMING

Dreams, it seems, have fascinated the entire human race from earliest times. And until quite recently, most cultures have set great store by dreams. For example, in ancient Egypt the high priests used dreams for prophecies. There still exists a papyrus book of dreams dating back approximately 3,500 years in which dream symbols are interpreted, proving that the Egyptians took their dreams seriously.

In ancient Greece, people believed that dreams were a direct contact with the gods. One of the principal uses of dreams was for healing. Sick people went to special temples that were dedicated to dreaming as a curative method. There, a physician would help to induce a dream, which the physician would then interpret as a guide to the treatment of the ailment, and its cause as well. In modern times, the father of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, drew upon the writings of Artemidorus, a Greek who lived in the second century B.C.E. whom Freud much admired. Artemidorus’s books have been preserved for over two thousand years and were in constant use as references before the scientific revolution put dreams into the category of “unimportant nonsense.”

At the time of the Italian Renaissance, when rational thinking was beginning to come to the fore, dreams began to be dismissed as trivial by-products of sleep. William Shakespeare denounced dreams as “the children of an idle brain.” (On the other hand, he wrote eloquently on the nature of dreams in his play Hamlet!) John Dryden, an English philosopher, dismissed dreams as the result of indigestion or infection. The bias against dreams continued through the nineteenth century, when most people thought that dreams were caused by some external stimulus—such as a knock on the door making a person dream the house was being burglarized. Aside from such shallow interpretation, most ordinary people, doctors and philosophers, church fathers and professors, believed that dreams had no meaning and saw no need to heed them.

In his autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Dr. Jung tells of a dream in which he was a guest at a garden party. Another guest was a woman from the town of Basel, a good friend of both Jung and his sister. In the dream, Jung says, he instinctively knew the woman from Basel would die. However, when he woke up he had no idea who the woman was in real life, though the dream was exceptionally vivid. He writes, “A few weeks later, I received news that a friend of mine had a fatal accident. I knew at once that she was the person I had seen in the dream but had been unable to identify.”

It took the work of Sigmund Freud to open people’s eyes once more to the possibility of dreams being important and useful. Though Freud was obsessed with sexual meanings in dreams to the exclusion of all else, he performed a useful service with the publication of his book on dream interpretation. However, his narrow view held that dreams were mere “wish fulfillment” and a substitute for sexual satisfaction. Fortunately, one of his student colleagues, Carl Gustav Jung of Switzerland, disagreed with Freud and formulated a more comprehensive theory of dream analysis.

Jung researched the previously unstudied territory of the unconscious and came up with the idea of a collective unconscious, through which all people were connected by a common store of knowledge and experience that often revealed itself in dreams.... Dreampedia

Read More...

Dreampedia

Dream Close
Dream Bottom Image