developing

The meaning of Developing in dream | Dream interpretation


Assurance of advancing development

Dream Dictionary Unlimited | Margaret Hamilton


Developing | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Developing


DISPUTE

To dream of holding disputes over trifles, indicates bad health and unfairness in judging others.

To dream of disputing with learned people, shows that you have some latent ability, but are a little sluggish in developing it.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

SALARY

1. Potential in life.

2. If spending, how one is developing one’s abilities.

3. How one can improve abilities. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

SKULL

1. Great danger.

2. One should work harder in developing one’s mind.

3. In seeking a solution to a problem, seek the help of others. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

AISHA

(Wife of God’s Messenger upon whom be peace, and Motherofthe believers, God be pleased with her) Seeing her in a dream means blessings and bounty.

If a woman sees ‘Aisha in a dream, it means earning a high station, a blessed fame, developing righteousness and earning the love of one’s husband and parents.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

ANGELS

(Celestial beings; Heavenly beings) If one sees the heavenly angels (arb. Malii’ika) coming before him to congratulate him in a dream, it means that God Almighty has forgiven that person his sins and endowed him with patience, through which he will attain success in this life and in the hereafter.

If one sees the heavenly angels greeting him or giving him something in the dream, it means that his insight will grow. or that he maybe martyrized. Ifone sees angels descending upon a locality that is raging with a war in a dream, it means that the dwellers of that place will win victory.

If the people are suffering from adversities, it means that their calamities will be lifted. Flying with angels or visiting the heavens in their company in a dream may mean that one will die in the station of a martyr and receive God’s utmost blessings.

If one feels scared of the angels in his dream, it means that a fight, an argument or awesome trials will befall that locality. In general, to see the angels descending from the heavens to the earth in a dream means enfeeblement of those who have doubt, and strength for those who have faith and certitude.

If one sees the angels prostrating to him in a dream, it means that all his needs will be satisfied and he will be endowed with good conduct, good behavior and a blessed fame.

If one sees them looking like women in the dream, it means that he lies before God Almighty.

If a pious person sees an angel telling him in a dream “Read God’s Book.” It means that one will attain happiness in his life.

If an impious person sees an angel in a dream telling him “Read your own records.” It means that he may goastray. Ifone sees the angels givinghim glad tidings andcongratulating him in a dream, it means that he will beget a blessed son who will grow to be righteous and an example to be followed. Ifone sees a gathering of angels in a town in his dream, it means that a pious man, or an ascetic, or a great scholar will die in that locality.

If one sees himself looking at the angels in the skies in a dream, it means that he may suffer the loss of a son or his wealth. Seeing the celestial angels (arb. Ruhaniyyeen) in a dream means gaining honor, dignity, blessings in one’s life, profits and a good fame, developing spiritual inner insight, or becoming a business manager. Near the end of one’s life, one who sees such a dream also will suffer from people’s slander and backbiting. He will also lose his good reputation to people’s envy and evil qualities and he will live in tight financial conditions.

If one becomes an angel in a dream, it means tat he will receive honor, power, overcome his adversities, dispel his distress and win his freedom, or it could mean that he will rise in station.

If one sees the angels greeting him and shaking hands with him in a dream, it means that God IAlmighty will endow him with wisdom, clarity and insight. Angels in a dream also represent one’s closest witnesses, guardians, police officers or the emissaries of a ruler. Wrestling with an angel in a dream means loss of status. Wrestling with an angel in a dream also means suffering from distress, trouble, humiliation and falling in rank. Seeing angels entering one’s house in a dream means that a thief will burglarize such a house.

If angels disarm someone in a dream, it means that he will lose his wealth and strength, or that he may divorce his wife.

If angels offer the person a tray of fruits in the dream, it means that he will depart from this world as a martyr.

If angels curse someone in a dream, it means that he has little care for his religion. Ifone sees a gathering of heavenly angels together with the angels of hell-fire in a dream, it means enmity and divisiveness.

If a sick person sees himself struggling with an angel in a dream, it is a sign of his death. Ifone sees an angel taking the form of a child in a dream, it represents one’s future.

If he sees an angel as a youth, the youth then represents the present time and whatever events that will take place during it.

If the angel appears in the form of an old man in the dream, he represents the past.

If one sees the angels praying and asking for God’s forgiveness on his behalf in a dream, it means that one’s spiritual and religious life will grow for the better, and that he will become wealthy.

If one sees angels descending upon a cemetery in a dream, it signifies the presence of blessed and righteous souls in that place. Ifone sees angels walking in the markets in a dream, it means that the merchants are trifling with prices and playing with the measures.

If the angels who are in charge of punishing the sinner in hell walk before a dying person and he does not fear them in the dream, it means peace and tranquility.

If one sees the angels teaching a dying person how to recite his final rites in a dream, it means glad tidings and attainment of what his heart desires, a guarantee of his safety, happiness, joy and of having a blessed and a good heart. Ifhe sees them angry with him or beating him or subduing and taming him in a dream, it means that he may revert to sin, earn the displeasure of his parents, disdain from complying with God’s commands, or he could even come to deny the necessity of God’s religion. Such angels in a dream also represent the emissaries of a governor or his deputies.

If a dying person is told in the dream that no angels have come to see him, then it is a testimony of his good character and piety, or it could mean payment of one’s debts or recovering from an illness. Angels in a dream also could represent scholars, gnostics or translators who understand people’s languages and speak in many tongues. As for Munkar and Nakir, the angels who come to one’s grave upon his burial to question him, seeing them in a dream means prosperity for a poor person, and finding work for a jobless person.

(Also see Castration)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

BUCKTHORN TREE

(Genus Zizyphus; Jujube tree; Lotus tree; Shrubs) In a dream, this warm climate buckthorn family tree that grows datelike fruit represents a noble and a generous woman, or a noble and a generous man.

The greener is its color, the greater is such a person. Seeing the buckthorn tree in a dream means rising in station, developing piety and gaining knowledge. Eating its fruit in a dream means that one may fall victim to a sickness. Climbing a buckthorn tree in a dream means depression and adversities.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

CIRCUMAMBULATION

(Ambulate; Ka’aba; Mecca; Walk around) If a sinner sees himself circumambulating God’s House in Mecca in a dream, it means that he will be freed from suffering in hell-fire. Ifone is unmarried, it means that he will get married.

If one qualifies for promotion, it means that he will receive it. Seeingoneselfperforming a pilgrimage in a dream also means circumambulating God’s house in Mecca, developing a good character, living a straight and a worthy life, safety from fear, repayment of one’s debts, delivering entrusted merchandise to their rightful owners or money to its people on demand, being trustworthy, living an ascetic life, fulfilling a promise, atonement for one’s sins, distributing expiatory gifts or interceding on behalfof a trustworthy and a noble Imam. Seeing oneself circumambulating God’s house while riding on a mare in a dream means that one will commit the abominable sin of adultery with a member of his own family or with a consanguineous blood relative with whom it is not permissible to have sexual relationship.

(Also see Ka’aba; Rituals ofthe pilgrimage; Sa’i)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

CLAY

(Argillite; Argillateous; Mortar; Mud; Plaster) In a dream, clay means sickness, disgrace or ignominy, except for one who works with clay or builds structures with it, then in his case, seeing clay in his dream means benefits, religious awareness and developing faith and certitude. Dry clay in a dream represents a cut in one’s earnings or living on a budget.

If one sees himself plastering the walls of his house with wet clay in a dream, it means that he is a righteous person.

If one sees himself eating clay in a dream, it means that he swindles money. Construction clay in a dream means benefits and money. Seeingclay in a dream also could mean death. Ifone sees himselfwaking in mud or wet clay, and ifhe works with it in a dream, it means falling sick or suffering from disgrace. Dry clay in a dream means money, while wet clay means righteousness. Eating baked clay in a dream means backbiting others, untruth or slander.

If a sick person sees clay in his dream, it means his death.

(Also see Bricks)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

DWELLINGS

(Cage; Clothing; House; Luck; Robe) In a dream, dwellings are man’s abode or his world. One’s dwellings in a dream are a reflection of his deeds in wakefulness. Ifone finds himself in anewly built house which is freshly painted and has all the needed amenities and comforts in a dream, it means prosperity.

If he is a poor person, then it means that he will meet his financial obligations with ease.

If he is under stress, it means that he will become free from such burdens.

If he is a craftsman, it means that he will master his craft or acquire authority equal in dominance to the beauty and perfection, size and details of such a dwelling he saw in the dream.lfhe is in sin, it means that he will repent.

The spaciousness or tightness of one’s dwellings in a dream represents his finances, knowledge, sharing, hospitality and generosity.lfone’s own dwellings looked renovated in a dream, it means regaining or developing one’s business for the better. Its fresh paint means fulfilling one’s religious commitments. Its tiles or marble floors represent his pleasures or wife. Dwellings of solid iron cast means longevity and authority.

If one enters an unknown house and finds departed souls dwelling therein in a dream, it means that he has entered the realms of the hereafter.

If such dwellings are built of mud or plaster, this will be a reflection on his adverse conditions.

If one enters such dwellings, then walks out of it in a dream, it means that he will become sick and nearly die of his illness before he recovers from it.

If one walks out of it angry in a dream, it means that he will be imprisoned.

If he sees someone entering his house in a dream, it means that someone will know his intimate life, or that an insolent person will become a close family friend, then betray his trust and have a secret affairs with one’s wife.

If one sees his dwellings crumbling or caving in on him in a dream, it means that he will receive an inheritance from the belongings of a deceased relative. Building a dwelling for oneself or for others in a dream means the death of a relative or of one’s child, or it could mean divorcing one’s wife. Dwellings in a dream also represent a transient station. Ifthe dwelling is built from an unsuitable construction material in the dream, it means that one’s source of income is unlawful. One’s dwellings in a dream also represent his physical form, carnal self and substance. Demolishing a new home in a dream means evil and adversities.

(Also see Cage; Glass house; House)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

EAR

(Awareness; Deafness; Hearing; Stability) One’s ear in a dream represents his hearing, the point of his awareness, his rank, child, property or his status.

The ear in a dream also represents knowledge, reason, religion, extent of one’s wealth, or pride about one’s lineage.

If one’s hearing becomes clearer or increases in sensibility, or ifhe sees light beaming from his ears or driving into them in a dream, this dream will represent his guidance, obedience to his Lord and consent to His command.

If he sees his ears looking smaller or producing an offensive odor in a dream, it means that he may go astray and indulge in actions that will incur God’s displeasure.

If one discovers that he has an extra ear in a dream, it means a permission is given to him to fulfill what he intends.

The number of ears one sees in a dream also represent the different arts and sciences, but they could also mean that the person in question has no stability. In a dream, one’s ear may represent the jewelry a woman attaches to herself as ornaments.

To clog one’s ears with one’s own fingers in a dream means death in a repugnant state of innovation. Plugging one’s own ears in a dream also means ignoring a repulsive thought. Plugging one’s ears in a dream also could mean becoming an advisor to someone or a caller to prayers in a mosque, i.e., a muezzin.

If one’s ears are transformed into an animal’s ears in a dream, it means losing respect or developing inertness or apathy. As one’s awareness, one’s ear in a dream represents a pouch, a wallet, a coffer or a safe. Ears in a dream are also interpreted to mean separation from one’s wife or daughter.

If only half of one’s ear is there in the dream, it means the death of his wife. Ifone finds himselfdeafin his dream, it means that he may lose his faith. Having large ears in a dream means shunning or avoiding what is true. Ifone sees as though his ears have eyes in the dream, it means that he may lose his sight. Ifone sees himself eating the accumulated wax of his ears in the dream, it means that he is a child molester.

If one sees grass growing all over him but does not cover his ears or eyes in the dream, it means prosperity.

(Also see Body’; Earwax)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

FART

(Breaking wind; Passing gas; Foolishness; Wind) Passing gas in a dream means hearing or speaking vile words, or suffering from adversities, or it could mean dispersing a group of people, telling a shocking news, stupidity, belittling people, lies, using insulting words, or it could represent the sound that could emanate from beating someone. Ifone breaks wind with a loud sound in a dream, it means that he will address someone with harsh words.

If one sees himself sitting with people and unwillingly passes gas or breaks wind in a dream, it means that his difficulties, sorrows or stress will be dispelled, though with horridness and repulsiveness.

If one breaks wind intentionally in such a gathering in a dream, then it means committing an evil act and suffering from its consequences.

If one passes gas without noise in his dream, it means that he will receive a sarcastic commendation that matches the smell of his fart. Ifone breaks wind in a dream while sitting with a group of people who are experiencing difficulties, it means that their difficulties will be dispelled, and their suffering will ease.

If they are merchants, it means that their merchandise will move faster. Ifone forces himselfto break wind in a dream, it means that he will carry a burden greater than he can bear.

If one breaks wind along with passing gas in his dream, it means that he will attain success in his life, and he will receive honor and profits from an important business trip. However, it is possible that his interests will become diverse, or that he could lose his focus, then he will return home free from such burdens.

To fart from the mouth in a dream means faltering or a slip of a tongue, an accident, suffering from gum irritation, a stroke that will affect one’s speech, or it could mean developing ill habits that will cause him to feel ashamed of himself in public.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

FLUTE

(Fold; Instrument) In a dream, a flute represents good news.

To hear the sound of a flute in a dream means announcingsomeone’s death. Playing the flute in a dream means developing a good understanding of things.

If one is given a flute in a dream, it means an appointment to a high rankingjob, protection from trials, becoming pious and living an ascetic life.

(Also see Oboe)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

FORTRESS

(Castle; Citadel; Stronghold) A fortress in a dream means obliterating something from its roots or eliminating one’s trouble.

A fortress in a dream also represents a positive power that eliminates negative forces, or it could represent good verses evil. Entering a fortress in a dream also could mean growing in piety or developing ascetic detachment. Seeing a distant fortress in a dream means travelling from one place to another and gaining fame. Taking refuge in a fortress in a dream means victory.

A fortress in a dream also means repenting from one’s sins, or it could represent a great person.

To conquer and capture a fortress in a dream means deflowering a virgin girl.

(Also see Castle; Citadel)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

KAWTHAR

(Plenitude; Abundance; A river in paradise.) To drink from the Kawthar river of paradise in a dream means acquiring knowledge, developing correct deeds, having perfect certitude and truly emulating the leading practices and character of God’s Messenger, upon whom be peace. Drinking from the Kawthar river in a dream also means repentance from sin, abandoning innovations, marriage to a chaste and a pious woman, replacing unlawful earnings with lawful ones, endowment of leadership and victory.

(Also see River)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

MARE

A mare in a dream represents a noble woman.

If one sees himself riding a mare in a dream, it means that he may rape a chaste and a noble woman. In general, a mare in a dream represents people who are known for their honesty and good conduct. Buying a mare in a dream also means getting married. Ifone is already married, then it means that he will own a property or a farm.

A mare in a dream also represents a rich person, a beautiful woman or a handsome looking man, a religious person, a comforting wife, a forbearing husband, or a sick person.

If one loses his mare, or if it dies in the dream, it means that he will lose his source of income. Dismounting a mare in a dream may mean loss of one’s business, a divorce, or loss of one’s house. Hearing the squealing of a mare in a dream means increase in one’s income, or it could mean one’s promotion at work. Drinking the milk of a mare in a dream means developing a beneficial relationship with a politician.

(Also see Donkey; Horse)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

MASK

(Veil) If a man sees himself wearing a mask in a dream, it means that he may commit adultery with his servant or his housekeeper. Wearing a mask in a dream also means developing gratitude and contentment.

(Also see Helmet)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

SALT

(Condiment; Veteran) In a dream, salt means easy money, common people and a good person. Seeing an argument between two adversaries and witnessing salt placed between them in a dream means that they will allay their differences and make peace.

If common salt becomes spoiled in a dream, it means that a plague, injustice, or a drought will befall the people of that locality. Salt in a dream also signifies hard work, or an illness. Table salt in a dream also means asceticism, renunciation and detachment from the material world. It also means blessings, honesty and comfort. Eating bread with salt in a dream means contentment with little from this world.

A salt shaker in a dream represents a good and a dutiful woman. Discovering salt in a dream means adversities and a severe illness. Salt in a dream also represents balance, usability of things and acceptability of everything. This includes knowledge, religion, wife, money, child and lawful earnings. Salt in a dream also means appeasement of one’s fear, peacefulness, developingpatience and forbearance. Salt in a dream also represents a medicine, a remedy, drugs, love, tenderness, unity, compassion, earning suspicious money, or a conspiracy. Receiving a fish preserved in salt in a dream means good news. Olives treated with salt in a dream means recanting one’s promise.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

THREAT

Receiving a threat in a dream means victory over one’s assailant, opponent, or adversary, or it could mean developing a defence mechanism against any danger from that side.

If the threat comes from an unknown person, such a person is a Satan, particularly if the threat is directed against one’s prayers, charitable actions, or devotion.

A threat in a dream also represents the trials of a love story.

(Also see Slapping on the cheek)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

TOOTH

(1) Teeth in a dream represent one’s identity, age, clan, a boy, a girl, his family, money, servants, domestic animals, employees, weapons, life, death, unity, separation, trusts, or savings. In a dream, male’s or female’s upper teeth represent the male members of one’s family from the father’s side, and the teeth of the lower jaw represent the female members of one’s family from the mother’s side.

The closer the teeth are to the incisor, the closer is the relative. Divided in two sections, the upper right incisor represents the father, and the upper left incisor represents the paternal uncle, or it could represent one’s sisters, sons, or a close friend.

The upper canines represent one’s cousin. or two friends who are as close as cousins.

The bicuspids represent one’s uncles from the mother’s side and their children, while the molars represent the grandparents and the grand children.

The lower right incisor represents the mother, and the lower left incisor represents one’s aunt from his father’s side, or they could represent two sisters, two daughters, or two close friends who have the same compassion, concern and love.

The lower canines represent one’s female cousin from either the father or the mother’s side.

The lower canine tooth, or the eyetooth represents the sire of the house, or the landlord.

The upper and the lower molars also represent the furthest members of one’s family, including the grandmother and her grand daughters.

If a tooth moves in its place in the dream, it means an illness.

If it falls, or if it is lost, then it means death of the person to whom it is attributed, or it could possibly mean that he will be separated from him and can no longer see him.

If one saves his lost tooth and does not bury it in the dream, it means that someone will come forth and be to him as good as that relative. Otherwise, ifhe does bury it, then it means the death of his relative.

(2)ln a dream, the human limbs also represent the members of his family, and whatever condition they portray in one’s dream may become visible in the members of his family. Similarly, whatever may affect one’s teeth in a dream can be interpreted as affecting such family members.

If one’s incisors look beautiful and bright in the dream, they denote the power, honor and prosperity his father or uncle will gain.

If extra incisors grow in one’s mouth in a dream, it means that one’s family will grow by either a new born brother or a new son. Ifone finds his teeth slightly deteriorating in a dream, it means a trial, or that his family will engage in a disgraceful act that will bring him shame.

If one attempts to pull out his teeth in a dream, it means that he may spend his money unwillingly, pay a fine, or separate from his parents, thus cutting off his blood ties, or he may become untrue to his relatives.

If one’s teeth turn yellow or black in a dream, such a dream also represents a disgraceful act that will bringshame upon one’s family. Yellow teeth in a dream mean spendingmoney to restore one’s reputation, or it could meanbeing knowledgeable in one’s own esteem. Developing bad mouth odor in a dream represents bad connotations resulting from praises one’s family may receive. Deteriorating teeth in a dream represent weakness in one’s family.

If one sees people biting him in a dream, it means that he could have pretended something in public, though he fortunately restrained himself.

(31If one’s mouth in a dream is interpreted to represent his household, then the teeth of the right side represent the boys, and those on the left side represent the girls. On the other hand, the teeth on the right side could represent the older generation, and the teeth on the left side could represent the younger generation.

The incisors represent the young men in the family, and the canines represent the young girls. As to the molars, they represent elderly people.

If one loses a molar tooth in a dream, it means the death of an elderly person in his household.

(4lHuman teeth in a dream also represent one’s business and management of his life. In that case, the molars represent one’s private life, the eyetooth represents what is semi-public, while the front incisors represent what is openly practiced, one’s public character, words and deeds. Ifone sees his teeth broken in a dream, it means that he pays his debts slowly. Long teeth in a dream mean enmity or a fight between members of one’s household.

If one sees his teeth curved and deteriorating, and if one decides that it is better to pull them out in a dream, it means that he will escape from great adversities and dangers.

If one’s teeth turn gold in a dream, they represent benefits for a teacher or a preacher. Otherwise, golden teeth for everyone else in a dream mean fire, illness, Candida, or an illness that is caused by one’s bile.

If one’s teeth become glass or wood in a dream, it means his death. Ifthey turn silver in the dream, it means harm or losses.

If one’s front teeth fall and new ones grow instead in the dream, they represent major changes in one’s life. Ifone sees himself forcefully pushing his tongue against his teeth in a dream, it means that he speaks ill of his own family, or it could mean problems in one’s house.

If the crown or the enamel of one’s eyetooth is damaged, or if it falls in a dream, it means the death of one’s son.

(‘)Teeth in a dream represent one’s clan, close relatives, or distant cousins.

The molar teeth represent the male members and the incisors represent the female members. Unnecessarily pulling out one’s teeth in a dream means paying a fine, losing one’s capital, or severing relationship with members of one’s family. Discovering one or two cavities in one’s teeth in a dream means that one may beget one or two sons. Developing bad mouth odor in a dream means belittling someone’s ideas, or it could mean a family dispute. Fallen teeth in a dream may denote that the husband and the wife sleep in separate beds, or it may mean poverty, or that one may die in a foreign land, or that the term of one’s life span in this world may be extended.

If one pulls out his teeth and buries them in the dream, it means that his entire clan or family will die before him. Pulling out one’s teeth in a dream also means exposing one’s secrets. Losing a tooth in a dream may imply a punishment for a wrongdoing.

If one finds the teeth of his upperjaw and those ofthe lowerjaw intermixed in the dream, it means that the women control the men in his or family. Flossing one’s teeth in a dream means dispersal of one’s family, or loss of money and property.

If after flossing one’s teeth some meat fiber remains stuck between the teeth in the dream, it means that he backbites his family members.

(8) Teeth in a dream also represent a pearl necklace, a grinder, or an army formation.

The right wing, the left wing and the front assault formation, or they could mean severingblood ties.

The incisorsmay represent the heart of a human being. Teeth in one’s pocket or in the palm of one’s hand in a dream represent one’s brothers.

If one has an incarcerated relative, and ifhe sees his teeth pulled out in a dream, it means the release of his relative from prison. Pulling out one’s teeth in a dream could mean the return of a traveller to his homeland. Tartar in a dream represents weaknesses in the family. Black or broken teeth in a dream mean sorrow caused by one’s relatives. Wisdom teeth in a dream represent one’s followers, while the incisors and the canines represent his wealth, adornment, pride, or child.

The changing of their color into yellow or black in a dream mean changes in one’s life.

If one’s teeth turn into iron in a dream, they mean strength. Losing one’s teeth in a dream also could mean losingone’sjob. Pulling out one’s teeth in a dream so that no one can see them means infertility, or loss of one’s business, loss of one’s savings, a bad relationship with one’s family, an evil act toward one’s family, or it could mean that he will try to sustain his business through a loan, then suffer from bankruptcy. Having a bad tooth in wakefulness and pulling it out in a dream means trying to comfort or appease a difficult person whose hurtfulness will eventually cease. Replacing a tooth with a bridge in a dream means recovering losses, or balancing one’s business. Having an extra tooth in a dream means losing one in wakefulness.

(Also see Body]; Pain; Teeth)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

VETERINARIAN

In a dream, a veterinarian is a person who adorns and beautifies distinguished and honored people, and who supports and assists them in developing strength. Seeing a veterinarian in a dream also means performing a marriage ceremony, travels, a pharmacist or a merchant. In a dream, a veterinarian also means nursing the wounded soldiers in the battlefield.

A veterinarian in a dream also may be interpreted as one’s physician, one who practices righteousness, a wise man, a specialist in setting broken bones, cupping, or practicing bloodletting medicine.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

VICE-REGENT

(Calif; Caliphate; Deputy; Human being; Minister; Ruler; Secretary of state; Vizier) In a dream, a vice-regent represents someone whom people seek for his knowledge, or to learn the mastery of his craft, or he could represent an appointed justice of the peace. He also represents someone who inherits good and bad qualities, or whose character is different privately from the way he portrays himself in public.

If one sees the vice-regent of the land in a stately appearance, or if he sees himself in such a form in a dream, it denotes his good state in this world and his success in the hereafter. Seeing him wearing an unsuitable garment in a dream reflects one’s own state, or it may mean that his current religious state is weak, though it may become better at a latter stage of his life.

A vice-regent or a calif in a dream also represents someone who establishes the laws of his religion and follows the example of God’s Prophet, upon whom be peace. Whatever he is wearing in the dream connotes one’s own state, or the growing or diminishing of his devotion.

If one who is promised something sees the vice-regent or the calif in his dream, it means that his promise will be fulfilled, and his wishes will come true. Seeing him in a dream also means that someone from a different circle is backbiting him, or speaking of him without his consent, or that people are reporting him to the authorities, or that scholars are discussing him, or mentioning his work.

A vice-regent or a calif in a dream also represents aloofness, seclusion, truthfulness, volunteering one’s services, commanding what is good and forbidding what is evil, developing one’s own certitude and faith, repentance, abstaining from sinful actions, imprisonment, sickness, or travels. Ifone sees himself being awarded the seat of the vice-regent or calif in a dream, though he does not suit the position, it means that adversities and temptations will befall the land, though the people of knowledge and the righteous ones will escape such danger. It could also mean that he will suffer humiliation, and that the people whom he manages may rise to preside over him.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

VISITING HOLY SITES

Visiting the Prophet’s Mosque in Medina in a dream means seeking God’s nearness and his pleasure through good deeds. It also means feeling safe, mixing with people of knowledge, associating with people of religious ranks, joining the company of knowledge seekers, and developing sincere love for the family of God’s Prophet, upon whom be peace, serving and loving those who love his progeny. Visiting the Prophet’s Mosque in a dream also means love, knowledge and guidance. Visiting Al-Aqsa Sacred Mosque in Jerusalem in a dream means blessings, understanding the inner meaning of important spiritual subjects and miraculous events, or reflecting upon the Nocturnal Journey of God’s Messenger (uwbp), the night in which the eight heavens were decorated to receive and honor him when he was called upon to come before God Almighty. Visiting the grave of God’s Prophet Abraham, upon whom be peace, in a dreammeans obedience to one’s parents, being true to them, seeking their love, blessings and pleasure with sincerity and trueness with one’s words and actions. Visiting holy sites in a dream also means seeking knowledge and wisdom, having love for charitable people, associating with good people, seeking to learn one’s religion at the hand of a pious teacher, to receive blessings and benefits in this life and in the next.

(Also see Muhammad, upon whom be peace; Mecca; Medina)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

TURNING

Changing or developing. See left or right. Turning in a circle represents the lack of progress.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

APE

Can represent a world of experience human beings have lost and feel sorrow at its absence. In developing self con­sciousness, with its labyrinth of ideas and decisions, humans lost a sense of oneness with life around them. Animals have enormous remembered wisdom; remembered through instincts and complex social codes. This wisdom is still accessible to humans who can listen to the unconscious, and discover the enormous wealth of information they have about such things as social behaviour and body language.

The ape can depict this wisdom, especially if it is white haired. Or it might show the personal folly of trying to let instincts dominate us now we have self awareness. Idioms: he is just aping. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

ARCHETYPES

Although the word archetype has a long history, Carl Jung used it to express something he observed in human dreams. He said the archetypes are a tendency or instinctive trend in the human unconscious to represent certain motifs or themes. As our instinctive urge to reproduce may show itself in consciousness as sexual fantasies, so archetypes show themselves as cenain dream, fantasy, or story themes. Just as each individual animal does not create its own instincts, we do not create our own collective thought pattern.

The influ­ence these archetypes have upon our conscious self is varied. Panly they are supportive, as instincts are to an animal.

Some ancient cultures erected a pantheon of gods and god­desses. Many of these gods were expressions of archetypal themes, such as death, rebirth and womanhood.

A sheepdog has in itself, unconsciously, a propensity to herd animals un­der direction. Through the worship of gods, perhaps ancient people touched similar reservoirs of strength and healing. Without such, the individual might find it mcre difficult to face the fact that death waits at the end of their life, or to allow sexuality to emerge into their life at pube ty.

The dream of a girl suffering from anorexia shows her cutting off her own breasts with scissors. Here her developing sexual traits and urges are unacceptable to her. Perhaps she ‘cuts them off’ by not eating, thus preventing her body and psyche from matur­ing. In the past it would have been recommended that she give offerings to a goddess, thus aligning her with an uncon­scious power to adapt and mature.

Some of these archetypal patterns of behaviour, such as territorialism and group identity, are only too obviously be­hind much that occurs in war, and their influence needs to be brought more fully into awareness. But we must be careful in accepting Jung s descnption of the archetypes. In more recent years, through the tremendously amplified access to the un­conscious made possible in psychiatry through such drugs as LSD, a lot more information about unconscious imagery has been made available.

It is possible thai certain synthesising aspects of the mind produce images to represent huge areas of collected experience, i.e. the Mystic Mother or Madonna rep­resenting our collected experience of our mother.

Whatever may be the explanation of these archetypal themes, they are imponant because they illustrate how we as individuals, and as human beings collectively, have been able to develop^ur sense of conscious identity amidst enormous forces of unconsciousness, collectivity and external stresses. Below are some common archetypal symbols and their associ­ated images. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

BOY

If known: what you feel about that boy, but referring to oneself, i.e. one might think the child cautious and anxious, so it depicts one’s own childhood feelings of caution and anxiety. Male dream: oneself at that age; the difficulties faced, habits acquired, attitudes imprinted on one by experiences at that age. Circumstances may not have permitted parts of us to mature, as when a child loses its mother, so does not develop a relationship with a woman. So could be pan we need to ‘father’ towards maturity. Also the eternal potential for growth, openness to the new and enthusiasm about tomor­row.

If older than yourself: your potential, or how you feel about maturing. Female dream: your own developing ability to express in outer action. Feelings about a son. See son under family. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

CAPTIVE, PRISONER

Many emotions, anxieties, moods or ideas captivate’ us, or act as means of denying free expression to our own talents, sexuality or well being. Fear of illness might stop us going on holiday, thoughts that only the pnvileged can make it in business might stop us developing ideas we have. In this sense we, or areas of our potential, can be imprisoned or made captive. Using dream processing and the allied methods can help to define what is restraining us and find freedom from such restraints. See imprisoned; wolf under ani­mals; cage, cell; escape; holding; trapped. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DANCING

Example: ‘We were both shy of each other but as the dance went on I found I could move so well to his steps that we felt like one, it was so effortless that it felt like floating’ (Heather).

The example shows the general meaning of danc­ing, feeling at one with someone or aspects of yourself. It shows unity, as seen in the cells working as a harmonious whole. It can also mean happiness; sexual mating dance; get­ting closer or more intimate.

If the dance is awkward: lack of harmony connected with what is depicted. Animals dancing: harmony with unconscious drives and sexuality. Skeletons or dark ‘things’ dancing: developing a relationship with what we fear—meeting it; dancing with death. In life we always dance with death, meaning we have an intimate relationship with it, but might not be ready to recognise who our panner is. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DREAM ANALYSIS

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream.

It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult.

It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible.

It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward.

It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents.

It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DREAMER

Our current ‘self image’ is displayed by what we do in our dreams.

If we are the active and central character in our dreams, then we have a positive, confident image of our­self.

The role we place ourself in is also the one we feel at home with, or one which is habitual to us.

If we are con­stantly a victim in our dreams, we need to consider whether we are living such a role in everyday life. Dreams may help us look at our self image from a more detached viewpoint. We can look back on what we do in a dream more easily than we can on our everyday waking behaviour. This helps us under­stand our attitudes or stance, a very growth-promoting experi­ence.

It is important to understand the viewpoint of the other dream characters also; although they depict secondary views, they enlarge us through acquaintance. See identity and dreams.

What we ourself are doing in our dreams is an expression of how we see ourselves at the time of the dream, our stance or attitude to life, or what could be generalised as our self image. It typifies what aspects of our nature we identify with most strongly.

Example: My husband and I are at some sort of social club.

The people there are ex-workmates of mine and I am having a wonderful time and am very popular. My husband is enjoying my enjoyment’ (quoted from article by the author in She magazine).

The dreamer describes herself as ‘a mature 41- year old’.

The dream, and her description of it, sum up her image of herself in just a few words. She sees herself as attrac­tive, sociable, liked, happily married. She is probably good looking and healthy. But the dream carries on. She and her husband ‘are travelling down a country lane in an open horse drawn carriage.

It is very dark and is in the areas we used to live. We come to a hump-backed bridge, and as we amve at the brow of the bridge a voice says, “Fair lady, come to me.” My body is suddenly lying flat and starts to rise. I float and everything is black, warm and peaceful. Then great fear comes over me and I cry out my husband’s name over and over. I get colder and slip in and out of the blackness. I wake. Even with the light on I feel the presence of great evil. From a very positive sense of self, she has moved to a feeling which horri­fies her. How can such a confident, socially capable woman, one who has succeeded professionally as well as in her mar­riage, have such feelings? The answer probably lies in the statement of her age. At 41 she is facing the menopause and great physical change.

The image of herself she has lived with depended, or developed out of, having a firm sexually attrac­tive body, and being capable of having children. Losing what­ever it is that makes one sexually desirable must change the image others have of one, and that one has of oneself.

The hump of the bridge represents this peak of her life, from whence she will start to go downhill towards death, certainly towards retirement. So she is facing midlife crisis in which a new image of herself will need to be forged.

To define what self image is portrayed in your dreams, consider just what situation you have created for yourself in the dream, and what environment and people you are with. Example: I am a shy 16 year old and am worried about my dream. In it I am walking along the school’s main corridor. I try to cover myself with my hands as a few pei pie go by, not noticing me. Then a group of boys pass, pointing and laugh­ing at me—one boy I used to fancy.

A teacher then gives me clothes. They are too big but I wear them because I have nothing else’ (HM). Adolescence is a time of great change anyway, when a lot is developing as far as self image is con­cerned. Her nakedness shows how vulnerable she feels, and how she has a fear that other people must be able to see her developing sexuality and womanhood.

It is new to her and still embarrassing, particularly with boys she feels something for. She tries to cover up her feelings, and uses attitudes she has learnt from parents and teachers, but these are not suit­able. So we might summarise by saying that the situation she places herself in within the dream shows her present uncer­tainty and sense of needing clothes—attitudes or confidence —of her own. See identity in dreams; individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

HERO / INE

The archetype of the hero has fascinated, taught, even ennobled human beings for thousands of years. Appears as Christ, Athena, Krishna, Mohammed, Mary, Ulysses, Su­perman, Florence Nightingale, a great game hunter, Hercules, or any film or TV hero such as Captain Kirk or Dr Who. We are the hero/ine of our own life. We brave great dangers, face monsters, pass through difficult initiations. Fundamental to the whole drama of the hero/ine is the evolution of our own identity from the depths of unconscious in the physical pro­cess of conception, through to developing self awareness as an adult.

It is such an incredible journey, so heroic, so impossi­ble of achievement, so fraught with dangers and triumphs, that it is the greatest story in the world.

We find it told over and over symbolically in all the ‘holy’ books as the binh of the holy child; the journey of the hero/ ine; the creation of the world—our consciousness, the jour­neys of Moses. All penain to the difficulties and means we use to be; to the an of keeping balance amidst the multitude of forces acting on our human psyche.

The hero/ine is the one who dares, even though they feel afraid and in pain.

The avoidance of fear and pain in our society, where chemical anodynes or tranquillisers are sought to remove any tiny dis­comfort, is a great tragedy. Not that we need to become mas- ochists, but we miss our own wholeness through fear of our own power of experiencing. In other cultures the ability to meet pain and fear were considered spiritual strengths. They still are.

The following example shows one dreamer meeting his own fear and uncertainty. Example: 4I was in an ancient room. It had the feeling of being an old church. Then my wife and I were in bed in the room.

A middle aged woman was in the room. She was a ghost. I felt afraid of her, but to meet the fear I tried to confront her. I reached out my hand to her. I was crying out in my sleep from fear. As she took my hand I was amazed and shocked to feel it was physically real’ (see Christ within this entry, above). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

LUCIDITY, AWAKE IN SLEEP

Sometimes in the practice of deep relaxation, meditation or sensory deprivation, our being enters into a state akin to sleep, yet we maintain a personal waking awareness. This is like a journey into a deep interior world of mind and body where our senses no longer function in their waking manner, where the brain works in a different way, and where awareness is introverted in a degree we do not usually experience. It can be a frightening world, simply because we are not accustomed to it. In a similar way a measure of waking awareness can arise while dreaming. This is called lucid dreaming. During it we can change or wilfully direct what is happening in the dream in a way not usual to the dream state.

Example: 4I had backed my car into a big yard, a commer­cial area. My wife, two of my sons and I got out of the car. As we stood in the yard talking I realised there was a motorbike where my car should be. I said to everyone, “There was a car here a moment ago, now it’s a motorbike. Do you know what that means? It means we are dreaming.” Mark my son was now with us, and my ex-wife. I asked them if they realised they were dreaming. They got very vague and didn’t reply. I asked them again and felt very clearly awake’ (William V). William’s is a fairly typical lucid dream, but there are features which it does not illustrate. During the days or weeks prior to a lucid dream, many people experience an increase in flying dreams.

The next example shows another common feature.

Example: In many of my dreams I become aware that I am dreaming. Also, if anything unpleasant threatens me in the dream I get away from it by waking myself (Alan). Lucidity often has this feature of enabling the dreamer to avoid un­pleasant elements of the dream.

The decision to avoid any unpleasant internal emotions is a common feature of a per­son’s conscious life, so this aspect of lucidity is simply a way of taking such a decision into the dream. Some writers even suggest it as a way of dealing with frightening dreams. Avoid­ance does not solve the problem, it simply pushes the emo­tion deeper into the unconscious where it can do damage more surreptitiously. Recent findings regarding suppressed gnef and stress, which connects them with a higher incidence of cancer, suggests that suppression is not a healthy way of dealing with feelings.

Another approach to lucidity is that it can be a son of playground where one can walk through walls, jump from high buildings and fly, change the sofa into an attractive lover, and so on. True, the realisation that our dream life is a differ­ent world and that it does have completely different principles at work than our waking world is imponant. Often people introven into their dream life the morals and fears which are only relevant to being awake in physical life.

To avoid a charging bull is cenainly imponant in waking life. In our dream life, though, to meet its charge is to integrate the enor­mous energy which the bull represents, an energy which is our own but which we may have been avoiding or running away’ from previously. Realising such simple differences revolutionises the way we relate to our own internal events and possibilities.

To treat lucid dreams as if they offered no other attainable expenence than to manipulate the dream en­vironment, or avoid an encounter, is to miss an amazing fea­ture of human potential.

Example: ‘In my dream I was watching a fern grow. It was small but opened out very rapidly. As I watched I became aware that the fern was simply an image representing a pro­cess occurring within myself which I grew increasingly aware of as I watched. Then I was fully awake in my dream and realised that my dream, perhaps any dream, was an expres­sion of actual and real events occurring in my body and mind. I felt enormous excitement, as if I were witnessing something of great importance’ (Francis P).

It is now acceptable, through the work of Freud, Jung and many others, to consider that within images of the dream lie valuable information about what is occurring within the dreamer, perhaps unconsciously. Strangely, though, it is almost never considered that one can have direct perception into this level of internal ‘events’ with­out the dream. What Francis describes is an experience of being on the cusp of symbols and direct perception. Consider­ing the enormous advantage of such direct information gath­ering, it is surprising it is seldom mentioned except in the writings of Corriere and Han, The Dream Makers.

Example: After defining why I had not woken in sleep recently, i.e. loss of belief, I had the following experience. I awoke in my sleep and began to see, without any symbols, that my attitudes and sleep movements expressed a feeling of restrained antagonism or irritation to my wife. I could also observe the feelings were arising from my discipline of sexual­ity. Realising I did not want those feelings I altered them and woke enough to turn towards her’ (Francis P). After the first of his direct perception dreams, Francis attempted to use this function again, resulting in the above, and other, such dreams. Just as classic dream interpretation says that the dream symbols represent psychobiological logical processes which might be uncovered by dream processing, what we see in Francis’ lucidity is a direct route to self insight, and through it a rapid personal growth to improved life experience. Such dreams provide not only psychological insight, but very fre­quently a direct perception of processes occurring in the body, as the following example illustrates.

Example: ‘Although deeply asleep I was wide awake with­out any shape or form. I had direct experience, without any pictures, of the action of the energies in my body. I had no awareness of body shape, only of the flow of activities in the organs. I checked over what I could observe, and noticed a tension in my neck was interfering with the flow and ex­change of energies between the head and trunk. It was also obvious from what I could see that the tension was due to an attitude I had to authority, and if the tension remained it could lead to physical ill health’ (Tony C).

An effective way to develop lucidity is frequently to con­sider the events of waking life as if they were a dream. Try to see events as one might see dream symbols. What do they mean in terms of one’s motivations, fears, personal growth? What do they suggest about oneself? For instance a person who works in a photographic darkroom developing films and prints might see they were trying to bnng to consciousness the latent—unconscious—side of themselves.

A banker might feel they were working at how best to deal with their sexual and personal resources. In this way one might actually apply what is said in this dream dictionary to one’s outer circumstances.

The second instruction is, on waking, at a convenient mo­ment, imagine oneself standing within one’s recent dream. As you get a sense of this dream environment, realise that you are taking waking awareness into the dream. From the standpoint of being fully aware of the dream action and events, what will you now do in and with the dream? Re-dream it with con­sciousness.

For example the things you run from in your nor­mal dreaming you could now face. See dream processing for fun her suggestions. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

NIGHTMARES

Many dreams lead us to feel an intensity of emotion we may seldom if ever feel in waking life.

If the emotions felt are frightening or disgusting we call the dream a nightmare. One of the common features of a nightmare is that we are desperately trying to get away from the situation; feel stuck in a terrible condition; or on waking feel enormous relief that it was just a dream. Because of the intensity of a nightmare we remember it long after other dreams; even if we seldom ever recall other dreams, even worry about what it means.

As so many dreams have been investigated in depth, using such varied approaches as hypnosis, exploration of associa­tions and emotional content, and LSD psychotherapy, in which the person can explore usually unconscious memories, imagery and feelings, we can be certain we know what night­mares are. They arise from six main causes.

Unconscious memories of intense emotions, such as those arising in a child being left in a hospital without its mother. Example: see second example in dark.

Intense anxiety produced—but not fully released at the time—by external situations such as involvement in war scenes, sexual assault (this applies to males as well as females, as they are frequently assaulted). Example: ‘A THING is marauding around the rather bleak, dark house I am in with a small boy.

To avoid it I lock myself in a room with the boy.

The THING finds the room and tries to break the door down. I frantically try to hold it closed with my hands and one foot pressed against it, my back against a wall for leverage. It was a terrible struggle and I woke myself by screaming’ (Terry F). When Terry allowed the sense of fear to arise in him while awake, he felt as he did when a child—the boy in the dream—during the bombing of the Second World War. His sense of insecurity dating from that time had emerged when he left a secure job, and had arisen in the images of the nightmare. Un­derstanding his fears, he was able to avoid their usual paralysing influence.

Childhood fears, such as loss of parent, being lost or abandoned, fear of attack by stranger or parent, anxiety about own internal drives.

Many nightmares in adults have a similar source, namely fear connected with internal drives such as aggression, sexuality and the process of growth and change, such as encounter with adolescence, loss of sexual characteristics, old age and death. Example: see third example in doors under house, buildings.

Serious illness. Example: ‘I dream night after night that a cat is gnawing at my throat’ (male from Landscapes of the Night).

The dreamer had developing cancer of the throat. These physical illness dreams are not as common as the other classes of nightmare.

Precognition of fateful events. Example: My husband, a pilot in the RAF, had recently lost a friend in an air crash. He woke one morning very troubled—he is usually a very positive person. He told me he had dreamt his friend was flying a black jet, and wanted my husband to fly with him.

Although a simple dream, my husband could not shake off the dark feelings. Shortly afterwards his own jet went down and he was killed in the crash’ (Anon.).

Understanding the causes of nightmares enables us to deal with them.

The things we run from in the nightmare need to be met while we are awake. We can do this by sitting and imagining ourselves back in the dream and facing or meeting what we were frightened of. Terry imagined himself opening the door he was fighting to keep closed. In doing this and remaining quiet he could feel the childhood feelings arising. Once he recognised them for what they were, the terror went out of them.

A young woman told me she had experienced a recurring nightmare of a piece of cloth touching her face. She would scream and scream and wake her family. One night her brother sat with her and made her meet those feelings de­picted by the cloth. When she did so she realised it was her grandmother’s funeral shroud. She cried about the loss of her grandmother, felt her feelings about death, and was never troubled again by the nightmare.

The techniques given in dream processing will help in meeting such feelings. Even the simple act of imagining ourselves back in the nightmare and facing the frightening thing will begin the process of changing our relationship with our internal fears. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

PHOTOS

Memories; wanting to be remembered or noticed; looking at some aspect of oneself. Looking at family photos: realisation of past influences in one’s life; family environment, mentally and emotionally. Taking photos : capturing a realisa­tion; taking notice of something; remembering. Photo of one­self: one’s self image; need to look at oneself or get an objec­tive view. Photos which come to life: the living influence of past experience; our continuing involvement in what the pic­ture depicts; something which we held as a thought, which is taking shape and becoming real. Developing photos: bringing to consciousness what was latent or unrealised before. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

PREGNANCY

A new area of one’s potential or personality developing; a deepening relationship with one’s unconscious is producing a new area of experience—still unexpressed, but developing. In a woman’s dream: may refer to desire for a child.

If pregnant at the time of dream: anxieties, feelings or intu­ition regarding pregnancy and birth. Carolyn Winget and Fre­deric Kapp researched on the dreams of 70 pregnant women.

Those women whose dreams included a high percentage of anxiety themes were the ones who delivered their babies in the shortest time—less than ten hours.

The conclusion was that by allowing feelings of anxiety in our dreams we are less influenced by anxiety in waking, and we can deal with situa­tions more confidently.

Someone else pregnant in dream: an aspect of oneself about to bring forth new characteristics; an intuition about that person. See example under girl; cave; third example un­der penis in body; second example under baby. See also birth. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

REPTILES, LIZARDS, SNAKES

Our basic spinal and lower brain reactions, such as fight or flight, reproduction, attraction or repulsion, sex drive, need for food and reaction to pain. This includes the fundamental evolutionary ability to change and the urge to survive—very powerful and ancient processes. Our relationship with the reptile in our dreams depicts our relat- edness to such forces in us, and how we deal with the im­pulses from the ancient pan of our brain.

Modern humans face the difficulty of developing an inde­pendent identity and yet keeping a working relationship with the primitive, thus maturing/bringing the primitive into an efficiently functioning connection with the present social world.

The survival urge at base might be kill or run, but it can be transformed into the ambition which helps, say, an opera singer meet difficulties in her career. Also the very primitive has in itself the promise of the future, of new aspects of human consciousness. This is because many extraordinary human functions take place unconsciously, in the realm of the reptile/spine/lower brain/right brain/autonomic nervous sys­tem. Being unconscious they are less amenable to our waking will. They function fully only in some fight or flight, survive or die, situations.

If we begin to touch these with consciousness, as we do in dreams, new functions are added to conscious­ness. See The dream as extended perception under ESP and dreams.

frog

Unconscious life or growth processes which can lead to transformation (the frog/prince story); the growth from child­hood vulnerability—tadpole to frog—therefore the process of life in general and its wisdom. Frogspawn: sperm, ovum and reproduction.

lizard

Example: ‘My wife and I saw a large lizard on the wall near a banana. It was there to catch the flies.

The lizard turned so it was facing away from us—head up the wall. We then were able to see it had large wing-like flaps which spread from its head in an invened V. With amazement we saw on these flaps wonderful pictures, in full colour, of birds. In fleet­ing thoughts I wondered if the bird “paintings” were to attract birds, or were some form of camouflage. But I felt cenain the lizard had “painted” these wonderful pictures with its uncon­scious an’ (David T). Generally, a lizard is very much the same as a snake, except it lacks the poisonous aspect; aware­ness of unconscious or instinctive drives, functions and pro­cesses. In the above dream, the banana is both David’s plea­sure and sexuality, while the lizard is the creativity emerging from his unconscious through the attention he is giving it—he is looking at the lizard. Chameleon: either one’s desire to fade into the background, or adaptability.

snake

Example: A small snake about a foot long had dropped down my shirt neck. I could feel it on the left side of my neck Fearing it was poisonous and might bite me, I moved very slowly. At one point I put my head on the ground, hoping the snake would wish to crawl away. It did not. Then I was near an elephant I loved, and hoped it would remove the snake. It did not. Even as I slept I felt the snake was an expression of the attitude of not shanng myself with anybody except family’ (David T).

For months prior to the above dream David had experienced a great deal of neck pain. After dis­cussing the dream with his wife, and realising much of his thinking and feeling was intumed, the pain disappeared. So the snake was both poisoner’ and ‘healer’. This may be why snakes are used as a symbol of the medical profession.

The Hebrew word for the serpent in the Garden of Eden is Nahash, which can be translated as blind impulsive urges, such as our instinctive drives.

So, generally, snakes depict many different things, but usu­ally the life process.

If we think of a person’s life from con­ception to death, we see a flowing moving event, similar in many ways to the speeded up films of a seed growing into a plant, flowering and dying.

The snake depicts the force or energy behind that movement and purposiveness—the force of life which leads us both to growth and death. That energy —like electricity in a house, which can be heat, power, sound and vision—lies behind all our functions. So in some dreams the snake expresses our sexuality, in others the rising of that energy up our body to express itself as digestion—the intesti­nal snake; as the healing or poisonous energy of our emotions and thoughts.

Example: ‘I was in a huge cathedral, the mother church. I wanted to go to the toilet/gents. As I held my penis to urinate it became a snake and reached down to the urinal to drink. It was thirsty. I struggled with it, pulling it away from the un­clean liquid. Still holding it I walked to a basin and gave it pure water to drink’ (Bill A). Here the connection between snake and sexuality is obvious. But the snake is not just Bill’s penis.

It is the direction his sexual urges take him he is strug­gling with. Out of his sense of love and connection with life— the cathedral—he wants to lift his drive towards something which will not leave him with a sense of uncleanness. Snake in connection with any hole: sexual relatedness.

A snake biting us: unconscious worries about our health, frustrated sexual impulse, our emotions turned against our­selves as internalised aggression, can poison us and cause very real illness, so may be shown as the biting snake. Snake biting others: biting remarks, a poisonous tongue.

A crowned or light-encircled snake: when our ‘blind impulses’ or instinctive or unconscious urges and functions are in some measure inte­grated with our conscious will and insight, this is seen as the crowned snake or even winged snake. It shows real self awareness and maturity. In coils of snake: feeling bound in the ‘blind impulses’ or habitual drives and feeling responses. Instincts and habits can be redirected, as illustrated by Hercu­les’ labours. Snake with tail in mouth: sense of the circle of life—binh, growth, reproduction, aging, death, rebirth; the eternal. Snake coiling up tree, pole, cross: the blind instinctive forces of life emerging into conscious experience—in other words the essence of human expenence with its involvement in pain, pleasure, time and eternity; the process of personal growth or evolution; healing because personal growth often moves us beyond old attitudes or situations which led to inner tension or even sickness. Snake in grass: sense or intuition of talk behind your back; danger, sneakiness. Colours: green, our internal life process directed, perhaps through satisfied feelings, love and creativity, into a healing process or one which leads to our personal growth and positive change; white, eternal aspect of our life process, or becoming con­scious of it; blue, religious feelings or coldness in relations. See colours; anxiety dreams; death and rebirth, the self under archetypes; dreams and Ancient Greece; cellar under house, buildings; hypnosis and dreams; jungle; paralysis. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

SCISSORS

Cutting remarks; cynicism, sharp tongue; anger, fear of or feelings about castration (female castration ex­presses in cutting off breasts)—the cutting off of developing sexual characteristics in body and mind; sometimes refers to separation or independence, as in cutting umbilical cord, or death; cutting something or someone out of one’s life; cutting off or cutting out feelings. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

TAME

Developing a relationship with the animal aspect of self; taking away sexual drive. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

TRANSFORMATION

Any dream in which an obvious change occurs in one of the dream figures shows transformation. Each of us go through major transformations during growth— not just physically, as when we change from a toothless baby to a walking, toothy child, but also psychologically.

Example: ‘On a hot summer day I was walking with a beautiful black woman through countryside. She stopped and told me she had a problem.

To show me she pulled down the strap of her dress. On her shoulder the black skin was peeling to reveal golden white skin underneath. She said that if she kept seeing me she would become completely white. She was going to ask advice from her mother about what to do. As we walked on two black men fought with me. They wanted to take her back to the village. I woke feeling I was winning’ (paraphrased from The Way of The Dream, Fraser Boa). Here the dreamer is relating well to his own feelings of sexuality and sensuality. However, he is beginning to see a female part­ner as a real person, not just as his sexuality paints her. Also, the reference to seeking advice from the mother suggests his ability to love is still not freed from emotional and erotic connections with his mother, and needs transforming. One often hears people, even in their 40s, saying It is difficult (developing a relationship) with that person because my mother doesn’t like them.’ The dreamer ‘fights’ the opposing drives, which want to take the man’s love back to the village, his childhood level of love—thus he moves towards becoming independent in love and life.

The transformation is towards mature love and relatedness.

For a further description of the major areas and themes of transformation, see individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

WALL

Codes of behaviour, belief systems, attitudes—often un­conscious—you live within, or are protected by; the bound­aries of behaviour or thought you keep within, are fearful of extending beyond, or are trapped by, thereby what one feels to be barriers or restrictions, one’s feelings of confidence which protect against anxiety or social knocks’; the feelings or attitudes you keep people away with—the walls we put up between us to maintain privacy, stop being hun, or to main­tain a role or status. Also a special feeling which you have created, such as developing a sense of one’s own value.

Example: I realised T had been in Bill’s room and not respected his need for privacy, so Bill had tom down the wall as a protest and made the room, which now appeared about four times its usual size, into a public sitting room’ (Cyril A). Sometimes what the wall depicts is obvious, as in the exam­ple, where it is shown as the way Cyril maintains his separa­tion from others and thus is a private individual.

The fall of the wall shows how exposed’ one might be.

The description of private areas of our life in a newspaper might be an exam­ple of just such a wall coming down. Idioms: drive up the wall; go to the wall; writing on the wall; back to the wall; knock one’s head against a wall. See wall, fence. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

ADMINISTRATOR / PUBLIC SERVANT

Often appears in a dream when you are suffering from lack of self-worth. Also addressed here is the dreamer’s “responsibility to govern,” which means facing the problems and developing the capabilities to manage his own issues. In that sense, it addresses self-determination. Such concerns are surely influenced by the dreamer’s attitude toward power and acceptance. Freud is said to have dreamed as a young man that he was a public servant, which might help explain his ambitions.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

DEPTHS

Walking into and through the depths is part of growing and developing. Confrontation with one’s unconscious.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

TRAIN

See Railroad Station. Vacation or business trip? Fear of “missing” the train; or it is high time (if you want to catch the train). See Haste. Developing ones personality, striving for success and being sociable. Fleeing from the present situation.

Are you observing the train or are you traveling on the train (you are either wanting to move or you are part of the movement). What is happening on the train and how would you characterize the action?

According to Freud, leaving on a train and traveling on a train means death. However, Freud suffered from a phobia about trains.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

VOLCANO

Drives repressed and drives released, stress or stress reduction. This implies a “test by fire.” What is innermost comes to the surface. It might express a fantasy of merging in a relationship, or fusion of different parts of the Self in a developing personality. Also, what was hard is made to flow again.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

WEALTH

The expression of a desire for a full and spirited inner life. In dreams, wealth and money always are connected with psychic energies. This is a warning not to be too modest, or to allow yourself to have false expectations. Your existence and your personal qualities are your greatest wealth. How you are dealing with the world—protecting what is uniquely yours and developing it—makes a decided difference. See Price, Treasure.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

ARENA

1- Dreaming of being in an arena either as a player or as a spectator highlights the fact that we may need to make the decision to move into a specifically created environment, one which gives more room for self-expression and creativity or theatricality.

2- We are developing a new focus of attention, or an area of conflict. This conflict may need to be brought out into the open, into open forum.

3- Today sport is often used as an energy release. Spiritually, an arena suggests a ritualised conflict.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

CRUTCH

1- When we dream of crutches we are experiencing the need for support, although it may also be that we need to support others. We may find others inadequate and need to readjust our thinking.

2- We may disapprove of other people’s shortcomings or weakness.

3- In developing spiritually we become aware of our various dependencies, whether these are alcohol, drugs, patterns of behaviour or people.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

FAMILY

1- “flic family is the first basic security image that a child has. Often, through circumstances not within that child’s control, that image becomes distorted, and dreams will either attempt to put this image right or will confirm the distortion. Thus we may dream of an argument with a family member, but the interpretation will depend on both the circumstances of the dream and our everyday relationship with that person. All future relationships are influenced by the ones we first develop within the family.

Psychologically the struggle for individuality should take place within the safety of the family unit. This, however, docs not always happen. In dreams we are able to ‘manipulate’ the images of our family members, so that we can work through our difficulties without harming anyone else (It is interesting to note that one person working on his own dreams can have a profound noticeable cffcct on the interactions and unconscious bondings between other members of his family). Almost all of the problems we encounter in life are reflected within the family, so in times of sUess we will dream of previous problems and difficulties that the family has experienced.

The Spiritual Triangle.

A group in which we feel safe.

Since relationships in the family- are so important, dreams containing family members can have extra significance. Some typical dreams are:

A man’s mother being transformed into another woman

A man’s first closc relationship with a woman is with his mother. Depending on the circumstances of the dream, such a transformation can be either positive or negative. It can be a sign of growth for him to realise, through dream, that he can let mother go. This transformation indicates some change in his perception of women (sec Airima).

A woman’s father, brother or lover turning into someone else Similarly, a woman’s first relationship with the male is usually with her father. She must learn to walk away from that relationship in order to progress onto fuller relationships. When she can handle her Animus (See Introduction), she is ready for that transformation.

A man’s brother or a woman’s sister appearing in a dream often represents the Shadow (See Introduction). Often it is easier to project the negative side of our personalities onto members of the family.

If this projection is allowed to continue, it can cause difficulty with family relationships in later life. Often the solution will present itself in dreams to enable us to come to terms with our own projections. “fhe pattern of aggressions between familv members is fairly typical, but oddly is often easier to work through in dreams than in everyday life.

Dreams about the family figure so prominently because most of the conflicts and problems in life are experienced first within that environment.

It is as though a pattern is laid down which, until it is broken willingly, will continue to appear.

Confusion of family members e.g. mother’s face on father’s body suggests that we may be having problems in deciding which parent is most important to us. Family members suffering from injury or trauma or appearing to be distorted in some way may reflect the dreamer’s fear for, or about, that person.

A family member continually appearing in dreams or, conversely, not appearing when expected The relationship with that person (or the dreamer’s concept of that person) needs to be better understood.

Dreaming of an incestuous relationship may indicate that the dreamer has become obsessed in some way with the other person.

The dream has occurred in order to highlight either the importance or the potential danger - of such a relationship.

Dreamer’s parents crushing the dreamer and thus forcing rebellion. This suggests that the dreamer needs to break away from learnt childhood behaviour and develop as an individual.

Dreaming of a parent’s death can also have the same significance. When a parent appears in our own environment, we will have learnt to change roles within the parent/child relationship and perhaps will accept our parents as friends. Parents behaving inappropriately can indicate our need to recognise that they are only human, and not as perfcct as we had first perceived.

Dreaming of rivalry with one parent When a child is first born, it moves through extreme self- involvement to an exclusive relationship, usually with mother. Onlv later docs he or she becomc aware of the need for a different relationship with a third person. Often this relationship causes the child to question his or her own validity as a person. When this question is not resolved successfully it may persist in the dream image of conflict with a parent.

Dreaming of conflict between a loved one and a member of one’s family The dreamer has not fully differentiated between his needs and desire for each person. Learning how to love outside the family is a sign of maturity.

The figure of a family member intruding in dreams suggests that family loyalties can get in the way within the dreamer’s everyday life. Rivalry between siblings in dreams usually harks back to a feeling of insecurity and doubt, possibly as to whether we are loved enough within the family framework.

Individual members and then- position within the family can symbolise the various archetypes. Thus, father can represent the masculine principle and authority; whereas mother represents the nurturing, protective principle. Brother As already stated, a brother can represent both feelings of kinship and of rivalry. In a man’s dream an older brother can represent experience and authority, while a younger brother suggests vulnerability and possibly lack of maturity. In a woman’s dream, a younger brother can represent a sense of rivalry, but also of vulnerability; whether her own or her brother’s.

An older brother can signify her extrovert self.

Daughter When the relationship with a daughter is highlighted in dreams, it often represents the outcome of the relationship between husband and wife. In a woman’s dream, the relationship with the daughter usually suggests a mutually supportive one although rivalry and jealousy can arise and needs to be dealt with. Sometimes this can safely be done in dreams. In a man’s dream his daughter may represent his fears and doubts about his own ability to handle his vulnerability.

Extended family (such as cousins, aunts, uncles)

Members of the extended family usually appear in dreams either as themselves, or as typifying various parts of ourselves which arc recognisible.

Father If the relationship with father has been successful in waking life, the image of father in dreams will be a positive one. Father represents authority and the conventional forms of law and order. In a man’s life father becomes a role model, whether appropriate or not.

It is often only when the individual realises that he is not being true to his own nature that dreams can point the way to a more successful life. In a woman’s life, father is the ‘pattern’ on whom she bases all later relationships. When she appreciates that she longer need use this pattern. she is often able to work out in dreams a more appropriate way to have a mature relationship.

If the relationship with father has been a difficult or negative one, there mav be some resistance to resolving the various conflicts which will have arisen. Often this can be accomplished in dreams. Grandparents Grandparents appearing in dreams can highlight our attitude to them, but also to the traditions and beliefs handed down by them. It could be said that grandparents do not know whether they have clone a good job of raising their children until their sins and daughters have children of their own.

Husband/Live in partner

Crucial within the husband/wife relationship are the wife’s feelings about her own sexuality and intimacy of body, mind and spirit. Her view of herself will have been formed by her connection with her father, and any subsequent partnering will be coloured by that attachment.

If her doubts and fears about validity are not properly expressed, they will surface in dreams about the loss, or death, of her husband. They may also be projected onto other women’s husbands.

Mother A child’s relationship with mother is pivotal in its development. Largely it is the first relationship which the child develops, and should be perceived by the child as a nurturing, caring one.

If this does not happen, fears and doubts may arise. In a man’s life this may result in continually developing dependent relationships with older women, or denying his right to a relationship completely. In a woman’s life, her relationship with her mother will colour all other relationships. She may find herself pushed into nurturing the needy male, or in forming relationships with both men and women which do not satisfv her basic needs. There arc many ways through dreams of working through relationships with mother, and much can be gained by daring to take this step. Provided one has come to terms with this relationship, much material and spiritual success can be achieved.

Sister The sister in dreams usually represents the feeling side of ourselves. VVe have the ability to make links with that side of ourselves through being able to understand our sister’s personality. In a man’s dream if she is older, the sister can represent the potential for persecution, but also of caring.

If she is younger then she can epitomise the more vulnerable side of him. In a woman’s dream if the sister is younger, she can represent rivalry.

If older she stands for capability. Son The son in dreams can signify the dreamer’s need for self- expression and for extroversion. He can also signify parental responsibility. In a mother’s dream he may represent one’s ambitions, hope and potential. In a father’s dream he can highlight unfulfilled hopes and dreams. Wife/Live in partner The wife/husband relationship is based on how the man perceives himself to be.

If he has previously formed a good, if not successful relationship with his mother, he will attempt to prove himself a good husband through his dreams. He will experience potential loss and death of his partner in the same way as he experienced the ‘loss’ of his mother.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

LILY

Because of their connection with funerals, for some people lilies can symbolise death. They can, however, also symbolise nobility and grace, and the interpretation needs to be carefully thought out.

If we are planting lilies we arc hoping for a peaceful transition in some area within our lives.

If we are gathering lilies, particularly in a woman’s dream we are developing a peaceful existence.

One symbol of lilies is that of purity and, particularly in a teenager’s dream, lilies can suggest virginity. Lilies in dreams, other than the white funerary arum lilv, can suggest aspects of femininity.

Spiritually lilies are a symbol of resurrection and of everlasting life. They arc often used in religious ceremony to denote this.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

PATH

1- A patli in a dream signifies the direction one has decided to take in life.

The type of path, e.g. whether it is smooth or rocky, winding or straight, may be just as important as the path itself.

2- Often a path can represent the way we feel a relationship or situation is developing. It can also suggest a way of following up a concept or line of enquiry. In waking life, it is often the way a clairvoyant ‘sees’ the way in which the enquirer’s life is changing.

3- A path in a dream can indicate a Spiritual direction.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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