The meaning of Destroyed in dream | Dream interpretation


A warning

Dream Dictionary Unlimited | Margaret Hamilton


Destroyed | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Destroyed


LEDGER

To dream of keeping a ledger, you will have perplexities and disappointing conditions to combat.

To dream that you make wrong entries on your ledger, you will have small disputes and a slight loss will befall you.

To put a ledger into a safe, you will be able to protect your rights under adverse circumstances.

To get your ledger misplaced, your interests will go awry through neglect of duty.

To dream that your ledger gets destroyed by fire, you will suffer through the carelessness of friends.

To dream that you have a woman to keep your ledger, you will lose money trying to combine pleasure with business.

For a young woman to dream of ledgers, denotes she will have a solid business man to make her a proposal of marriage.

To dream that your ledger has worthless accounts, denotes bad management and losses; but if the accounts are good, then your business will assume improved conditions.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

RESTORATION

Taking that which was destroyed and forming it into a rare new beauty, spiritually... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

CLOSET

(Safe) In a dream, a closet represents one’s wife, a hide-out, protection or a veil. Ifone sees his closet destroyed in a dream, it may mean the death of his wife. Acloset in a dream also represents a made, keeping secrets, confidentiality or intimacy between husband and wife, protecting the reputation of chaste women, beautiful garments or it could represent the day and the night.

If one puts something in a closet in a dream, it means that he will find it there when he needs it.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

COLLAPSING WALLS

Ifone sees the walls of his house collapsing as a result of a flood in a dream, it means the death of his wife. Ifone sees his house caving in on him and causing a big cloud of dust in a dream, it means that he maybe afflicted with measles.

A collapsed ceiling in a dream means devastation.

If one sees a destroyed house standing erect anew in a dream, it means spiritual awakening of its owner.

If one is awaiting the return of a member of his family, or if he is awaiting a guest to arrive, and if a part of his house caves in, it means the near arrival of such a traveller. Ifa daughter or a sister or another woman live in that house, it means that the guest will seek her hand for marriage.

If a hurricane destroys his entire house in a dream, it means that death will take locality in that place at the hands of a tyrant. Ifone sees himself demolishing an old house or edifice in a dream, it means evil.

If a woman sees her walls caving in on her in a dream, it means the death of her husband.

(Also see Destruction)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

CRUMBLING

In a dream, seeing a mountain or an edifice or a mausoleum breaking into pieces or being destroyed without an outside interference or blasting, it means fading of one’s name or evanescence of one’s remembrance after his death or disappearance of one’s traces or references. Crumbling in a dream also means fulfilling one’s promise.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

DEATH

Death in the dream symbolises corruption of a person’s Deen while there will be glory, rank and honour for him in the world if such death is not accompanied by mourning, weeping, the carrying of a bier or corpse or the act of burying.

If the corpse is seen as buried, it means there is no more hope for the improvement of his Deeni matters: the devil will take charge of his life and he will be overwhelmed by the quest of material wealth. Also the same number of people will be influence by the dreamer who number he had seen following his bier. He will dominated and subjugates them.

On the contrary, if death is not accompanied by anything that suggest burial, mourning, weeping, giving of ghusl, takfeen, the carrying of the bier or corpse, it may mean that a portion of his house will be destroyed, or its wall or its timber will fall down. Some interpreters have said that perhaps he will weaken in the matter of his Deen and he will lose his insight and prudence.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

DESTRUCTION

(Admonition; Cave in; Earthquake; Harvest; Violation) In a dream, destruction means dispersion of people, or it could mean death. Destruction in a dream also means the leveling of a town or the death of its ruler or it could represent absence of justice. Experiencing destruction in a dream means sufferingfrom the persecution of people one cannot bear. Seeing a city destroyed by an earthquake in a dream represents the carrying of a death sentence for someone there, or it could mean violation of people’s rights or freedom in that town.

If one sees an entire town being destroyed with its urban area, factories and fields in a dream, it means that the people of that town have gone astray, or that its leaders are struck with calamities. On the other hand, if one sees it flourishing in a dream, then it reflects the spiritual awareness and religious devotion of its people.

(Also see Collapsing walls; Cloud of destruction)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

LOSING SIGHT

(Blindness) If one sees in his dream as though the world is totally destroyed and that he remained alone therein, it means that he may lose his sight.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

LOT

(God’s prophet Liit; Nephew of God’s prophet and bosom friend Abraham, upon both of them be peace) Seeing the prophet Lot in a dream means distress and trouble caused by one’s own people and wife, or perhaps it could mean victory over one’s enemy and witnessing God’s wrath toward them. Seeing the prophet Lot in a dream also denotes obliteration of a nation, effacement, earthquake and destruction if the people who displease their Lord and follow the conduct of the dwellers of the two cities of Sodom and Gomorrah. Seeing the prophet Lot’s wife in a dream means that one’s wife will rebel against him and strive to destroy his life and perhaps she will also be destroyed during that process.

If everyone sees Lot’s wife in a dream, it means that evil will spread among the women of that land. Seeing the prophet Lot, upon whom be peace, in a dream also denotes a warning against sodomy, and it means that one’s wife is a corrupt woman.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

THE STONE OF A RING

If symbolises beauty and adornment.

If the ring is seen destroyed but not the stone, it means a person will lose what he owns but the people will continue to talk about its beauty.

It is also said that the stone of a ring symbolises a person’s son through whom he will enjoy popularity amongst the people.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

THEFT OF A RING

If the ring is stolen or destroyed his business and livelihood will be disrupted. And he will find himself in straitened circumstances.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

TRUE INCIDENT

this incident is related to a group of people living on the Island of Saqliyyah .

It is narrated that their king was bent on annihilating the Muslims.

For this, he prepared a powerful navy comprising of thousands of soldiers. At this point he saw a dream in which he saw himself mounted on an elephant while drums were beaten and trumpets were blown before him. When he awoke he summoned some of his clergymen and asked them to interpret the dream. They gave him the glad tiding of victory. He demanded proof from them for their interpretation.

The said that the elephant is the most powerful animal on land and mounting such a powerful animal means becoming the master of power and strength. And the beating of drums and blowings of trumpets are signs of happiness, ecstasy and victory. Also drums are only beaten in the presence of asking if there is some reason for happiness.

When the king heard this, he became both surprised and delighted. He then summoned some Jewish ulama and asked them for their interpretation. They also interpdreted the dream as a glad tiding of victory. He then called some Muslim ulamaa and demanded that they interpret the dream. They all pointed to an experienced aalim to respond to the king’s demand.

The aalim said to the king that he would interpret the dream only if he guaranteed their safety which he did.

The learned aalim interpreted the dream thus; “O king, I see no wisdom in your wanting to kill the Muslims and marching on them for this purpose. Please do not deploy your army for they will not return to you alive. They will be defeated and destroyed. And do not for one moment think that I give this interpretation because I am a Muslim”.

The king asked him for proof to which he replied that the Holy Book of Allah was the source for his proof. He quoted the verse: Have you not seen what your Lord had done to the people of the elephants. He recited the entire Soorah Feel.

The king said: “This is your proof regarding the elephants. What have you to say about the drums?” He recited the verse: And when the trumpet will be blowns, this will be a very hard day for the non-believers-not an easy one.

When the king heard this he became utterly shocked and perplexed since the shaikh’s explanation was rational and irrefutable.

To avoid embarrassment to himself he dismissed the sheikh and his colleagues saying that he would have believed him if he (the sheikh) were not a Muslim. But since he is a Muslim he is biased in his delivery of interpretation.

The Shaikh said: “You will soon find out for yourself, o king!”.

When the sheikh and his colleagues departed the king began to ponder deeply about what the sheikh had said. He became convinced and decided not to go ahead with his plans. When the clergy heard of this they approached him and urged him to go ahead with his plan. They reasoned with him not to believe the interpretation of the sheikh as he was a Muslim and a Muslim would obviously be opposed to king Muslims. They also sought his permission to kill the sheikh which he refused. They continued to incite him against the Muslim and urged him to go ahead with his plans. He had no choice but to accede. He deployed a huge army under the command of his son.

The two sides met in the middle of the sea.

For three days a fierce battle ensued between the Muslims and non-Muslims. One the third day the Christians army was defeated. Not a single person was spared. When the king came to learn about this, he called for the sheikh and admitted his folly before him. He then secretly accepted Islam at his hands and bestowed many of his favours on him.

It is said that he also learned the Holy Qur’aan by the Shaikh and this affair of the king became popular in Saqliyyah.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

VILLAGE

(City; Suburban area; ‘I’own) A village in a dream represents injustice that will be followed by destruction as a consequence of people’s sins. Entering a well fortified village in a dream means fighting with someone. Crossing a village into a city in a dream means changing a menialjob into a more respectable one, or perhaps it could mean downgrading a good deed one has performed, thinking of it as unimportant, or regretting it, or it could mean doing something good and thinking of it as evil, or perhaps it could mean showing indecisiveness and doubt. Entering a village in a dream also means governing it, or presiding over its people, or it could mean commencing a new job. Walking out of a village in a dream means escaping from evil. Seeing a destroyed village in a dream means heedlessness or a calamity caused by the sins of its dwellers. Seeing a well-built village in a dream shows the piety and righteousness of its people. Seeing ancient edifices or ruins inhabited again in a dream represents people’s repentance from sin. Avillage in a dream also could signify injustice, innovations, corruption, disregarding the divine laws, or discarding the moral standards set by the community.

A village in a dream also could represent ants’ underground nest or colony, while an anthill in a dream represents a village.

If a village is completely destroyed by fire, or floods, or freezing temperature, or by locusts, or plagues in one’s dream, it means suffering under the oppression of an unjust ruler or a tyrant, or it could mean destroying an anthill. Moving from a village into a city in a dream means leaving one’s toiling and hardships behind him. Moving from a city into a village means the opposite, and signifies leaving comfort and safety to meet with discomfort and fear.

(Also see City)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

WORLD

(Creation; Lower world; Material; Woman) In a dream, the world represents a woman, and a woman represents the world, Ifone sees himselfdeparting from this world in a dream, it means that he may divorce his wife.

If one sees the world as totally destroyed and that he is the only remaining soul in it in a dream, it means that he may lose his sight. Ifone sees as though the entire world is placed before him to take whatever he desires from it in a dream, it means that he may become poor, or that he may die shortly after that dream. Seeing the world in a dream also means distractions, jokes, deception, arrogance, negating promises, failing one’s promises, theft, cheating, trickery, sufferings, a prostitute, adversities, sickness, paying fines, mental depression, limitations, appointments, dismissals, or disappointments. It also may be interpreted as one’s wife, child, material growth, business success, good harvest, awakening, victory, love, or a beloved with two faces. Whether the world appears beautiful or ugly in one’s dream, it could mean any of the above interpretations. Seeing the world in one’s dream also could be a divine guidance, showing the person what he or she must see and understand in this world.

If one sees himself walking away from the world in the dream, it means that he may become a renunciate. Ifone embraces the world in the dream, it means that he will amply satisfy his desire for it. Ifone sees himselfrunning after it and the world running away from him in the dream, it means that the world will ultimately deceive him and lead him into temptation. In a dream, the world also represents the holy Qur’im, which is the radiant full moon of this world.

(Also see Travels) ... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

DRAGON 

This large, mystical creature may represent large and mystical forces inside of you. In the Far East it is believed that the dragons are spiritual creatures that navigate through the air and through the sky. In the West, dragons are considered to be dangerous creatures that need to be destroyed. As far as dream symbols go, the dragon may represent the enormous power in your unconscious. It could symbolize repressed unconscious material, including fear. However, the dragon in our dreams is generally a positive symbol. It may represent a period of time when the dreamer will confront his fears and empower himself to effectively cope with negative emotions, extreme materialism, and be able to obtain greater inner and outer freedom.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

MOTH

A moth is not very attractive, desirable, or known for many positive attributes. There is the story of a moth being attracted to the flame, which got to close to the flame and was destroyed.

The moth in your dream may be pointing out a personal weakness or may be bringing to light a deception in your life. It could be suggesting that you are being lead to a place where you will be hurt unless you recognize the danger. Since dreams are very rarely literal, the danger could be emotional or psychological, not necessarily physical.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

SHACKS

Dreaming of old buildings ready to be destroyed is a warning of major health problems. These illnesses are a result only of bad habits and/or a conscious lack of medical care.... Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

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Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

DREAMS AND ANCIENT

Greece Antiphon, a Greek living in the fourth century bc. wrote the first known descriptive book of dreams. It was designed to be used for practical and profes­sional interpretations. He maintained that dreams are not cre­ated by supernatural powers but natural conditions. In the second century ad a similar book was written by Anemidorus, a Greek physician who lived in Rome. He claimed to have gathered his infonnation from ancient sources, possibly from the Egyptian dream book dating from the second millennium bc. He may have used works from the Assurbanipal library, later destroyed, which held one of the most complete collec­tions of dream literature. Anemidorus classified dreams into dreams, visions, oracles, fantasies and apparitions. He identi­fied two classes of dreams: the somnium, which forecast events; and the insomnium, which are concerned with present matters.

For the somnium dreams Anemidorus gave a dream dictionary.

For example, he said abyss meant an impending danger, a dream of warning, and to see a candle being lighted forecasts a binh, to exhibit a lighted candle augers content­ment and prosperity, a dimly burning candle shows sickness, sadness and delay. This last interpretation is taken from folk­lore of the times and, because dreams tend to use commonly used verbal images, was probably true. He maintained that a person’s name—that is their identity, and the family, national and social background from which they arose—has a bearing on what their dream means.

Plato (429-347 bc) said that even good men dream of un­controlled and violent actions, including sexual aggression. These actions are not committed by good men while awake, but criminals act them out without guilt. Democritus said that dreams are not products of an ethereal soul, but of visual impressions which influence our imagination. Aristotle (383— 322 bc) stated that dreams can predict future events. Earlier Hippocrates, the ‘father of medicine’, discovered that dreams can reveal the onset of organic illness. Such dreams, he said, can be seen as illogically representing external reality.

Hippocrates was born on the island of Kos. On the island was the famous temple dedicated to Aesculapius, the god of medicine. There were about 300 such temples in Greece alone, dedicated to healing through the use of dreams. Hip­pocrates was an Aesculapian, and learnt his form of dream interpretation from them. In such temples the patient would ritually have to cleanse themselves by washing, and abstain from sex, alcohol and even food. They would then be led into what was sometimes a subterranean room with harmless snakes in—these were the symbol of the god. In the morning the patients were asked their dream, and it was expected they would dream an answer to their illness or problem. There are many attestations to the efficacy of this technique from pa­tients. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

ASHES

Something has come to an end, has been completely dissolved. Ashes often signify weakness, the loss of vitality, and act as a reminder to enjoy life and have fun. Symbol of the Phoenix, the Bird, who, after total self-condemnation, sets himself on Fire, only to be born again by rising from the ashes. In that sense, the ashes are a sign of rebirth, transformation and, in the last analysis, of Birth, and Death.

One feels burned out, with no interests (depression, as in Abyss and Murder). Insults, disappointments, Illness, and the Death of a loved one can create such dreams. Guilt, blame, and atonement for transgressions (Ash Wednesday, the mark on the forehead). Glowing ashes point to self-reflection and purification.

According to C. G. Jung, ashes were in the olden days seen as protection from demons, particularly against the ghosts of death. In addition, ashes are the product of cremation.

The physical shell must be completely destroyed before the soul can become free.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

BLAZE / FLAMES

Fire. Emotional purification. Psychological and physical energy (flame of life), will. Devastating dangers, destruction, depletion, and transformation. Sexual passion up to and including addiction (“my old flame”); or intense passion. Need for togetherness, or the power to consolidate or remove contradiction. Cremation is said to assist resurrection (See Ashes).

According to the I Ching, fire is that which bonds and radiates.

The fire that Prometheus steals from the gods is seen as a creative act of the human, as is the flame of the Easter candle that is the symbol of God’s power.

According to Germanic mythology, if consciousness fails to rule, the world will be set ablaze and consumed by a great fire. Purification, on the other hand, takes place in the fire in purgatory. It separates the sin from the sinner.

According to the alchemists1 interpretation, it is God Himself who glows in divine love in the flame of the fire. Also, according to Jung, hell is fire, since everything is destroyed there.

The fire in hell is a symbol of eternal pain; the fire in purgatory is the fire of purification. In Frazer’s The Golden Dough are many references to cleansing, Light, and fertility, related to the powers of fire.

For the Mayans, fire is the mother of the gods, residing in the center of the earth.

The image of the “fire mother” can be found in many cultures. According to Jung, fire is the true symbol of life, the center of life, the place where it is warm and light, where people assemble; that’s where you can warm yourself and cook something. It gives protection; it is the essence of being home. Fire is the primeval component and vitality of human beings.

As a male symbol, fire is brightness, the connection to the light, the Sun, and, in particular, to Lightning (Zeus and Wotan). Fire symbolizes the power of passion and action in the archetypal man and woman.

According to Freud, it is often connected with bed- wetting.

Folklore: A serious warning to be careful.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

DESCENT

This is the world of instincts and physical perceptions. As in Abyss, Cliff, Diving, we are talking here about delving into the unconscious. This image often points to the world of the feminine and is a warning that the male archetype is too dominant. Women, particularly, but men as well, will find their center and their own identity deep within themselves.

Social or economic decline. Fear of being destroyed. How did you descend? Where did you end up? Be clear about what you really want and where you can get the energy needed for the task.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

FALLING

A warning not to be such a realist. It might be better to just let go, as in Abyss, Cliff, Shot, Parachute, Flying, and be more open to something new. Also fear of being destroyed, as in Descent. Points to loss due to miscalculation on the part of the dreamer (see the myth of Daedalus and Icarus) or is a sign of unjustified euphoria and arrogance. This symbol often appears in dreams during times when a person has difficulty achieving orgasm and during acute midlife crisis.

Doubt and insecurity. You need to let go, as in Brook, Leaf, and Parachute. Dreams of falling often appear if you are in the process of transition to a new stage in life. Particularly when you are trying out something new, you will first, just as in the dream, fall flat on your face.

A falling dream happens again and again if you are fighting against your own limitations.

It is very helpful to change falling dreams into flying dreams.

According to Freud, falling dreams are always sexual. In the case of women, the question revolves around giving in to erotic desires (fallen women). Freud has dealt with the symbol of falling extensively in his Interpretation of Dreams.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

MURDER / MURDERER

1- We may be denying, or trying to control, a part of our own nature that we do not trust. We may also have feelings about other people which can only be safely expressed in dreams.

If we ourselves are being murdered a part of our lives is completely out of balance and we are being destroyed by external circumstances.

2- To be angry enough to kill suggests that we arc still holding some kind of childhood anger, since it is quite natural for a child to wish somebody dead.

If we are trying to murder somebody else in a dream, we first need to understand what that person represents to us before recognising the violence of our own feelings.

3- Wilful destruction is the relevant symbol here. Spiritually we need to take a look at what is in our path.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

LAVENDER

(see Flowers, Garden, Herbs)

Love and passion. During the Middle Ages, this was commonly used as an aphrodisiac or addition to love potions. Sprigs were also worn by prostitutes to attract business.

Today people use lavender to protect their clothes from moth infestation. What is it that you need to take out of storage and safeguard before it is destroyed?

Cleansing of some type. In Latin, the word for lavender means “to wash,” and Greeks and Romans favored lavender in the bath houses.

Improved moods. In aromatherapy, the scent of lavender is applied to ease melancholy.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

BOMBS

Bombs going off may represent a big shock thai destroyed what you have built.

A bomb might appear in a dream after a serious loss, such as the loss of a relationship or a necessary declarauon of bankruptcy. Waiting for the bomb to go off in a dream may mean that there will soon be repercussions of actions you have taken.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

EGGS

Eggs represent fertility and may comment on the rewards gathered from your endeavors.

The egg is the symbol of birth and regeneration.

A broken egg may represent an opportunity that was destroyed before you were able to benefit from it. Associated with Easter, eggs are a symbol of the resurrected Christ. They may signify good luck.

A dozen eggs may represent multiplicity... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

BAROMETER

Depth Psychology: Seeing a barometer with the temperature climbing rapidly: you are under great pressure.

The barometer is destroyed: a change in your life can’t be avoided. Examine who or what is putting you under so much pressure in real life and resolve the situation.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

FLOWERS

Vision: Picking flowers means material success and a pleasant emotional experience. Seeing a bouquet of fresh flowers: good luck in love and friendship. Decorating yourself with flowers means the deepening of a relationship with a loved one. Tearing flowers off a plant: you are destroying (or have destroyed) your own happiness. In a woman’s dream, flowers stand for great expectation and hope in matters of love.

If the woman is picking flowers it means she is hoping that her secret wishes (sometimes the material kind) will be fulfilled.

Depth Psychology: Dreams about flowers point to something positive within you. It might also refer to a very private, personal experience that is, in real life, related to flowers.

The more beautiful the flowers, the richer your emotional world and your ability to love.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

FORT

Vision: Dreaming about a fort means hostilities.

A fort under construction: the government of your country is in a political crisis.

A destroyed fort: the sign of a past unhappy memory, lack of self-worth.

Depth Psychology: The fort symbolizes your fear of difficulties or a need for security and protection.

A fort in ruins is a sign of lack of self-worth.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

HOUSE

Symbol: Like a town or temple, a house stands for the center of the world and a reflection of your universe.

Vision: The condition of the house represents your present situation.

The roof of the house refers to the state of your health, the exterior to your external appearance.

The upper floor stands for your forehead (and brain); the middle floor the area of the chest, the first floor the intestines, and the ground floor and base- ment the legs and feet.

If you dream of old houses frequendy, you are afraid of old age. Building a house together with other people: you have good friends at your side. Looking at an empty house: you have missed a few opportunities. Tearing down a house: you are strong enough to deal with the ol>stacles that come your way. Living in a run-down house: pay more attention to your health. Watching a house collapse: you won’t reach your goals—be prepared for losses. In a man’s dream, the house (it does not matter if it is a luxurious villa or a farmhouse) represents ambitions, professional advancement, security, and safety. In a woman’s dreams, the balcony is the chest.

Depth Psychology: The house in a dream is the symbol for the Body and what happens with the body.

A house in ill repair, destroyed, or even on fire, points to your poor health and should be taken seriously.

The foundation is a symbol for the mental/intellectual “foundation’ on which you have built your life.

The basement is the symbol of the unconscious, where repressed urges and cravings hide.

The kitchen is the place where “life is lived” every day and where diversion can be found.

The bedroom represents attitudes toward sex and emotional connections to other people.

The living room stands for recreation, rest, and relaxation.

The bathroom is the place for moral cleansing and the “washing away” of disappointments.

The toilet stands for “letting go” of emotional ballast, tensions, and the past.

The roof (and attic) stands for your mental/spiritual part, and symbolizes protection from the outside world. See Door, Furniture, Stairs, Window.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

ABBEY

A dream in which an abbey is depicted reveals your overall state of happiness and complacency. It represents the spiritual, serenity, freedom from stress and worries and the certainty of assistance. If, however, the abbey is depicted as shattered or destroyed, this insinuates the distortion and collapse of your aspirations and dreams.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

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Dream Symbols and Analysis

SHACKS

To see shacky old buildings ready to be destroyed, or torn down, is a sign of the dreamer allowing his habits to tear down his personal house, (the body), and it bodes bad news and ill health for the dreamer unless the dreamer drastically changes his/her ways in a hurry; with a dream like this you can expect impending disaster to your health due only to bad habits or dissipation.... Encyclopedia of Dreams

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Encyclopedia of Dreams

COAL

This is a warning of danger.

If you dream that you are in a Coal-pit, it is serious, and means heavy business losses, or a keen disappointment in love.

To see Coal burning brightly in a grate is, however, a fortunate sign, as the sinister black colour has been destroyed.... Mystic Dream Book

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Mystic Dream Book

AMMUNITION

Dreams of ammunition symbolize that you are on the defensive in your life. Perhaps you’ve been firing verbal attacks or feeling the need to protect yourself from caustic energy that is being fired at you. Keep in mind that which goes around comes around, and the only thing that can be threatened or destroyed is the ego.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

SHARK

Dreams of a shark represent a fear of death, of being destroyed, overpowered and devoured. Sharks represent the aspect of you that is merciless. This dream can be warning you of sharks/untrustworthy people in your business.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

WATER TUB / RESERVOIR / TANK

interpreted upon 5 sides: a man helpful to the people, rich man or collected wealth, or scholar that serves the people by his knowledge. And contingently indicative of / signifies the doing of good deeds [if] the reservoir was built, and indicative of the opposite of that [if] it was destroyed.... Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

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Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

MURDER / MURDERER

Material aspects: We may be denying, or trying to control, a part of our own nature that we do not trust. We may also have feelings about other people, which can only be safely expressed in dreams.

If we ourselves are being murdered, a part of our lives is completely out of balance and we are being destroyed by external circumstances. Consult the entries for anger, emotions and kill for further clarification.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

VANDAL / VANDALIZE

Spiritual vandalism takes place when our basic beliefs are destroyed or trashed. Under these circumstances the dream content will have a sense of violence and violation.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

HAIR

General Meaning: Hair is a good picture of the image we present to the world.

It is amazing how much a person’s looks change simply by changing their hair.

Dreams Positive:

To dream that you are changing your hair is an indication that you are going through a change in your personal image.

• How you feel about this change in your dream will tell you if you are in conflict about this change or if you feel ready for it.

• To dream of having beautiful hair that you enjoy having means that you are feeling confident in who you are.

Negative: To dream that your hair is damaged, ruined or destroyed is a picture of a conflict you are going through.

• It could be that you are feeling insecure about your image at the moment. It could also be an indication of some insecurity that is coming up inside of you.

• Perhaps there are circumstances in your life that are bringing up old conflicts from the past, or situations where you are at a point of weakness and you feel vulnerable.

Visions Positive:

A woman’s hair is a picture of her covering. This speaks firstly of her husband, and then of any other spiritual covering that she is under.

• If you have a vision or prophetic dream of your hair growing, it speaks of the blessing you will walk in as you come under the covering of your husband or spiritual authority.

• 1 Corinthians 11:15 But if a woman has long hair, it is a honor to her: for her hair is given to her for a covering.

Negative: It was shameful for a man to have long hair in the Bible. He was seen as rejecting his masculinity.

The same stigma remains even into today’s society.

• To have a prophetic dream or vision of having long hair, is an indication that you are failing to rise up as the head of your home.

• 1 Corinthians 11:14 Does not even nature itself teach you that if a man has long hair it is a shame to him? • As hair is also a picture of spiritual covering, if you as a man dream that you lose your hair, it is a picture of not being under authority.

See also: Baldness.... The Way of Dreams and Visions

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The Way of Dreams and Visions

DESTROY

A sort of contrary dream in that it is an unfortunate omen if you break or destroy anything not your own property.

To see or find it destroyed signifies an unexpected triumph or gain.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

FLOOD

Water symbolizes the emotional part of our unconscious. So to dream of a flood indicates that an emotion that is too intense has become too much for you, especially if the current takes you and you are unable to stop it. You must try to dominate this feeling or find a means of expression or relief, such as art or relaxation, that allows you to bring it out without emotional explosions. In this way, the flood will become illumination and inspiration.

If you don’t watch them, your emotions could ruin more than one project. You must not forget of course the nourishing effect of water (such as what happens in a baptism). In this way, the dream could represent the start of a new stage of life. (See WATER or DROWNING)

The story of Noah’s ark and other similar ones represent the purge to obtain

something better. After a flood, all the old has been destroyed.

It is the moment to start anew.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

WALNUT

(nut)

The shape of this nut suggests a human skull and brain. It also symbolizes the effort needed to achieve what you desire. The walnut shell, on the other hand, represents the ego that must be destroyed for the emergence of the spiritual self (the fruit).

If the nut is green, it is impossible to open. But if it is ripe, a small tap can open it. Similarly, spirituality emerges when the person is truly ready.

According to popular superstition, this dream portends that you will receive money.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

HOUSE

Anything that is a home in a dream connects to your sense of self.

A house is a clear reflection of identity at the time of the dream.

The sense of identity that the dream is trying to express relates directly to the qualities of the house as it appears in the dream.

A house from your past and / or childhood relates to your identity as it was generated at the time you lived there.

A house from your imagination also relates to your sense of self, and you must use the context of the dream to inform you of the meaning to associate with it.

A mansion is an expanded sense of self, while something small or more rundown is asking you to look at issues of self-worth.

A house under construction is the self being built up, whereas one that is being destroyed takes on the view of deconstruction or reinvention.

The same ideas should be applied to any living space, from an apartment to a hotel room, a great big house or a hovel.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

SUPERSTITIONS

Bad luck superstitions have been around for centuries and vary from culture to culture. Here are some of the most common in Western culture and their appearance in your dream may, depending on the context and mood of the dream, be a sign of misfortune or of the need to be cautious and consider all your options before moving ahead

Friday the thirteenth: The Scandinavians believed that the number thirteen was unlucky due to the twelve mythological demigods being joined by a thirteenth, an evil one, who brought misfortune upon humans. It was also said that Christ was crucified on Friday and the number of guests at the party of the Last Supper was thirteen, with the thirteenth guest being Judas, the traitor.

Walking under a ladder: A leaning ladder forms a triangle with the wall and ground. Triangles represent the Holy Trinity, and violating the Trinity by breaking it (walking through it) would put you in league with the Devil himself.

Black cats: Although sometimes thought to be a symbol of good luck (in ancient Egypt, the Goddess Bast was a black, female cat), during the Middle ages cats were thought to be demons in disguise and should thus be destroyed.

Spilling salt: Salt used to be an expensive commodity used mainly for medicinal purposes. For this reason, spillage was to be avoided at all costs. The idea that it is unlucky to do so probably stems from the belief that Judas spilt salt during the Last Supper.

Other superstitions associated with bad luck and misfortune include: A bat flying into the house. An owl hooting 3 times. 3 butterflies together. Looking at the new moon over your left shoulder. A 5-leaved clover. Breaking a glass whilst proposing a toast. Putting a shirt on inside out. Red and white flowers together. Hearing a rooster crow at night. Cutting your nails on a Friday.

Putting a hat on a bed. Getting out of bed left foot first. Violets blooming out of season. A picture falling. Breaking a mirror. Singing before breakfast. Opening an umbrella indoors. Giving away a wedding present. Stepping on cracks in the sidewalk. An itch inside your nose. Crossed knives. Seeing an owl during daylight. Spilling pepper. Killing a sparrow. Black birds.

Dropping a wedding ring. Breaking a plate, especially if it has not already been cracked. Mending a garment whilst wearing it. Signing contracts in the months of April, July or November. Spilling ink. Breaking a bottle.

Fastening a button into the wrong buttonhole. A candle falling over. Stepping on board a ship with your left foot. Tripping over when you leave your house.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

PRECOGNITIVE DISASTER DREAMS

The following precognitive disaster dreams certainly challenge our preconceptions and rational explanations about how the world and the dreaming mind relate to one another.

In his book Recollections of Abraham Lincoln, 1847-1865, Ward Hill Lamon relates a dream Lincoln had shortly before his death. In the dream, Lincoln heard a group of people mournfully weeping downstairs in the White House, but when he went to investigate, he found no mourners, although their desperate weeping continued. Upon entering the East Room he discovered a corpse wrapped in funeral vestments. Demanding of one of the soldiers stationed there, ‘Who is dead in the White House?,’ he received the reply, ‘The President. He was killed by an assassin.’ A day before the SS Titanic’s demise, a woman on the infamous ship dreamt of the horrible event that was to occur the next day. She told her husband, who scoffed at her worries and ignored her pleas. However, the dream so affected her that she secretly prepared herself the night before and had all her children sleep in their warm clothes in order to be ready at a moment’s notice. During the night, after the ship struck the iceberg, she and her children were rescued and escaped the sinking ship. Her husband, sadly, went down with more than 1,500 people.

In 1914, one hundred and twenty Newfoundland sealers were abandoned on an ice-floe in the North Atlantic during winter. The incompetence of the ship’s captain, and of other crew members, meant that the missing men were not noticed for two days and two nights. By the time they were rescued, more than half were dead. It was the worst disaster to strike the Newfoundland sealing community in many years. However, the disaster did not come without warning. One of the fiftyfive survivors later told of a dream he had two weeks before the disaster. According to Cassie Brown’s report on the disaster: ‘John Howlet had suffered a chilling nightmare weeks before. In his dream he was on a mountain of ice, lost and freezing. He was alone, terribly and frighteningly alone, but everywhere he wandered there were vague, indefinable “things” on the ice around him—things with no particular shape that he could make out. He found himself walking among those things, unable to find his way, wondering what they were and dreading them. In his dream he was counting, counting, counting…He was still counting the white mounds when he awoke, shivering and terribly depressed.’

Unfortunately, even this dream did not make him avoid joining the crew of the ship, Newfoundland, most of whom would be dead in a matter of days. It was only afterwards he realized that the bodies covered with snow were the white mounds from his dream.

In his autobiography, Jung recounts disturbing dreams and visions in 1913. In one vision he witnessed a monstrous flood covering Germany and realized a catastrophe was in progress. ‘I saw the mighty yellow waves, the floating rubble of civilization, and the drowned bodies of uncounted thousands. Then the whole sea turned to blood.’ Jung said he was perplexed and nauseated, assuming this vision was personal. It was not until World War I broke out a year later that he realized its collective nature. This irrational experience led Jung to conclude that each person’s unconscious possesses not only a personal, but also a collective, dimension.

Probably one of the best-established and most reputable cases of premonitions of disaster comes from the grim events that occurred on 21 October 1966 in Aberfan, Wales. On that day, 116 children and twenty-eight adults were killed when a large mountain of coal collapsed and buried a small section of the town of Aberfan, including an elementary school filled with children. The disaster touched nearly every family in the town and effectively extinguished an entire generation of children. After the disaster, the reports of premonitions began to flood in. The mother of one of the deceased students reported that her ten-year-old child (who died in the disaster) had a dream the night before which foretold the disaster. The child told her mother, ‘I dreamed I went to school and there was no school there.

Something black had come down all over it.’

The reports of precognitive dreams literally came from all over Wales and England. One lady had a nightmare that she suffocated in ‘deep blackness’. Another dreamed of a small child being buried by a large landslide. Another clearly saw a schoolhouse be buried by an avalanche of coal, and rescue workers digging frantically for survivors. Another woke up from a nightmare in which she was being buried alive. On the morning of the disaster, Mrs Sybil Brown woke from a dream in which she saw children being overcome by ‘a black, billowing mass’. Probably the clearest of the premonitions was reported by a man in north-west England who claimed that the night before the disaster he had a dream which consisted only of letters being spelled out in dazzling light: A-B-E-R-F-A-N. At the time, the dream had no meaning to him. Hours later, he would realize with horror what it meant.

An interesting phenomenon occurred in the aftermath of the terrorist plane attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center and damaged the Pentagon on 11 September 2001: numerous people came forward with reports of vivid dreams they’d had of these disasters in advance. The dreams were filled with images that later took place: planes crashing into buildings, planes crashing on the ground, tall buildings collapsing, flames shooting out of buildings, people running covered in gray ash, and feelings of panic, mass death and war. These nightmarish dreams were so realistic that many people awoke from them in terror and sweat.

The question most often raised about precognitive disaster dreams is, if so many people dreamed in advance of these disasters, why could nothing have been done to prevent them? The answer is that most people who have precognitive dreams only realize that they have had them after the events the dreams foretold have taken place, and they see how their dreams matched the events. Other dreamers, especially those who have periodic or frequent precognitive dreams, usually do not dream enough specific details to know exactly what is going to happen, where, and when. Some may only have a sense of dread that ‘something terrible’ is going to happen, usually soon. For example, a dream that a tall building is collapsing would not have sparked the immediate connection that terrorists were going to fly planes into the World Trade Center on the morning of 11 September 2001. A dream analyst would more likely interpret the image dream within the context of the dreamer’s life, suggesting that the dream reflected emotional turmoil within the dreamer’s life.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

THE TEN MOST COMMON DREAMS

Anthropologists, psychologists and dream analysts often find similar themes in dreams that appear to transcend all generations and cultures. Whilst not all experts agree on the same list and frequency, the list below is representative of what are generally accepted as common dream themes. You’ll notice that both fantasy and contemporary scenarios appear in the list, and when it comes to interpretation, both the surreal and the everyday can be rich sources of symbolism.

Being chased or attacked
Many people dream of being pursued or attacked, although who or what is attacking or doing the pursuing varies from place to place. These dreams are a natural response to life stress; it could be that events are catching up with you or perhaps you trying to run away from something.

Being lost or trapped
In these very common dreams, you’re lost and feeling desperate. You may be buried alive or locked in a cage. You dream of not being able to move; you’re powerless to scream or breathe. Or you may feel desperate for the toilet and unable to find one. These dreams may occur when you feel confusion or conflict about how to act in waking life.

Being injured, ill or dying
Such dreams may involve deaths of famous people, your parents or children, a lover and even yourself. When you dream about an accidental death of any person, that person’s death symbolizes something in you that is no longer functioning.

It can also suggest new beginnings; out with the old and in with the new. Another common scenario under this theme is of teeth falling out or crumbling.

This might have a physical origin in people gritting or grinding teeth during sleep. Freud suggested that dreams of teeth falling out are related to fears of castration, but women have this dream as often as men.

Other psychologists believe the dream reflects anxiety about your appearance and how others perceive you.

Car or other vehicle trouble
An out-of-control vehicle is a fairly common nightmare among all people and ages, whether or not the dreamers actually drive. Such a dream may occur when the dreamer feels events in waking life are out of control.

House or property, loss or damage
In these dreams, your house is damaged or destroyed by fire, water or other causes. These dreams may surface because you feel that some valuable aspect of waking life is at risk.

Dreams about losing a wallet, watch or cherished piece of jewelry, such as a wedding ring, also fall into this category.

Meanings vary depending on what is lost or damaged. The flip side of this is that dreams about discovering new spaces or rooms in your home, or dreams about repairs or improvements are also common.

These dreams may occur when you feel that some valuable aspect of waking life is improving.

Poor test or other poor performance
You’ve probably dreamed of arriving for a test and found the exam has already started. Or you search fruitlessly for the examination room.

This is a common dream that can occur years after school or college; it usually occurs when you feel you are somehow being ‘tested’ in waking life. Some psychologists think the dreams can denote anxiety about sexual performance.

Falling or flying?
Falling is one of the most common dreams among people of all ages, and may be a reflection of feeling insecure, helpless or of having no support or solid grounding. Some people may actually fall from their beds during this dream.

Dreaming about drowning is less common, and often occurs when a person feels overwhelmed.

Dreams about flying, swimming or dancing are the flip side of falling or drowning dreams. Such optimistic dreams inspire, as the dreamer is lifted to spiritual heights or is filled with creative notions.

Pleasurable swimming may mean freely exploring your depths; dreams of dance may be a metaphor for moving freely through your life.

Being naked in public or inappropriately dressed.
This is a common dream scenario that occurs at all ages, even with children. The dreams involve feelings of exposure and vulnerability, and often include an element of embarrassment or shame.

On the other hand, dreams of wearing a special outfit may suggest you feel good about your body or your life.

Missing the train or connection
You rush to catch a departing bus, train, airplane or ship, only to find it has left without you.

These dreams reflect feelings that you are missing out on something in waking life.

Machine or telephone malfunction dreams are another variation on this theme, often occurring when you feel anxious about making an emotional connection or when you feel you’re losing touch with someone.

Natural or man-made disasters
You’re confronted with overwhelming floods, tidal waves, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tornadoes, hurricanes, bombings or chemical warfare.

These dreams may depict personal problems raging out of control. Dreams of vibrant flowers, verdant hillsides or uplifting music that leaves the dreamer feeling inspired are the flip side of disaster dreams.... Common Dreams

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Common Dreams

CORNFLOWER

As cornflowers are a delicious shade of blue, the color symbolism may suggest calmness and serenity. On the other hand, cornflowers are often presented as dried flowers, suggesting that an aspect of the dreamer’s life has been crushed, damaged or destroyed.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

WHAT DREAMS CAN DO FOR YOU

Your dream world is an invisible but extremely powerful inner resouce, one that you can learn to access freely. You can learn to command and control your dreams, thereby enriching your life immeasurably.

Once upon a time not so long ago, an inventor was struggling with a major problem. His name was Elias Howe, and for years he had been trying to solve this problem, so that he could complete a machine he was building—a machine that would in time change the world. He was missing a small but vital detail, and, try as he would, he just couldn’t figure it out. Needless to say, Howe was a very frustrated man. One night, after another long day of fruitless work on his project, he dreamed he had been captured by fierce savages. These warriors were attacking him with spears. Although in the dream he was terrified he would be killed, he noticed that the spears were unusual looking: each one had an eye- shaped hole at the pointed end. When Howe woke up, it hit him like a brick: he had actually dreamed the answer to his problem. His nightmare was a blessing in disguise. He immediately saw that the eye of the spear could be an eye in a sewing needle, near its point. Elated with the discovery, he rushed to his laboratory and finished the design of his invention: the sewing machine. The rest, as they say, is history.

The list of what dreams can do for you seems endless. We’ve touched on a few of these benefits of dreaming in the preface and introduction. Now let’s go into a bit more detail. I want you to get really excited about your own dream potential. And, once you realize the possibilities, I think you will.

FAMOUS DREAMERS

The history of dreams is filled with stories of famous people who have called on their dreams for help, or who have received help unexpectedly from their dreams. Here are a few more interesting stories to illustrate the point:

The physicist Niels Bohr, who developed the theory of the movements of electrons, had a dream in which he saw the planets attached to the sun by strings. This image inspired him to finalize his theory.

The great Albert Einstein reported that the famous theory of relativity came to him while he was napping—a good reason for taking frequent naps!

Author Richard Bach, who wrote the bestseller Jonathan Livingston Seagull, was stuck in a writer’s block after writing the first half of his now-famous novel. It was eight years later that he literally dreamed the second half and was able to complete his book.

Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman told reporters that his classic film Cries and Whispers had been inspired by a dream.

Another writer, the well-loved British author Robert Louis Stevenson, was quite dependent on his dreams for ideas that he could turn into sellable stories. Stevenson has related in his memoirs that after a childhood tortured by nightmares, and his successful efforts to overcome them, he was able to put his dreams to work for profit.

A born storyteller (though he started out as a medical student), he was accustomed to lull himself to sleep by making up stories to amuse himself. Eventually, he turned this personal hobby into a profession, becoming a writer of tales like Treasure Island. He identified his dream-helpers as “little people,” or “Brownies.” Once he was in constant contact with this inner source, his nightmares vanished, never to return. Instead, whenever he was in need of income he turned to his dreams:

At once the little people begin to bestir themselves in the same quest, and labour all night long, and all night long set before him truncheons of tales upon their lighted theatre. No fear of his being frightened now; the flying heart and the frozen scalp are things bygone; applause, growing applause, growing interest, growing exultation in his own cleverness . . . and at last a jubilant leap to wakefulness, with the cry, “I have it, that’ll do!”

Stevenson wrote his autobiography in the third person, not revealing that he was the subject until the end.

Stevenson further states that sometimes when he examined the story his Brownies had provided, he was disappointed, finding it unmarketable. However, he also reported that the Brownies “did him honest service and gave him better tales than he could fashion for himself,” that “they can tell him a story piece by piece, like a serial, and keep him all the while in ignorance of where they aim.”

Stevenson’s Brownies are a perfect example of dream helpers just waiting to be called upon. A particularly famous example of the work of Stevenson’s Brownies is the tale The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. As he explains:

I had long been trying to write a story on this subject, to find a body, a vehicle, for that strong sense of man’s double being, which must at times come in upon and overwhelm the mind of every thinking creature. [After he destroyed an earlier version of the manuscript . . .] For two days I went about racking my brains for a plot of any sort; and on the second night I dreamed the scene at the window, and a scene afterwards split in two, in which Hyde, pursued for some crime, took the powder and underwent the change in the presence of his pursuers. All the rest was made awake, and consciously, although I think I can trace in much of it the manner of my Brownies.

Although Stevenson did the “mechanical work, which is about the worst of it,” writing out the tales with pen and paper, mailing off the stories to publishers, paying the postage, and not incidentally collecting the fees, he gave his Brownies almost total credit for his productions.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, a British poet, was accustomed to taking a sedative derived from opium (legal in those days). One afternoon after taking a dose he was reading and fell asleep over his book. The last words he read had been, “Here the Khan Kubla commanded a palace to be built.” When Coleridge awoke some three hours later he had dreamed hundreds of lines of poetry, which he immediately set to writing down. The opening lines of this poem—one of the most famous of all time—are:

  • In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
    A stately pleasure-dome decree:
    Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
    Through caverns measureless to man
    Down to a sunless sea.

Unfortunately for posterity, after writing only fifty-four lines of the two to three hundred he had dreamed, Coleridge was interrupted by a caller, whom he entertained for an hour. When he returned to complete the poem, he had lost all the rest of what he had dreamed! In his diary he noted that it had disappeared “like images on the surface of a stream.” Even so, he had written a masterpiece. This true story, however, emphasizes the need to record dreams upon awakening, a subject we will take up in chapters 5 and 6.

Not only artists and writers give their dreams credit for their ideas and inspirations, but many scientists as well (as we saw in the examples of Bohr and Einstein). Psychologist Eliot D. Hutchinson reports numerous cases of scientists receiving information through dreams and says of dreams that “by them we can see more clearly the specific mechanism of intuitive thought,” and that “a large number of thinkers with whom I have had direct contact admit that they dream more or less constantly about their work, especially if it is exceptionally baffling . . . they often extract useful conceptions.”

I personally can attest to this statement, as it mirrors my own experience writing books. For example, when I began work on this book about dreams, I noticed that my dream production immediately doubled; and I have had Stevenson’s experience of “little people,” whom I call my “elves,” and whom I write about extensively in my book for teens called Teen Astrology, telling about how they came to my rescue when I was quite stuck (see chapter 9, pages 249– 252 in that book).

One of the most astonishing as well as fascinating stories is that of Hermann V. Hilprecht, a professor of Assyrian at the University of Pennsylvania in the late 1800s. It seems to be a characteristic of those who receive dream help that they have recently been working long and hard and are frustrated. In Hilprecht’s case, he was working late one evening in 1893, attempting to decipher the cuneiform characters on drawings of two small fragments of agate. He thought they belonged to Babylonian finger rings, and he had tentatively assigned one fragment to the so-called Cassite period of 1700 B.C.E. However, he couldn’t classify the second fragment. And he wasn’t at all sure about the first either. He finally gave up his efforts at about midnight and went straight to bed—and had the following dream, which was his “astounding discovery.”

Hilprecht dreamed of a priest of pre-Christian Nippur, several thousand years ago, who led the professor into the treasure chamber of the temple and showed him the originals, telling him just how the fragments fitted in, all in great detail. Although the dream was long and involved, Hilprecht remembered it all and in the morning told it to his wife. In his words: “Next morning . . . I examined the fragments once more in the light of these disclosures, and to my astonishment found all the details of the dream precisely verified in so far as the means of verification were in my hands.”

Up until then, Hilprecht had been working only with drawings. Now he traveled to the museum in Constantinople where the actual agate fragments were kept and discovered that they fitted together perfectly, unlocking the secret of a three-thousand-year-old mystery by means of a dream!

How did this happen? Clairvoyance? Magic? Who was the priest? How was it that Hilprecht seemed to make contact in a dream with someone who had lived so long before him? We will never know the answers to these questions; but we do know from the professor’s own words that this is exactly what happened to him. (It makes you wonder whether Professor Hilprecht was in the habit of paying attention to his dreams!)

No doubt one of the most famous dream sources of scientific discovery was experienced by the German chemist Friedrich August Kekulé, when he was attempting to understand and model the molecular structure of benzene. Like Professor Hilprecht, Kekulé had been searching for the answer for many years and was totally immersed in the problem. He told of a dream he had while he napped in front of his fireplace one frigid night in 1865:

Again the atoms were juggling before my eyes:
My mind’s eye, sharpened by repeated sights of a similar kind, could not distinguish larger structures of different forms and in long chains, many of them close together; everything was moving in a snake-like and twisting manner. Suddenly, what was this? One of the snakes got hold of its own tail and the whole structure was mockingly twisting in front of my eyes. As if struck by lightning, I awoke.

This dream led Kekulé directly to the discovery of the structure of benzene, which is a closed carbon ring. A dream had presented a realization that served to revolutionize modern chemistry. Later, reporting his discovery to his colleagues at a scientific convention in 1890, he remarked, “Let us learn to dream, gentlemen, and then we may perhaps find the truth.” Not the sort of comment one generally expects from a scientist!

Here is the story of another scientist. Otto Loewi, who won the 1936 Nobel

Prize in Psychology and Medicine for his discovery of how the human nervous system works, credited this discovery to a dream. Prior to Loewi, scientists had assumed that the body’s nervous impulses were the result of electrical waves. However, in 1903 Loewi had the intuition that a chemical transmission was actually responsible. But he had no way to prove his theory, so he set the idea aside for many years. Then, in 1920, he had the following dream:

The night before Easter Sunday of that year I awoke, turned on the light, and jotted down a few notes on a tiny slip of thin paper. Then I fell asleep again. It occurred to me at six o’clock in the morning that during the night I had written down something most important, but I was unable to decipher the scrawl. The next night, at three o’clock, the idea returned. It was the design of an experiment to determine whether or not the hypothesis of chemical transmission that I had uttered seventeen years ago was correct. I got up immediately, went to the laboratory and performed a simple experiment on a frog’s heart according to the nocturnal design:
Its results became the foundation of the theory of chemical transmission of the nervous impulse.

Interestingly, Loewi had previously performed a similar experiment, which combined in his dreaming mind with the new idea, creating the successful result. This is an excellent example of the ability of dreams to combine with previous dreams, or with actual events, to produce fertile new ground.

These are some of the stories of famous people who have used dreams to solve problems, enhance creativity, and even make money and win important prizes. They are all evidence of the vast human ability to make use of dreams. As you draw upon your own dream life and develop skills in both dreaming and interpreting your dreams, you will become an advanced teen dreamer. Think of your dreams as a school where you are continually learning new skills and developing new aptitudes, reaching ever higher levels of achievement.

As you pay conscious attention to your dreams, and then use your dream symbols in your waking life, you will be integrating yourself, creating the greatest artwork of your life: your whole and unique Self.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

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