description

The meaning of Description in dream | Dream interpretation


Because descriptions are often figurative, they need to be researched for clarity

Dream Dictionary Unlimited | Margaret Hamilton


Description | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Description


MURAL

As “the writing on the wall”, a symbolic message of self-description; research symbols... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

APRICOT

Sexually attracted by the behind of someone (description of a woman having a behind like a “perfect apricot”—portnoy’s complaint). ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

ALLAH

God Almighty, Lord, Creator and Cherisher of the universes. There is nothing like unto Him and He is the All-Hearing, the Al-Seeing Lord. Seeing Him in a dream can be interpreted according to one’s state of being.

If one sees Him in His glory and majesty, without descriptive designation, without ascription of human characteristics to Him and without depiction or portrayal in the dream, it is an indication of glad tidings for both this world and the hereafter. These blessings also may continue to affect the lives of one’s progeny. Ifone sees Him otherwise in a dream, it means confusion, and particularly if the Almighty Lord does not address him.

If an ailing person sees Him in a dream, it means that he will soon die and come to meet Him. Ifa straying soul sees God Almighty in a dream, it will find guidance. Ifan oppressed person sees Him, it means that justice will prevail and he will triumph over his oppressors. HearingGod’s words without designation represents the imagination of the person in the dream. Perhaps hearing His words in a dream appeases one’s heart and increases the person’s drive for success. Hearing God’s words without seeing Him represents the rising of one’s station.

If one receives revelations from behind a veil in a dream, it means mental confusion and innovation. This is most true if a messenger comes in one’s dream and describes the one who spoke as God. In this case, the dream is a nightmare, because God Almighty cannot be depicted according to human descriptions.

If one sees a picture of God in his dream, it means that he is a liar who ascribes images to God Almighty that do not befit His Majesty and Glory.

If one hears God Almighty talking to him directly and if he can focus at Him in the dream, it means that he will be encompassed with God’s mercy and blessings. Ifone sees God Almighty in a dream, it means that he will look at His Divine countenance in the hereafter. Seeing God Almighty seated on the Divine Throne in a dream means elevation of one’s rank, knowledge and increase in his wealth.

If one sees himself running away to hide from God Almighty in a dream, it means that he will change the course of his devotion into heedlessness. Seeing a veil separating between the servant and his Lord in a dream means that one will commit major sins and abominable actions.

If one sees his Lord frowning at him, whereby he could not bear the effulgence of God’s light, or ifhe is seized by a shock and immediately commences to repent and pray for forgiveness in the dream, it means that such a person is indulging in abominable actions, and that he is a despicable sinner who follows his own mind and desires, and that he is an innovator of religious thoughts who misleads the people.

If one hears God Almighty talking to him in a dream, it represents an admonition and a warning to abstain from sin.

If one hears God Almighty talking to him in a dream, it also means that one is more assiduous in his recital of the Qur’iin. Ifone hears God Almighty talking to him with words he cannot understand, then if He anoints him and blesses him in the dream, it means that God Almighty will bringhim nigh unto Himselfand exalt his station.

If one sees God Almighty in a form resembling one’s father, a brother or a relative and showing His kindness or blessing him in a dream, it means that he will be afflicted with a calamity and a major illness.

If a righteous person sees himself standing before God Almighty in reverence and filled with awe in a dream, it means that mercy will encompass him and help him to further his growth.

The same interpretation applies if one sees himself prostrating before Him.

If God Almighty speaks to someone from behind a veil in a dream, it can also represent a good worshipper, but if the Divine address takes place without a veil in the dream, it means falling into sin.

If God Almighty names someone in his dream with his birth name, then adds another title to it, it means rising in station and rank.

If one sees God Almighty angry with him in a dream; it means that his parents are displeased with him. This description includes seeing oneself falling from the skies or from the top of a mountain.

If a devoted servant sees God Almighty kissing him in a dream, it applies to his growing devotion and reward. Fearing God Almighty in a dream reflects eminence, peacefulness, quiescence, wealth of being and disregard for material needs.

(Also see Carriers of the Divine Throne; Divine Throne; Educator; God’s will; King)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

PORCUPINE

Old dream interpretation books say the porcupine in your dreams is a omen of good news and bad news. Good things may happen to you, but they will carry difficulties with them. From a more pragmatic point of view, porcupines are cute but untouchable animals. As a dream symbol it may represent a situation or a person in your life that fits that description.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

WITCH

The witch in your dream could represent evil and ugliness or something more desirable such as enchantment.

The word witch is usually used to describe a mean and heartless person, and in your dream you may be making associations in regard to yourself or someone else that fits that description.

A witch could also represent power, magic, and goodness. “White magic” is as popular and culturally significant as darker witchcraft. However, whether good or evil, the witch always tries to defy natural law and uses a short cut to accomplish a task. Ask yourself questions about the general message in the dream; is it about revealing negative characteristics or about solving your problems and getting what you want out of life by using shortcuts? The most positive connotation of this dream could be that it encourages you to solve difficulties by using creativity and intuition and brings you closer to finding powerful and magical parts of yourself.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

PLANETS

A dream denoting joyful tidings (Gypsy). Probably derived from the Biblical description of the birth of Christ.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

CATEGORIES OF DREAMS

Gnffith, Miyago and Tago give 34 types of dream themes, from falling to being hung by the neck.

For the lay dreamer it is more useful to put dreams into much broader categories such as psychological. ESP, body, sexual, spiritual and problem solving. In researching the data for this book, some special cluster of dream themes were no­ticed.

For instance a cluster was noted in women past middle age, they dreamt of walking in a town and losing their hus­band. Description of these clusters can be seen in son and husband under family; losing teeth under body; flying; secret room under house; dead people; individuation. See also dream as meeting place; dream as spiritual guide; dream as therapist and healer; sex in dreams; ESP in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DEJA

vu Many dreamers say they find a connection between a place they dream of—especially a house—and a place they later see while awake. Most of these descriptions appear to be attempts to find connections obvious to no one but the dreamer.

A strong desire to have the inner world connect with the real world seems to be the motivation. This may be through a need for human life to have meaning and connec­tion with a wider, invisible, life.

The evidence of thousands of dreams suggests that searching for meaning in this direction is misplaced. Meaning arises from a love or acceptance of the many aspects of oneself, and thus the expansion of awareness into what was unconscious. While there may be valid cases of dcjd vu, they are rare. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DREAM ANALYSIS

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream.

It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult.

It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible.

It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward.

It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents.

It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DREAMER

Our current ‘self image’ is displayed by what we do in our dreams.

If we are the active and central character in our dreams, then we have a positive, confident image of our­self.

The role we place ourself in is also the one we feel at home with, or one which is habitual to us.

If we are con­stantly a victim in our dreams, we need to consider whether we are living such a role in everyday life. Dreams may help us look at our self image from a more detached viewpoint. We can look back on what we do in a dream more easily than we can on our everyday waking behaviour. This helps us under­stand our attitudes or stance, a very growth-promoting experi­ence.

It is important to understand the viewpoint of the other dream characters also; although they depict secondary views, they enlarge us through acquaintance. See identity and dreams.

What we ourself are doing in our dreams is an expression of how we see ourselves at the time of the dream, our stance or attitude to life, or what could be generalised as our self image. It typifies what aspects of our nature we identify with most strongly.

Example: My husband and I are at some sort of social club.

The people there are ex-workmates of mine and I am having a wonderful time and am very popular. My husband is enjoying my enjoyment’ (quoted from article by the author in She magazine).

The dreamer describes herself as ‘a mature 41- year old’.

The dream, and her description of it, sum up her image of herself in just a few words. She sees herself as attrac­tive, sociable, liked, happily married. She is probably good looking and healthy. But the dream carries on. She and her husband ‘are travelling down a country lane in an open horse drawn carriage.

It is very dark and is in the areas we used to live. We come to a hump-backed bridge, and as we amve at the brow of the bridge a voice says, “Fair lady, come to me.” My body is suddenly lying flat and starts to rise. I float and everything is black, warm and peaceful. Then great fear comes over me and I cry out my husband’s name over and over. I get colder and slip in and out of the blackness. I wake. Even with the light on I feel the presence of great evil. From a very positive sense of self, she has moved to a feeling which horri­fies her. How can such a confident, socially capable woman, one who has succeeded professionally as well as in her mar­riage, have such feelings? The answer probably lies in the statement of her age. At 41 she is facing the menopause and great physical change.

The image of herself she has lived with depended, or developed out of, having a firm sexually attrac­tive body, and being capable of having children. Losing what­ever it is that makes one sexually desirable must change the image others have of one, and that one has of oneself.

The hump of the bridge represents this peak of her life, from whence she will start to go downhill towards death, certainly towards retirement. So she is facing midlife crisis in which a new image of herself will need to be forged.

To define what self image is portrayed in your dreams, consider just what situation you have created for yourself in the dream, and what environment and people you are with. Example: I am a shy 16 year old and am worried about my dream. In it I am walking along the school’s main corridor. I try to cover myself with my hands as a few pei pie go by, not noticing me. Then a group of boys pass, pointing and laugh­ing at me—one boy I used to fancy.

A teacher then gives me clothes. They are too big but I wear them because I have nothing else’ (HM). Adolescence is a time of great change anyway, when a lot is developing as far as self image is con­cerned. Her nakedness shows how vulnerable she feels, and how she has a fear that other people must be able to see her developing sexuality and womanhood.

It is new to her and still embarrassing, particularly with boys she feels something for. She tries to cover up her feelings, and uses attitudes she has learnt from parents and teachers, but these are not suit­able. So we might summarise by saying that the situation she places herself in within the dream shows her present uncer­tainty and sense of needing clothes—attitudes or confidence —of her own. See identity in dreams; individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

POSTURES, MOVEMENT, BODY LANGUAGE

Even in everyday life, the way we hold and position our body, the inclination of chest and head, the movement of hands, are a means of com­munication.

The apparently intuitive information in some dreams, when investigated, can be traced to an unconscious insight into the language of the living body. We all have this ability to understand body language, but it seems to be some­thing which is inherited from past times before verbal lan­guage. It therefore remains a largely unconscious ability. In our dreams, however, it is a major factor in how the dream is structured.

If you cannot find a satisfying description below, imagine yourself making the movement or posture in the dream to see if you can define what the feeling quality is, or what you are saying non-verbally. It can often be of value to make the movement or take up the posture physically instead of in the imagination. By comparing the movement/posture with an­other one, it can help to clarify its quality.

Example: Marilyn was expenencing emotional pain con­nected with her impending divorce. Marilyn had dreamt of seeing a dinosaur standing in her path, devounng all who approached it. We explored it by having Marilyn find a body posture and movements which for her expressed the feeling of the dinosaur. In doing so Marilyn did not sense anger or aggression, but she did feel like a predator which always had to take to gain her own needs. This feeling immediately re­minded her of her family life as a child. She remembered when she was sent shopping as a very young child of three or four; as well as buying what she had been asked, she pur­chased some sweets for herself. When she arrived home she was treated as if she had done a terrible thing, and that was where she began to feel like a predator. It seemed to her as if her own needs were always gained at the expense of someone else.

‘With this awareness, she could now see that the dinosaur standing iti her path clearly related to her present situation. Bargaining to gain a realistic share of the house and property jointly owned by her husband and herself, felt to her as if she were gaining her needs at his expense, like a predator. That made her feel so awful, she was almost ready to allow her husband to take all, leaving her without house or money to start again. Her awareness of where the feelings arose from, and the unrealistic pan they played in her life, allowed her to relate to the situation with less pain and more wisdom’ (from Mind and Movement, Tony Crisp). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

SKY

The mind; our potential. Dream scenes such as the sky opening and people or objects appearing, or threatening things falling from the sky, are graphic descriptions of how suddenly a new thought or viewpoint or event appears from nowhere; or for no apparent reason anxious or depressing thoughts occur ‘out of the blue’. Floating, flying in sky: avoid­ing anxiety; escape into daydreaming or the mind; having a wider awareness of a situation; exploring potential. Colour, mood of sky: our view of life at the moment. Idioms: sky’s the limit; sky high, pie in the sky; out of the blue. See flying; space. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

TRANSFORMATION

Any dream in which an obvious change occurs in one of the dream figures shows transformation. Each of us go through major transformations during growth— not just physically, as when we change from a toothless baby to a walking, toothy child, but also psychologically.

Example: ‘On a hot summer day I was walking with a beautiful black woman through countryside. She stopped and told me she had a problem.

To show me she pulled down the strap of her dress. On her shoulder the black skin was peeling to reveal golden white skin underneath. She said that if she kept seeing me she would become completely white. She was going to ask advice from her mother about what to do. As we walked on two black men fought with me. They wanted to take her back to the village. I woke feeling I was winning’ (paraphrased from The Way of The Dream, Fraser Boa). Here the dreamer is relating well to his own feelings of sexuality and sensuality. However, he is beginning to see a female part­ner as a real person, not just as his sexuality paints her. Also, the reference to seeking advice from the mother suggests his ability to love is still not freed from emotional and erotic connections with his mother, and needs transforming. One often hears people, even in their 40s, saying It is difficult (developing a relationship) with that person because my mother doesn’t like them.’ The dreamer ‘fights’ the opposing drives, which want to take the man’s love back to the village, his childhood level of love—thus he moves towards becoming independent in love and life.

The transformation is towards mature love and relatedness.

For a further description of the major areas and themes of transformation, see individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

UFO

Example: ‘A flying saucer dropped a man on our lawn. He was 7 feet tall and stood in a ring of light.

The sky was vivid pink and a peculiar aeroplane flew over. It was the shape of a cross’ (Mrs A).

The circle, the light, the shape of the cross and the big man, are all symbols of the Self. Our mind has the ability to view our experience as a whole, rather than in pans. What we sense unconsciously in this way is presented to the conscious mind as images such as UFOs or circles of light.

The ball of light or fire, this is a common waking experi­ence as well as a dream image, which occurs when the person touches their sense of wholeness as described above. We see this mentioned in the description of Pentecost—the flame on top of the head—and may account for cases of people seeing flying saucers. See hallucinations, hallucinogens; satellite; dream as spiritual guide; unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

WALL

Codes of behaviour, belief systems, attitudes—often un­conscious—you live within, or are protected by; the bound­aries of behaviour or thought you keep within, are fearful of extending beyond, or are trapped by, thereby what one feels to be barriers or restrictions, one’s feelings of confidence which protect against anxiety or social knocks’; the feelings or attitudes you keep people away with—the walls we put up between us to maintain privacy, stop being hun, or to main­tain a role or status. Also a special feeling which you have created, such as developing a sense of one’s own value.

Example: I realised T had been in Bill’s room and not respected his need for privacy, so Bill had tom down the wall as a protest and made the room, which now appeared about four times its usual size, into a public sitting room’ (Cyril A). Sometimes what the wall depicts is obvious, as in the exam­ple, where it is shown as the way Cyril maintains his separa­tion from others and thus is a private individual.

The fall of the wall shows how exposed’ one might be.

The description of private areas of our life in a newspaper might be an exam­ple of just such a wall coming down. Idioms: drive up the wall; go to the wall; writing on the wall; back to the wall; knock one’s head against a wall. See wall, fence. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

ELECTRICITY

(see Circuit Breaker, Light, Lightning) Shocking changes.

A sudden increase in personal energy. Look to see what the source of power is for further insight.

The driving force within the dreamer. Where the electricity originates should shed more light on the meanings here.

Being a “live wire” or knowing someone who fits this description.

The counsel here is to maintain a good sense of grounding so that the energy doesn’t go to waste or become harmful.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

CROCKERY

To dream of owning much crockery prophesies gradually increasing financial stability. In whatever form, unless it is broken, and of whatever description, crockery is a fortunate thing to dream about.... The Complete Dream Book

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The Complete Dream Book

EXCHANGING

To dream of exchanging articles of any description is significant to those engaged in business. It foretells profitable deals.... The Complete Dream Book

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The Complete Dream Book

NAPKINS

Of whatever description, napkins foretell surprising but pleasant news.... The Complete Dream Book

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The Complete Dream Book

RUBBER

A dream of stretching rubber of any description foretells that you are in danger of doing a grave injustice to someone.

A woman who dreams of putting on rubber garments or elastic garters should be warned against listening to the gossip of her neighbors.... The Complete Dream Book

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The Complete Dream Book

SAUSAGE

If you dream of eating sausage of any description, you will be mystified by an occurrence that wiU eventually work out to your advantage.... The Complete Dream Book

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The Complete Dream Book

CONNECTION

Vision: Forming an intimate relationship: meeting a new friend.

A wrong phone connection: you are being played for a fool, or the person you tried to call wants nothing to do with you. See Telephone.

Depth Psychology: The motto: *two heads are better than one” is an apt description here. But the dream means to reconcile and correct your different character traits. Sometimes the dream might be a warning against false friends—if the connection was ubad.w... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

GOAT

Symbol: The goat stands for being alert and listening attentively. Vision: Watching goats at play: try not to be too boisterous or foolish. Watching goats being milked: modesty will serve you well in a coming situation. Listening to goats: it does not matter how hard you try—someone will always find something to complain about.

Depth Psychology: The female goat is a symbol of patience, modesty, amiability, and the ability to resolve challenging situations without difficulty.

The goat—as the sacrificial lamb—is also a sign of the sacrifices you have made in your life. Which description—modesty or martyrdom—fits your present situation?

See Billy Goat. ... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

BOW

a vision of a bow is interpreted upon 7 sides: travel, child, brother & woman, good descriptions / depictions, strength, difficult men, according to the bow’s rigidity / fastening.... Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

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Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

PARENTS

To see your parents in your dream, symbolizes power, shelter and love. You may be expressing your concerns and worries about your own parents. As a rule, fathers represent authority and mothers symbolize love, and you will have to figure out the full meaning of your dream by thinking about what your parents did or said in your dream, and how that could be related to situations or issues in your waking life.

If you dream that your parents are getting divorced, you may be expressing your real life concerns and worries about your folks.

For more detailed descriptions, also see “Mother” and “Father”.... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

PERFUME

General Meaning: Perfume, oil, myrrh and incense often share the same interpretations.

• Some common interpretations for perfume are: Our praise to the Lord, being beautified, being prepared, being honored and being cleansed.

• Perfume changes your emotions and causes you to be drawn to it. It can be a pleasant experience, or it can speak of being caught in a trap.

• Referring to how perfume lifts the emotions: • Proverbs 27:9 Ointment and perfume rejoice the heart: so [does] the sweetness of a man’s friend by hearty counsel.

• Dreams • Positive: A bride was prepared with oils and perfume to prepare her for her wedding night. Esther is a good example of this.

• This speaks of the Bride of Christ being prepared and made ready for her Groom. It speaks of her falling in love with her Groom - which is Jesus Christ.

• The Scriptures also speak of our praise being as incense before the Lord; that it is a pleasing smell before Him.

• Incense was offered before the Lord twenty-four hours a day under the Old Covenant. Our incense is our praise and worship.

• Speaking of the Love of Bride and Groom • Song of Solomon 4:10 How beautiful is your love, my beloved, [my] bride! how much better is your love than wine! and the fragrance of your perfume than all spices! • As believers we also diffuse the perfume of Christ everywhere we go - or we should anyway! • Because of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, as we go through this world, we carry that treasure inside of us.

• It is just like wearing perfume. Everyone that passes you should be effected by it. I give a good description of this in the Practical Prophetic Ministry book when teaching on the ministry of the prophet.

• 2 Corinthians 2:14 Now thanks [be] to God, which always causes us to triumph in Christ, and makes manifest the savor of his knowledge by us in every place.

Negative: The Scripture also speaks of the perfume of the harlot and adulteress.

• It speaks of being captured and seduced into the things of the world; of being deceived into thinking that you are being offered something good, when in fact it is false and full of sin.

• Speaking of the harlot (world) that seduces; a love that is false and empty: • Proverbs 7:171 have perfumed my bed with myrrh, aloes, and cinnamon.

• 18 Come, let us take our fill of love until the morning: let us solace ourselves with loves.

• 22 He goes after her immediately as an ox goes to the slaughter, or as a fool to the correction of the stocks

See also:

Aloes, Honey, Oil.... The Way of Dreams and Visions

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The Way of Dreams and Visions

BREAK

Be prepared for a period of unrewarding struggle if your dream featured breaking, broken, or damaged articles of any description.

The more valuable or important the broken item, the longer will be the trying period.

There are two exceptions to this rule: broken eyeglasses signify success where you expected failure, and breaking (or broken) bones (human) forecast an unexpected legacy.

See also under Glass, Furniture, etc.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

CROSS

Joy and triumph, but only after a hard struggle and some grief, is predicted in a dream featuring a cross of any description.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

ARTIST

Everyone, without exception, needs to be loved and recognized by others. This dream can represent your most creative and intuitive side. Maybe you need to express yourself from a creative perspective. For those who dream of being artists, this ambition is even more apparent. It may also tell you how to sublimate passions that you are not able to manifest.

If you are painting a picture, it may represent the description of your own situation at the time. So, soon you will see things more clearly.

Probably, you need to brush up your plans in order to gain recognition.

If in the dream you talk about art, you might be promoted at work.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

MAP

A map is a detailed description of an area so that navigation of that area is possible. As a symbol, a map represents the guidance you need to go where you desire. Since most maps deal with land, the focus here is on traversing areas of your conscious mind. There is an implication, however, that you may be going to places as yet unexplored.

The map shows up in your dreams when you are about to go on a trek of self-investigation and is an indication that you are being guided by forces beyond your comprehension to help you do so.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

THROAT

The throat is the seat of all communication, and anything that occurs in this area of the body in a dream relates to issues you are having around your voice, such as owning it and communicating from an authentic and strong perspective. Many dreams that involve the throat include challenges and compromise, from violent attacks to permutations of the body. Whatever is happening in the dream with your throat, consider it a description of how you are using your voice in your current life circumstances and relationships.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

CHIMNEY

Chimneys are often associated with cultural implications of Santa Claus arriving to reward those who have been good with gifts. They also symbolize the warmth and cheer of family as in the traditional “home-sweet-home” scene on the front of greeting cards, gifts of candies, and food and homemade items of every description featuring the smoking brick chimney.... Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

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Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

ZOO

“This place is a zoo!” is a common description of chaos and confusion.

Dreaming of a zoo may indicate that the dreamer needs to tidy up some situation.... Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

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Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

JOURNEYS OUT OF THE BODY

Some of the earliest research into OBEs was conducted by Frenchman Yarm Louis Forham (1884-1917), who believed that everyone was capable of astral travel in a variety of guises, recording his observations in Practical Astral Travel. Forham claimed to have made astral visits to a woman he later married and to have experienced astral sex. Between 1902 and 1938, Englishman Oliver Fox took research into OBEs one step further when he claimed to have succeeded in inducing OBEs with lucid dreaming (see INTRODUCTION). He published his discoveries in 1920 in the journal English Occult Review and later in a book, Astral Projection. A fellow Englishman and OBE investigator, J. H. M. Whiteman claimed to have had thousands of OBEs, sometimes in the form of a woman or a child, between 1931 and 1953, which he described in The Mystical Life.

Robert A. Monroe (1915-1995), former television executive of Westchester County, New York, attracted widespread interest in OBEs from both the public and the scientific community when he published his account of OBEs in Journeys out of the Body (1971). His interest in OBEs had been triggered in 1958 when he began having spontaneous OBEs in his sleep. In his book, he described the experience as follows: "In 1958, without any apparent cause, I began to float out of my physical body.

It was not voluntary; I was not attempting any mental feats. It was not during sleep, so I couldn’t dismiss it as simply a dream. I had full, conscious awareness of what was happening, which of course only made it worse. I assumed it was some sort of hallucination caused by something dangerous—a brain tumor, or impending mental illness. Or imminent death. It occurred usually when I would lie down or relax for rest or preparatory to sleep—not every time but several times weekly. I would float up a few feet above my body before I became aware of what was happening. Terrified, I would struggle through the air and back into my physical body. Try as I might, I could not prevent it from recurring."

In his books, Monroe sets out an astonishing range of experience, some of which was unpleasant and involved meeting entities or thought forms that attacked him. He also described an overwhelmingly powerful energy: meeting the astral forms of other humans and sexual experiences on the astral level. He outlines his belief that there were various levels of existence in the OBE state. Locale I is earth, the here and now. Locale II is the infinite astral plane where everyone goes to sleep and dreams, and where countless entities exist. <p>Locale III transcends space and time and is a parallel universe. In his writings, Monroe described a technique for triggering out-of-body states and here is a brief description of it:

  • First lie down in a darkened room in a relaxing position.
  • Loosen your clothing and remove all jewelry.
  • Enter a very relaxed state and consciously tell yourself that you will remember everything that happens to you.
  • Begin breathing through your half open mouth.
  • Concentrate on an object.
  • When other images start to enter your mind, just passively watch them.
  • Try to clear your mind and observe your field of vision through your closed eyes.
  • Do nothing more for a while.
  • Simply look through your closed eyelids at the blackness in front of you.
  • After a while, you may notice light patterns.
  • When these cease, you will enter a state of such relaxation that you lose all awareness of the body.
  • You are almost in the state where your only source of stimulation will be your own thoughts.
  • It is in this relaxed and refreshed condition that out-of-body journeys are triggered.
  • To leave your body, think of yourself getting lighter and of how nice it would be to float upwards.
  • With sufficient practice, Monroe claims that a wide variety of experiences can occur.

If Monroe’s theories are correct, the implications for dream interpretation would be enormous. Even though surveys suggest that one quarter of the population believes they have had an OBE, recent research on OBEs has been inconclusive. This may be because OBEs vary from individual to individual. Laboratory tests have been equally inconclusive, even with individuals who claim to be able to project out of body at will. Tests with animals have been a little more promising, with kittens showing a change in behavior during out-of-body efforts to comfort them; skeptics, however, argue that this was achieved through telepathy or clairvoyance. Although OBE’s cannot be disproved, to date there has been no solid evidence that anyone has actually left their body during sleep or while dreaming.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

MONSTER

If you dream of being hunted by a savage and terrible monster of any kind, you might want to try and face it if the dream recurs. Mystery is not so terrifying once it is identified and understood, since it becomes something you can recognize and therefore deal with.

If you do recognize your personal monster, you might also want to try and engage it in a dialogue. A classic way to interpret a difficult dream such as this was devised by Dr Frederick Perls, the distinguished Gestalt therapist. Take two chairs and place them opposite each other. You sit in one and imagine your dream monster or enemy in the other chair. Move between the chairs as you first ask and answer the questions. Try asking your dream monster what it wants, why it is in your dreams and why it is chasing you. The process may take some time, but eventually you (as the dream) may deliver a message that speaks to you. When that happens, you may find it easier to face your fears and interpret your dream. By understanding nasty nightmare animals, as well as people, places or things, you may be able to harness their energy and take back into your self those parts of your personality you have been trying to disown.

Animals in dreams reflect the animal or instinctual part of your nature, so if the fierce animal terrorizing you in a dream is a tiger, lion or snake, consider what this animal represents to you and what it says about your psychological state. Are you confining, restricting or subduing an important part of yourself? If you begin to get answers to these questions, you may find that the animals in your dreams become less fierce and threatening. It might also help to draw or write a description of your animal. Of course, your personal associations to the specific animals is of great importance here.

If your shadow—the part of yourself that you keep hidden—appears in your dreams as a monster, fierce animal, murderer, vampire, werewolf, ghost or other sinister threatening being, this may be a positive thing; it is your dreaming mind’s way of reintroducing the parts of yourself you are repressing in an effort to make you whole. See also ANIMALS; SPIRITS AND GHOSTS; SURREALISM AND FANTASY.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

OUT-OF-BODY EXPERIENCE

When a person feels that they have stepped out of, or been separated from, their physical body and have the ability to travel to another location on earth or even to nonworldly realms, they are said to have had an out-of-body experience (OBE). An OBE can occur when a person is awake, or before, during and after sleep. It can also occur during times of stress, illness, trauma and fear, as well as being able to be induced by hypnosis and meditation. Also known as astral projection or travel, such experiences are believed to occur during sleep, as well as during times of great physical or emotional trauma. So if you had a dream in which you left your physical body, perhaps even watched your body for a while as you floated on the ceiling, and then flew up the stars and the moon or to a location miles away, you may not have been dreaming; you may have been traveling out of your body.

This isn’t as crazy as it sounds. Descriptions of OBEs, or of the separation of the consciousness from the body, have been recorded since ancient times. The ancient Egyptians believed in a life force, called ’ka’, which was independent of the body. Plato believed the soul could leave the body and travel, whilst both Socrates and Pliny gave many descriptions of experiences that closely resemble OBEs. The ancient Chinese thought that an OBE could be achieved through meditation, whilst tribal shamans, firm believers in body doubles, claim to be able to project themselves out of their bodies.

Common to most OBE experiences is the existence of a second body, described as a ghostly double of the physical body. It is usually invisible to the eyes of others, although it may be sensed or witnessed as an apparition. In some cases, a silvery cord connecting the astral to the physical body is reported and it is said that if this cord is severed from the body, death will occur. In this astral form, OBE travellers report floating around the earth or to an astral plane, claiming that they travel as fast as the speed of thought, feeling neither pain nor anxiety. Individuals claim that they leave their body through their head or simply rise up and float away. Re-entry occurs by simply re-entering the head or melting into the body. It is worth pointing out that even those who describe the experience as something fantastic that occurs during sleep are very specific in describing the experience as one which was clearly not a dream; and many stress a sense of feeling more awake than they felt when they were normally awake.

Despite the documented records of those who claim to have had an OBE, scientific evidence for the phenomenon remains inconclusive, prompting skeptics to argue that OBEs are nothing more than vividly fantastic dreams or altered states of consciousness.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

LEARN DREAM SYMBOL LANGUAGE

Your dream and its symbols speak through the language of dream symbolism. Although that language shares similarities across dreamers, each dreamer’s subconscious mind speaks in its own personal “dialect” of dream symbolism. So in this book you’ll learn about the “standard” language of dream symbols (to the extent that there is a standard one), plus you’ll learn how to decipher your own subconscious mind’s personal symbol meanings (your personal “dialect”). The following three sections introduce the primary considerations about personal dream symbol translation to keep in mind as you explore the symbol descriptions in this book.

Personal Meaning
Because dream symbol meaning is subjective and personal to the dreamer, consider what the symbol means to you personally. To help yourself better understand its personal meaning, you could ask yourself:

  • What thoughts and feelings come up when I think of this thing?
  • How would I describe this thing to someone who has never seen it before? (See also TOOL: Caveman Explanation.)
  • How would I feel about this thing if I actually saw it in real life?
  • What would I say if someone asked for my impression of this thing?

Context
A dream symbol’s meaning can be very specific to its context in the dream. So, think about how the symbol appeared in the dream and what that may convey about its meaning. For example, pay attention to:

  • Where was the object?
  • Was there anything unusual about its location or position?
  • What was it near or surrounded by (objects, people, etc.)?
  • What was its environment (indoor or outdoor, lighting, mood, weather, etc.)?
  • (If an inanimate object) What was happening to it?
  • (If a living being) What was it doing, how, where, and with whom?
  • How were the characters (including you) viewing or relating to it?
  • How did you feel about all of the above?
  • Look Beyond the Obvious

A dream symbol often represents something beyond its obvious meaning. A rose could represent a real-life rose, but it’s much more likely to represent something else more symbolic (such as a feeling, characteristic, or event). So look beyond your symbol’s literal meaning by asking yourself, “What else could this symbol mean?”

Let Intuition Be Your Guide

  • As you work toward understanding a dream symbol, the goal is for your intuition to recognize the symbol’s true meaning. The process of reaching that your subconscious mind to reveal the symbol’s meaning, and to give your intuition a chance to recognize the meaning when you see it.
  • Whether a particular meaning from this book or elsewhere in your mind is the true meaning of your dream symbol.

(For more on intuition as a dream interpretation tool, see Recognizing Dream Symbol Meaning.)

Take the Winding Path
“When you start down the path of exploring a particular dream symbol, be willing to persevere even if the path is a winding one. You may not always know which way to go, but your intuition will guide you if you pay attention to it.

Since your goal in symbol exploration is to intuitively recognize the symbol’s true meaning, it’s a good idea to give your mind a chance to encounter that meaning so your intuition can recognize it. Sometimes the true meaning simply comes forward within your consciousness and then your intuition confirms it. However, more often you’ll need to put in a little more effort to discover it. If the true meaning isn’t evident, you can use a technique that parades various possible meanings past your “inner intuitive eye,” giving it a chance to confirm the true one. The technique can be as simple as mentally listing the meanings you associate with the symbol or reading the symbol’s description in this book. You could also use a dream analysis tool that prompts your subconscious mind to reveal the meanings it associates with the symbol, such as TOOL: Caveman Explanation, or many others in the Dream Analysis Toolkit in the first book of this series, The Curious Dreamer’s Practical Guide to Dream Interpretation.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

WORKING WITH DREAM IMAGES

All dream images have a symbolic message. The ones that are the most startling are the fear images. We have many fears we have suppressed from childhood on, and these are free to surface in both dream and meditative states. It is important to remember that you are not your fears. Fears are simply negative thought forms which have no reality on their own. When we take away their power, they no longer have any influence over our lives. Although our purpose in life is to meet the self, we spend a lot of time running away. We are afraid of many things, especially those which are unknown to us. We fear that which we do not understand. Each fear represents a block to our true beauty, the inner spiritual being. We should welcome all these frightening images, as they will reveal to us limited thinking and beliefs that thwart our development. Any images that you identify but do not understand can be met and worked with in a "do it yourself" guided imagery or through meditation. This technique is particularly helpful when working with frightening images. If you have a frightening monster creature, or a frightening person, it is a fear blown out of proportion. Upon awakening bring the image back to mind. Imagine this "being" unzipping its monster costume, letting the fearful outer garb fall to the floor. Instead a little part of the self walks out, maybe a tiny little person, who offers you a present. You ask the little being what it has to teach you and imagine it lovingly giving you its message. You can establish a dialogue with any dream image and let it talk back to you. Just do a Disneyland number with it. If it is a tree, imagine it with a face, arms and legs, and ask it questions. If it is a big fence or wall, again, give it a face and let it talk to you. Imagine what it would say. To use this technique effectively, try the following steps:
  1. Write down a description of the dream image you do not understand.
  2. Relax, enter a meditative state, then picture the image in your mind. If it is inanimate, give it a face and let it talk to you. If it is big and fearful, imagine it unzipping its scary Halloween suit and stepping out as something quite harmless and ordinary. Then strike up a conversation. Remember, the scare tactics are just to get your attention.
  3. Now ask: What insight have you brought me? Or, What part of myself do you represent? Allow the image to speak to you; make up what you think it will say if words do not come readily. You may actually hear words or just get a strong sense of what this form really represents.
  4. After the conversation, thank the image for appearing to you. If you still feel unclear, ask it to present itself in a different form in your next dream so that you will understand.
When you begin to gain control of the dream state, that is, when you know you are dreaming, then you can stop and meet images while still in the dream. If something is chasing you, you can turn around and say, ''Hey, wait a minute. Let's get this thing settled. Why am I allowing you to chase me, and what part of me do you represent?" When you can confront an image in the dream, you get immediate insight on what it is. And as soon as you face a fear, you have conquered it. Keep a sense of humor and you immediately restore perspective. Also, when you become aware at any time you are dreaming, you can stop a dream and say, "All right, now I am ready to learn." You can ask any question and the answer will be given. This is what we are working to do: to gain complete control of the dream state so that it becomes a vehicle for higher learning and integration of self.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS

“All dreams are given for the benefit of the individual, would he but interpret them correctly.”
EDGAR CAYCE

Most dreams are full of images: of people dead and alive, known and unknown, animals both domestic and wild, landscapes and buildings familiar and strange, or any number of other symbolic images such as jewelry, household things, clothing, and so on. A dream usually has some kind of a story line. You may find yourself on an adventure of some kind. You may dream of celebrities or other famous people either from the present or the past.

I once had a fascinating dream of visiting the president Woodrow Wilson, who had been in office during the time of World War I, long before I was even born. During my dream visit to the president, we talked of many things of a psychic and occult nature. I wondered what it meant. When I discussed this dream with my dreamwork partner, who was a good bit older than I and very knowledgeable about matters concerning the occult, he told me that Woodrow Wilson had held seances in the White House! At the time, I was just beginning my own studies of the occult and having psychic experiences on a regular basis.

Food is another symbol that often appears in dreams. The kind of food and how it is presented and eaten (if eating occurs) are matters for the dreamer to understand. Food dreams may relate to what you had for supper—or what you wanted to have and didn’t get. Or you may have food concerns, such as being on a diet to lose weight or trying to gain weight.

The number of symbols that the dream-mind can produce is practically endless, and most of these symbols are up for individual interpretation. Some, however, have universal meaning. We’ll discuss mostly the first kind in this chapter.

PERSONAL DREAM SYMBOLS

One of the best ways to get at the meaning of the symbols in your dreams is by free association. This is the method made popular by the psychologist Sigmund Freud. In this method, you simply go with the first thing that pops into your mind when the trigger word is given. Do the exercises presented on pages 48–50 in order to begin to get familiar with your own word associations.

AMPLIFICATION OF SYMBOLIC MEANINGS

Once you have identified a symbol in a dream, you can use the free association process to get at its meaning. If you don’t immediately get an associative thought about the dream symbol, work backward through your feelings and experiences with the symbol until you hit something that fits or makes sense. Suppose, for example, that you see a tiger in a dream. Do you like tigers or are they an object of fear? Maybe you saw a nature film recently about tigers and are concerned about their survival as a species. The important thing is to discover what a tiger means to you in the present, for the meanings of your symbols can change over time.

As you begin to work with your dreams on a regular basis and gain a high level of ability to recall your dreams (which we’ll discuss in chapter 5), you will become familiar with your own personal symbolic style. Most of us are influenced symbolically by the objects we are familiar with—such as religious symbols like crosses and pictures of saints or holy people—and also by our everyday life experiences. For example, if you have a pet of any kind, you are likely to dream about that animal. Of course, you may dream about animals even if you don’t keep a pet, and you may dream about wild animals. But if you dream of your own pet, it will have personal significance to you alone.

Sometimes you have a dream that seems to complete some unfinished business of the day—say you had a math problem you couldn’t solve and you dreamed yourself in a classroom with the solution written on the blackboard. Freud believed that dreams were “wish fulfillment” vehicles, and it is true that we can dream of things or experiences that we want (such as getting a date with a particular person) but dreams are much, much more than simple wish fulfillment. They are complex and multileveled, as you will realize by working steadily with your dreams.

“Then your I is no longer your mundane little self but the I of the Big Dreamer who is dreaming the whole universe.”
Fred A. Wolf, Physicist

Most dream symbols are not to be taken literally. You often need to do a bit of sleuthing to get at what the message of the dream symbol, or story, is for you. An example I read in one dream book was a dream of Bob Hope hopping on a pogo stick. At first, this seems nonsensical, but the dreamer was depressed and the dream was interpreted as “Hope springs eternal.” Here’s an example of a recent series of dreams of my own, concerning food.

  • I was preparing to go on an eating program that required the elimination of all sugar, and as soon as I had set a date to begin I started having dreams of all kinds of luscious desserts—beautifully iced and decorated cakes, pies piled high with whipped cream, the most enticing confections of chocolate from cakes to cookies and everything in between, pastries stuffed with sweet cheese and iced with thick sugar, fancy French fruit tarts of every description.
  • At first, I took this to be simple resistance of my unconscious to changing my eating habits, but I actually don’t eat a lot of sweets, and when I do have dessert I favor simple, homey things like custard, stewed fruit, or fruit cobbler. I’ve never had a taste for heavily iced cakes, plus I am one of the few people on the planet who doesn’t like chocolate! So why was I dreaming of all these fancy sweet foods that I wouldn’t even want to eat?
  • My first take on the dreams—of which there were several during a week or so—was that I was feeling deprived in advance and that my imagination was plying me with these luscious images of sweets to weaken my decision to eliminate sweets. But this didn’t make a lot of sense, as the fancy confections weren’t what I’d want to eat anyway. So I looked deeper.
  • What was food as a symbol to me, especially this kind of elaborately prepared party food? Well, party food means a party—or at least company for dinner. I’d been going through a period of relative isolation, partly because I was busy writing and partly because I hadn’t been feeling up to par. My social life had dropped to almost zero. The dreams were actually telling me that I was feeling deprived of—not the coming lack of sweets—but what special food, especially desserts, represents socially. Food of course represents nourishment; however, my dreams were not about nutrition! My first interpretation of deprivation was definitely a clue to the true meaning of the dreams. Yet they were a message that I needed, not sweets, but some sweet occasions and to take the time to be with people more. Can you think of a get-together that doesn’t involve food? Usually fancy food, and always, desserts.
  • Using this as an example, think of what dreams of fancy desserts might mean to you. And if you’ve ever dreamed of food, try to remember what kind of food and under what circumstances you dreamed of it. Then think of what those various foods might symbolize for you.

Here’s another example along the same lines, but with a different twist—that of a lemon peel!

  • A friend had been struggling with his weight, and he had decided to quit drinking his nightly martini in order to cut out some calories. He had decided to switch to a single glass of wine with dinner instead. He did this and found himself enjoying his new way of dining. But then he started having dreams about martinis. For about a week, he told me, he had nothing but dreams featuring martinis, with a twist of lemon peel. He had always put olives in his martinis, not lemon peel, so this puzzled him. When he told me about the dreams, I flashed on the standard language of a bartender, who when taking an order for a martini will say, “Do you want a twist?” After some discussion of what the word twist meant to him, he revealed that he had recently twisted his ankle and it had been quite painful, but he hadn’t bothered to see a doctor about the problem. His dream was showing him that a “twist” was in need of his attention. It didn’t relate to his martini drinking at all, except that this was a familiar picture and dreams always speak in our own language, even if they do twist it around a bit!

It is interesting to note that some types of dreams that we know to be quite common have never been reported from sleep labs (as least not as far as I have found in my research). One of these is the nightmare. It seems that people don’t want to tell their deepest fears to a sleep lab researcher. Another common type is the wet dream, so named for when a male ejaculates semen while dreaming (though females also have this type of sexual dream). It is interesting to note that most of the subjects in sleep labs are young male college students, whom one might presume to often have wet dreams. But these are, apparently, considered too private to dream when under observation.

Most dreams are not to be taken literally; just because you dream of someone dying does not mean the person will die. In fact, the literal interpretation of dreams can be dangerous and cause fear and anxiety. Also, dream books are not to be trusted. It’s worth repeating that you have your own set of inner symbolic meanings. What a cat means to me—an avid cat lover—and what a cat means to someone who hates or fears cats would be something quite different. Always remember that your inner symbol-producing mechanism is yours alone, unique. That being emphasized, there are a few symbols that can be considered universal, such as the ocean or water representing the unconscious processes.

The best way for you to learn to interpret your own personal symbol system is by continually paying attention to your dreams, writing them down, and doing your own interpretations. Dream interpretation is an art, not a science, and no scientific sleep lab can read the content or measure the meaning of dreams. Isis, the ancient Egyptian goddess queen, was believed to say “No mortal has lifted my veil,” and this can well apply to the scientific efforts to penetrate the mysteries of dream in sleep labs.

If you are just beginning to pay attention to your dreams, begin the process of interpretation by recording the symbols that appear most frequently. This applies especially to any recurring dreams or motifs you may experience. For example, I know that when my cat Fuzz (who’s dead now) appears in a dream, it means my heart center is the subject of the dream. Depending on the story line of the dream and what Fuzz is doing or how we are interacting, I can figure out what the dream message about my heart is.

“There are a lot of people on the planet right now who don’t think that dreams are important. Perhaps it is that attitude which contributes to the ill health of the planet as a whole. If so, it depends more and more on you, the Spiritual Warriors of your generation, to weave the dreams that can heal the planet.”

Dr. Laurel Ann Reinhardt, “Dream Weaving,” in The Thundering Years by Julie Johnson

  • Recently, I dreamed that Fuzz had been hit by a car, but I knew instinctively that he was still alive. My brother was waiting outside in a car and I asked him to take me to find Fuzz and get an emergency vet. He did and Fuzz was saved. The dream came on the heels of a severe disappointment (one might say I was heartbroken), but I was being told that everything would come out all right in the end, which it did.
  • What is interesting about this dream is that even though I did not see the cat get hit by the car, I knew he was still alive. This told me that although I had been hurt emotionally, I would get over it. It also showed me that help was at hand—my brother was waiting in the car, and a vet was readily available. I had friends I could turn to who would help me to heal from a hurtful experience. In this way, our dreams spill over into everyday life.
  • The world of dream and intuition is really not divorced from our everyday reality, not a thing apart. Most people today think their dreams have nothing to do with real life, but they are wrong. We are all multifaceted beings with complexities of which often we are hardly aware. Too many people operate solely on linear thinking (the standard modern-day mode that is taught to young people in schools) and aren’t aware that there are other ways to think and to obtain information. As Seth, the “spirit guide” that Jane Roberts “channeled” in a series of books “by” Seth, says, “You must change your ideas about dreaming, alter your concepts about it, before you can begin to explore it. Otherwise, your own waking prejudice will close the door.”

    All of the many facets of our personalities are operating all the time, even when we aren’t conscious of them, just like our body chemistry goes on about its business when we are totally unaware of its functioning. Dreams can speak to parts of ourselves that we are ignoring, but we can’t get the benefit from them unless we pay attention and approach their symbolic messages with an open mind and trusting heart.

    While the symbolism in dreams may require interpretation, when we have difficulty with it we must realize that its purpose isn’t to mystify us. As Dr. Jung says in his autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections:

    • I was never able to agree with Freud that the dream is a “façade” behind which its meaning lies hidden—a meaning already known but maliciously, so to speak, withheld from consciousness. To me dreams are a part of nature, which harbors no intentions to deceive but expresses something as best it can just as a plant grows or an animal seeks its food as best it can.

    In working with your own personal dream symbols and motifs to decipher the meaning of your dreams, you may need to come at them from all angles. The following mind-mapping technique is especially helpful for those who function better using pictures and images, colors and drawings, than using a strictly verbal or writing mode.

    As you practice interpreting your dreams and get more deeply into the process, it will become an enjoyable habit and you’ll soon feel like an old pro at the game. You will get better and better, and your confidence will start to soar. Even if you have only a scrap of a dream to go on, it can lead to fruitful ideas. Here’s an example from my personal files:

    • The Dream: A blond man speaks to me at a hotel of some sort. He breaks into French as his English fails him, and though I don’t know French well I understand what he is saying. He gives me a key, which looks like the key to the security lock on my front door in real life. I ask what it is for and he replies that I will find out. When I go back to my room at the hotel I find that the key fits into a TV set, tuning it to a higher octave or a channel, like UHF, but much higher than that. I watch something on this “TV” but don’t really understand it.
    • My interpretation of this brief fragment (for there was more I didn’t remember) is that I am being given the “key” to a higher channel of myself. I don’t yet know how to use this channel, and I can’t understand what is being shown on this new type of TV. In other words, I am receiving communications in a language I don’t fully understand. This dream had great meaning for me, as I was at that time in the process of becoming “psychic,” but didn’t really know what it meant or where it would lead. Later on, I experienced the “opening of the psychic door” on a trip to Germany, became a Tarot card reader, a professional astrologer, and a psychotherapist. This dream seemed to forecast these developments. That the man was blond suggests the Sun, or Higher Mind. His speaking in French might be a reference to my own French ancestors, all of whom spoke French as their native language, yet it was not taught to me so I grew up speaking English from day one. This hinted that I already “knew” the “foreign” language from hearing it spoken as a child.

    With a little skill, you’ll be able to start integrating your dreams into everyday life. We’ll get into this in the next chapter, where we discuss how you can use dreams for specific purposes. However, please approach the entire subject of your dreams, their interpretations, and how you can use them with an open mind and in a relaxed state. Getting tense over interpretation is counterproductive and will block your efforts to make connections.... Dreampedia

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