Dreams Of Having A Babyshower | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Babyshower



10 COMMON DREAMS

DreamPedia

TEETH

My most popular requests for dream interpretation are by far, dreams about teeth falling out. Apparently this is quite disturbing to people who have this dream...they simply MUST know what it means! In my experience, a dream about one’s teeth falling out usually symbolizes that the dreamer is having a challenge getting their voice heard, or feelings acknowledged. This may be referring to their conversations with a particular person such as their significant other, boss or friend; or can be generalized for people who are shy; to include almost everyone they come in contact with. The dreamer needs to brush up on conversational skills, believe in the value of their own opinion, learn how to be less intimidated by aggressive people, and become more assertive in making their voice heard. Once they do that, this dream (which is a common recurring dream) should evolve, show improvement or disappear altogether.


PEOPLE

Every person that appears in a dream is supposed to represent an aspect of One’s Self, and not actually be about that other person at all. Rather, it is a quality or characteristic about that person that your dream is focusing on, and how it applies to YOU.

Try to think about what aspect(s) this could be. It can be something you admire and wish to follow or incorporate into your own personality. It could be a more negative characteristic that you may dislike intensely in your waking life, but which is telling you something about yourself and your beliefs, judgments or attitude. It could be a call to alter your thinking in some manner, in order to be more open-minded and accepting of this aspect in others and your own personality, because it is hampering your spiritual growth & making life harder for yourself. The other person in your dream is always mirroring something back to you about YOURSELF.

Try to discover what that something is, and go from there. Once you get it through your head that the other person’s appearance in your dream is NOT about them, but really about YOU, then you will be much more successful interpreting your own dreams. This takes constant reinforcing - I still find myself wanting to think it’s about that other person instead of me.

FLYING

usually represents freedom from the physical body, as we experience in sleep & while dreaming where we don’t use our physical bodies but instead use our mental & spiritual bodies to experience our dreams. Everybody seems to have a natural inclination to want to fly, unless that is changed by a fear of flying due to a frightening incident in his or her waking lives. Flying = freedom. This could mean a desire for freedom, an “escape” from restraints in your physical life (like a mini-vacation for the mind) or any number of possibilities. Tie it in with the context of your dream...what were you doing in your dream besides flying? How did it make you feel? Also, the type of flying I’m referring to here is the person flying on their own without an airplane or any aircraft at all. Airplanes & other aircraft are different symbols dealing with spiritual awareness, among other things.


SCHOOL

This type of dream relates to your current “lesson in life,” and if you learn how to interpret it, you’ll find out how you are progressing...yes, folks, you’re still taking tests and getting graded! Our “true selves” are our souls, and not our physical bodies. You are a spirit / soul having a physical dream, not the other way around. Ever feel like your life is like a play, and you are acting out some role that you don’t even understand, even surprising yourself with your actions sometimes? Bingo! When we sleep, that proverbial “Veil of Forgetfulness” that prevents us from “cheating on the test” is lifted, and we are shown what type of progress we are making (or, GULP, not making) and given guidance on what to do next. We always have free will in our waking physical lives, though.

If we stubbornly refuse to finish our tests, then we have that right - but we are doomed to repeat it until we pass it. And each time we turn away from the test, the next time it will be more unpleasant until finally we are forced to acknowledge it’s importance for our growth. The things we consider vitally important in our waking physical lives are not nearly as important as the TRUE reason we are here, which is to overcome our shortcomings so that we may get closer to our Source / God / Higher Power. To avoid learning the lesson is like forcing your soul to a fate similar to the mythical Greek god named Sisyphus who was doomed to keep rolling a boulder uphill for eternity, only to watch it roll back down & have to repeat the same tedious hard chore again & again. That sounds like school to me! So pay attention to the messages in dreams about schools, and you may advance faster. Do you really want to repeat kindergarten again?


CAR or VEHICLE

This is supposed to symbolize you in your waking life, in your physical body. Your physical body is used by the soul pretty much like we use a car...it’s driven for awhile and we give it gas / nourishment & repairs as needed until it stops running, and then we go back home. Pay attention to your car, which symbolizes your physical body. Are you behind the wheel, or is someone else in control? You want to be in charge of your life, naturally. What is the color & condition of this vehicle? Do you seem to be driving it the right way, on a safe road in good condition, or is the road rocky, winding, or suddenly ends at a cliff? That would signal that you need redirection. The bigger the vehicle, the more energy you may be successfully using for your daily lessons, depending on the context of your dream. Note all clues as to how you are faring, and make adjustments accordingly.


HOUSE

You drive a car, but typically you LIVE in a house/apartment. Dreams about a house symbolize a larger aspect of your Self, and the aspects of self, which make us whole. Each room is said to symbolize a different aspect of your Self, for example:

An Attic symbolizes your Higher Self, and your spiritual development & progress. Look at other symbols in the attic of your dream, and try to evaluate what they mean. Also pay attention to the feeling(s) you experience in your dream...is it serious, enlightening or what, exactly? All these things are clues for you.

A Bathroom would symbolize the need for cleansing / purging / elimination of something in your life that isn’t quite working, or that has served it’s purpose and now it’s time to move on.


A Kitchen would symbolize the need or act of supplying nourishment or food for the body / mind / soul...whatever is currently “cooking” or developing in your life.

If the food is plentiful, you have what you need.

If the cupboard is bare, time to go shopping for new nourishment, and you need to figure out what is needed for that “shopping list.”

A Dining Room is similar to the kitchen, but has more to do with immediate needs for supplying & utilizing nourishment, and less with the preparation or taking stock of those needs.

The Main Room or Living Room symbolizes your daily interactions with others, and often you will have other people appearing in your dreams in this room. Remember, they represent aspects of YOUR Self, and not themselves.

(See PEOPLE, above)

Bedrooms symbolize the unconscious mind aspect of your self, rest, dreams, sometimes and sexuality issues in your life.

The Upstairs symbolizes your spiritual awareness aspect of self, or the Higher Self that holds all the keys or knowledge to this life’s role you are acting out, and always has your higher good looked after, no matter how it might seem otherwise.

The Downstairs / Basement symbolizes your subconscious mind / aspect of self, which deals with habits, old coping skills, self-regulation, ego.

That’s usually the part of our Selves that makes us feel “torn” between knowing we should do one thing, and inexplicably ending up doing the opposite.

(Don’t you HATE that?)

Old belief patterns & fears have to be corrected, if that is the case. Tackle & overcome it, and you will feel much more peaceful about your life.

The Ground Floor of a house represents your daily agenda; what’s currently going on in your life.

Revisiting Old Houses from Childhood or Earlier Times: this points to issues that probably are resurfacing in your current life, and need to be looked at, analyzed, and healed so you can move forward and not backward.

If you find yourself repeating the same old tired mistakes, or dealing with the same old tired fears, chances are you will have this dream.

A Hallway symbolizes that you have reached an area that is necessary to journey through in order to get to the other side, and it may be a narrow path that has to be traversed with care and awareness.

If you have that “closed in, claustrophobic feeling” then you need to expand your awareness/open your mind to more possibilities for completing this phase of your journey.

TORNADO

This symbol points to emotional turmoil, as in a “whirlwind of emotions”; and / or rapid or sudden changes in your life.

It is a sign to “get a grip” on what is possibly spinning out of control & deal more effectively with your emotions. Meditation and finding some private “thinking time” for yourself might be a good idea.


COLORS

Pink: the color of love in all its forms. Often used to show healing through love.

Red: passion or anger.

Black: the unconscious mind; void; death of the old.

Grey: fear or confusion. White: truth, “coming clean,” purity; can also be symbolic of death & new beginnings.

Green: healing, growth, newness.

Blue: spirituality; could be a metaphor for “being blue” (look at context of dream).

Yellow: peacefulness, hope (as in “sunny disposition”); could be a cowardice metaphor.


NUMBERS

I am not a numerologist, but I will put a few basic numbers here

One: unity, completeness.

Two: balance of yin-yang principles, or male / female energies-either it’s needed or it’s achieved.

Three: (common dream symbol) the trinity of the Father, Son & Holy Spirit, and the 3 principles uniting in harmony, as in body-mind-spirit harmony. This dream has an important spiritual message for you - pay attention!

Five: changes!


BABY or PREGNANCY

Newness or creation in your life, a new aspect of self is being formed and coming into being!... DreamPedia

132 COMMON DREAMS

Goode's Universal Dream Book

ACORNS

To dream of acorns, and that you eat one, denotes you will rise gradually to riches and honour.

If you do not eat, and throw one on the ground, you will quickly get rich, but another will enjoy your property.


ADULTERY

To dream that you have committed it shows great contentions and debates; but to dream you have resisted the temptation, shows victories over your enemies.


ADVERSARIES

To dream you meet with an adversary, denotes that you will overcome some obstacle to your happiness—if you are a lover, you will conqu er some powerful rival, and be happy.


ASSES

To dream you ride an ass, that bears your blows, and the more you beat, the slower his pace, denotes that you will be married to a virtuous industrious wife, but your passion will ruin her.

If the ass mends his pace under your blows, and throws you she will prove incontinent.


ALIAR

To dream you are at the altar, and receive the holy sacrament. is a very unfavourable omen, and denotes many heavy and severe afflictions.


AIR

To dream that you see it cloudy, and afterwards clear and serene, denotes one part of your lifetime will prove unhappy, the latter part the reverse.


ANGLING

To dream you are angling, betokens loose desires in the m ale; such as seeking opportunities of inveigling some innocent female.


ANGER

To dream that you are in a passion and angry with any one, denotes you have many enemies ! if you are in love, be sure that some rival is slandering you to your sweetheart.

If you dream you see another in a passion with you; it is more favourable, if you are in love, your sweetheart will fall sick, and you will experience some weighty loss.


ANGELS

To dream you see angels, is a sure sign that some one is near you—if a woman with child dreams of them, she will have a good time, perhaps twins.


APPLES

To dream of seeing apples, and they eat sweet and ripe, is a sure sign of prosperity, especially to virgins; if they should eat sour, it signifies much sorrow and unhappiness.


APPAREL

To dream that your apparel is proper and suited to the season of the year, denotes prosperity and happiness. To dream you are dressed in new clothes, is a favourable sign, and portends honour and succsss in your undertakings.


APPARITION

So dream you see a ghost, is very unfortunate: If it is of a comely aspect, and dressed in white, it shews deceit and temptation to sin; if you are in love, it is a sign of your not being beloved in turn, and that you are in the habits of friendship with one who is your most inveterate enemy.


ARMS

To dream that your arms are withered and decayed, shows that the person will decline in health or fortune; if they appear to be more plump and grow strong, you will meet with unexpected prosperity; if your arms are broken, you will lose some dear friend by removing to a great distance, if your right arm is cut off, you will loose a near male relation, if the left, a female.


AUTHORITY

It is good always for a rich man to think or dream he is in authority.


BACON

To dream of bacon, denotes the death of some friend or relation, and that enemies will endeavour to do you a mischief; in love, it denotes disappointment and discontent.


BARLEY - BEEAD

To dream of eating barley-bread, betokens health and great comfort to the dreamer.


BOAT

To dream you are in a boat on clear water, is very good, and indicates joy and prosperity.


BULLOCK

To dream a bullock pursues you, beware of some powerful enemy, particular if the dreamer is a female: It a cow, a female is an enemy.


BATHING

To dream you bathe, and the water seems clear, you are sure to prosper, everything will be well with you; but if the sorw. water appears muddy, you will be apt to meet with shame and sorrow.


BED

To dream that you are in bed, implies that he or she will be married at the end of the month.


BREAD

To dream you see a great quantity of loaves, denotes success in life. To dream that you are eating good bread, denotes many friends.


BEES

To dream they sting you, denotes loss of good character, and if you are in love, of your sweetheart.


BALL

To dream of dancing at a ball denotes that you will be addressed by a lover; the prospect will be a momentary pleasure he will become your husband to a certainty


BURIED

To dream yourself or friend is buried, fortells a serious fit of illness.


CHURCH

To dream that you are in church, and that the parson and pulpit are in white, and that he preaches a sermon to your taste, you will soon be married.

If the parson is in black, and the congregation sing a hymn, it denotes grief.


CATS

If a man dreams of a cat, and he caress her, and she scratches him, his sweetheart is a spiteful termagant.

If a female dreams of a cat that acts similarly, she may rest assured that she has a rival.


CLOCK

If you dream the clock falls or breaks, it denotes danger, especially to the sick.

It is always better to dream of counting the hours of the forenoon than the afternoon.


CHEESE

To dream you eat cheese denotes profit.


CAKE

To dream that you make a cake signifies joy and prosperity.


COALS

To dream of clear burning coals, denotes prosperity, especially in love; coals in their natural state indicate trouble and discontent; extinguished coals, announce the fall of fortune, or the death of some near friend.


CLIMBING

To dream you are climbing a tree, and gain the top, you will rise to preferment, or your love will succeed; or if you dream you climb a very steep hill, foretells many difficulties in life.


CANDLE

To dream a candle burns bright and clear denotes a pleasing letter from your sweetheart; but if the candle’s blaze gets cull, you will be disappointed.


CROWNS

To dream of crowns denotes riches and honour.


CARDS

To dream you are playing at cards, it denotes that you will soon be in love.

If you hold a great many court cards, if you are single, you will soon be married and happy.


CORN

To dream you are gathering ripe corn, promises you success in your enterprise, but if it is blighted or mildewed, you will be a great loser.


CARROTS

To dream of them denotes prosperity in life; if you have children they will all thrive, if you are in love your suit will be successful.


DAIRY

To dream you are in a dairy, skimming the cream off the milk, and that your sweetheart partakes of the cream, denotes him inclined to luxury. But if he drinks the milk, it is a sign of frugality.


DARKNESS

To think yourself in the dark, is a token of affliction, and loss in trade; to get out of darkness, into sudden light, is a sign of rising to eminence, or of escaping out of prison.


DEATH

To dream of death, denotes happiness and long life. To see him sink into the ground, is a certain death. The married to dream of death, implies a loss or second union.


D OGS

If they fawn and fondle upon you, it is a lucky omen: if they are barking and snarling at you, then depend that enemies are secretly endeavouring to destroy your reputation; if you are in love be careful of your present sweetheart.


DEVIL

To dream of the devil denotes many troubles.

If he appears in fire immediate misfortunes will befall yau. A widow to dream of the devil, after she has buried a bad husband, is sure to have another—so widows, beware.


DANCING

To dream you are dancing at a ball, or entertainment, fortells you will shortly receive some joyful news from a long absent friend : to the sailor, a pleasant and successful voyage, increase of children to married persons; and to those in trade, much business, and happy in marriage.


DROWNING

To dream you are drowning, or see another so situated, is good to the dreamer, and denotes that he will be preserved through many strange difficulties.


DEBT

To dream you are in debt, and pursued by bailiffs, indicates that you will fall into some unexpected difficulties, or great danger.


ELEPHANT

To dream of an elephant, is a very fortunate dream it denotes an acquirement of riches, and happy wedlock.


EAGLES

To dream you see an eagle or a hawk perched, and they suffer you to caress them, you will be married to a military man, either a officer, serjeant, or private.


EATING

To dream you see others eating, is a bad omen. But if you dream you are asked to eat, and partake of those things you like best, some relief, perhaps will follow.


EGGS

To dream of eggs, is honourable. whatever you are then about will succeed. To dream of broken eggs, if married, you will have no children. But to dream of eating them, you will have many.


EVIL SPIRITS

If you see evil spirits in your dream, it is a sign of sickness, if you seem to exercise them, and they vanish, you will get over your difficulties.


EARTHQUAKE

To dream of an earthquake, warns y ou to be cautious and careful.

If you see houses tumble, your friend s will feel a shock, public confidence is lost, or some dire calamity will defall them.


FLIES

To dream of flies or other vermin, denotes enemies of all sorts. To dream of killing them is a very good omen.


FOX

To dream of a fox is the forerunner of much difficulties, beware of some designing adversaries.


FALL

To dream you fall into the mire, and you are covered with filth, if a servant, you will lose your character through pilfering; if the dirt gets into your eyes, you will experience confinement, most likely be imprisoned; if you see clouds rapidly moving beware of transportation. To run and fall, then rise, and run again, is a sign that you have a litigious temper that will ruin you. But to dream you run without interruption, is a sign of indifference, and that you will accomplish your design.


FIRE

To dream of fire, denotes happiness, health and marriage, and many children. To dream you see burning lights descending, as it were from heaven, is a very bad sign; it portends Some dreadful accident to the dreamer, such as being hanged, loosing your head, having your brains dashed out, breaking a leg, or other strange accidents—to the lover, it also denotes the loss of the affections of your sweetheart.—to the tradesman, bad success in business. To dream that you are burnt by fire, denotes great danger, and that enemies will injure you, to the sailor, storm and ship wreck.


FORTUNE

To dream you make a sudden fort une, is a very bad omen.


FIELDS

If in your dream you are crossing newly ploughed fields, promises some unexpected misfortune from a person who has no children, if the fields are covered with corn, it denotes having children.


FINGER

If you cut your finger and the blood runs, you will get money where you least expect it; if you do not see any blood you will have a quarrel or law suit for money which you paid before.


GIFTS

To dream you have any thing given to you is a sign that some good is about to happen to you; it also denotes that speedy marriage will take place between you and your sweetheart.


GEESE

To dream of geese is the forerunner of good, they denote success and riches, also faithful sweethearts.


GARDEN

If you are walking in a beautiful garden, you will soon be advanced in fortune, if you are gathering the fruits of it, you will be happy in marriage, and have many children.


GALLOWS

To dream of the gallows, is a most fortunate omen, it shows that the dreamer will become rich, and arrive at great honours.


GRAVE

To dream you see a grave, fortells sickness and disappointment, if you are in love, depend you will marry your present sweetheart.


GIANTS

To dream of seeing giants is ominous of good if you are in trade, you will have a great increase of business.


HAIL

Dreaming o f hail, denotes grief and much sorrow.


HATRED

To dream o f being hated, by friends or enemies, is an ill omen.


HILLS

T o dream of travelling over steep hills, shows that you will encounter many difficulties. and enter upon some arduous undertakings; if you descend the hill easily, you will get the better of all your difficulties.


HOUSE

To dream of building a house is a very favourable omen; if you are in trade it denotes success, in love, that your sweetheart is good tempered and faithful, and will make you very happy.


H UNTING

To dream that you are hunting a fox, and that he is killed, shows much trouble through the pretensions of false friends, but that you will discover them, and overcome all their machinations.


INFANTS

To dream of infants shows trouble, and in health, except you see them playing, you may then expect to receive great satisfaction from a distant part.


ICE

Dreaming of ice is a very favourable omen; to the lover it shows your sweetheart is of an amiable temper, and faithful; to the tradesman, it denotes success and riches, to the farmer a plentiful harvest.


IRON

For one to dream he hurt with iron, shows he will receive damage.


KEYS

To dream of keys is favourable, to a person in trade and to a sailor—they denote some gift, and that the dreamer will become rich.


KNIFE

To dream you give a knife, indicates you will have much contention; to give one to your intended, shows he will loose her; she will cut your acquaintance.


LETTER

If you receive a letter in your dream, it betokens a legacy or presents; if you send a letter, you will shortly relieve a person who is in distress.


LADDER

To dream you climb a ladder, denotes a happy marriage with the object of your affections, and that you will become by industry, rich, and settle your children happily.


LINEN

To dream you are dressed in clean linen, denotes that you will shortly receive some glad tidings— if it is dirty, then poverty, a prison and disappointment in love, with the loss of something valuable


LION

To dream of seeing a lion, denotes that you will appear before your betters, accumulate riches, and marry a woman of great spirit.


MEAT

To dream you are buying meat, signifies that friends will step forward, and be of great assistance to you, and that you will overcome difficulties, and acquire great riches


MONEY

To dream of paying money denotes success in you afairs, the birth of a child, or the gain of a law suit; if received, you will thrive.


MOTHER

To dream of seeing your mother, is a certain paognostic of some agreeable adventure being about to happen to you, and that you will hear from a friend at a distance.


NUSIC

To dream you hear delicious music, is a very favourable omen; it denotes joyful news from a long absent friend.


MOON

To dream of the moon is a very favourable omen, it denotes sudden and unexpected joy, great success in love, and that the dreamer is tenderly beloved. To dream of seeing the new moon is good for tradsmen, farmers, and lovers; it is the forerunner of success snd happiness. To handsome women it is a good sign to see a full moon, but not to ugly ones.


M ONKIES

To dream of monkies is ominous ef evil, they announce deceit in love, unfaithfulness in the married state, undutiful children, malibious enemies, and an attack by thieves.


NAKEDNESS

To dream of nakedness, denotes scandal of character, to dream you see a naked woman is lucky; it fortels that some unexpected honours await you.


NIGHTMARE

To dream of being ridden by the nightmare, is a sign of sudden marriage, or to be domineered over by a fool.


OYSTERS

To dream of eating oysters, indicates a coming of much w an t; to open oysters shews we stand in need of assiduity in our business.


ORANGES

To dream you are eating oranges, implies grief and wounds.


OXEN

To dream of seeing fair and white cattle, shows virtuous inclination; to see fat or lean oxen, signifies present gain or mis­fortune.


ORCHARD

To dream you are in an orchard, denotes that you will become rich by the inheritance of a good legacy— that you will marry much to your advantage.


OAK

To dream of seeing the stately oak, is a sign of long life riches, and great gain.


PAPER

To dream you write on paper, signifies an accusation will be made against you.


PICTURES

To dream you are looking at any beautiful pictures, denotes that you will be allured by false appearances into some very disagreeable situation; if you are mrrried, be sure your partn e r deceives you, and prefers another; and that the person who estranged her affections is your most intimate friend.


PIT

To dream of falling into a deep pit, shows that some very heavy misfortune is about to attend you—that your sweetheart is false and prefers another—to a sailor, it forbodes some sad disaster at the next port you touch a t.


PLAYS

Dreaming of seeing a comedy, or farce, indicates sucmuch god, cess in business; to dream of acting in a play, seldom indicates much good.


PURSE

To dream of loosing a purse, signifies good, if it be full; but bad. if it be emty. To dream of finding a purse, is a very favourable omen.


QUARRELLING

To dream you are quarrelling denotes that some unexpected news will reach you. and that your sweetheart is about to marry another.


RAIN

To dream of being in a shower of rain, denotes great success in your undertakings, it is particularly favourable to lovers it denotes costancy, affection and a sweet temper.


RIVER

To dream of seeing river water clear, indicates good but to dream of swimning in the sea signifies great peril and danger.


RATS

To dream of rats, is a sign of many enemies and that you are exposed to many dangers from pretended friends.


READING

To dream you are reading scientific books shows approaching wisdom.


SHEEP

To dream you see a flock of sheep feeding, denotes success in life.


SNOW

To dream you see the ground all covered with snow, is a favourable dream; to a young man; shows he will marry a virgin and have children.x


SHOES

To dream you have a new pair denotes triumph over enemies


SWIMMING

To dream you are swimming with your head under water shows that you will experience some great trouble, and hear some very unpleasant news from a person you thought dear. To dream you are swimming with your head above the water denotes great success in your undertakings, whether they be love, sea farming.


TEETH

To dream you loose your teeth denotes the loss of some friend by death; and that troubles and misfortunes are about to attend you.


TAVERN

To dream you are in a tavern, feasting with friends, signifies joy and comfort


TREASURE

To dream you find a treasure, shows you will be betrayed by your bosom friends.


THIEVES

To dream you fall into the hands of thieves, shows loss and trouble.


THUNDER

Dreamimg of thunder signifies affliction to the rich; but to the poor repose.


TREES

To dream you are cutting down trees, forbodes heavy losses in business; to climb them, denotes advancement in dignity.


VAULTS

To dream o f being in hollow vaults, deep cellars, or at the bottom of coal-pits, signifies that you will match with a widow.


VINEGAR

To dream you drink vinegar, indicates sickness.


VICTUALS

To dream of eating victuals, signifies loss of money V ERMIM. To dream of being covered with vermin, such as lice, betokens long sickness, if the lice remain; bnt if you cast them off yon will be delivered of troubles.


WALKING

To dream you are walking in a dirty muddy place, fortels sickness and vexation; to a lover, it denotes his sweetheart to be bad tempered and unfaithful; to the tradesman, it fortels dishonest servants and loss of goods by fire.


WHEAT

To dream you see or are walking in a field of wheat, denotes great prosperity and riches—in love, a completion of your most sanguine, wishes, and fortels much happiness, with fine children when you marry.


WOLF

To dream of a wolf, signifies an avaricious, cruel, and despotic person; if you dream you conquer a wolf, you will conquer a designing enemy, who has long endeavoured to prey on you—to dream you are bitten by one, shows you will receive some injury from a pretended friend.


WOOD

To dream you are cutting or chopping of wood, shows that you will be happy in your family, and become rich and respectable in life.


WEDDINGS

For a man while sick, to dream of wedding a maid, denotes death; if to a deformed woman, it signifies discontent; to a handsome person much joy.


WINE

To dream of drinking wine with absent friend, signifies a speedy meeting; but to be drinking it by yourself, indicates you will became a great drunkard; and if you do, you may depend on it, it will speedily prove your ruin.


WAR

To dream of war, denotes trouble and danger to all.


WATER

To dream you are drinking water, denotes great trouble and adversity in trade, loss of business and arrest.


WASPS

To dream you are stung by wasps, signifies vexation and trouble by envious persons.


WATER - MILL

To dream of being at one is a favorable omen.


WOOL

To dream you are buying or selling of wool, denoted prosperity and great affluence, by means of industry and trade; to the lover it is a favorable omen; your sweetheart is thereby shown to be of an amiable disposition, very constant, and deeply in love with you.


WIFE

A man to dream that h e sees his wife married to another, it betokeus some change of affairs.


WINDS

To dream of high winds, storms and showers of rain, shows you will be crossed in love.


YELLOW

To dream of yellow colour, denotes to the married women, great trouble from a female friend, and the loss of her husband’s affections. To the lover it signifies he will marry a virgin, who will give herself up to the first man she likes.


YOUNG

To dream you are young, fortels peace, delight, and fruition of your desire.


YOKE

To dream of having to bear the yoke, denotes danger, if it be a woman, she will be ready and willing to obey her husband, and careful to govern her family.


YEW TREE

An indication of the funeral of a very aged person, by whose death the dreamer will derive some benefit, or a protecting hand among the relations of the deceased person.


ZONE

When you dream of zones, fortels much trouble and vexation; to the tradesman, imprisonment, and loss of goods; to the lover, unfaithfulness in his sweetheart, and disappointments in his undertakings.


... Goode's Universal Dream Book

20 COMMON DREAMS

DreamPedia

Partial excerpt from “Dream Language” by Jim & Michal Ann Goll Various ministries and organizations have logged literally thousands of dreams and therefore have been able to decipher the most common dreams that people have.

The following is not a comprehensive list and they are not listed in any particular order, but they are 20 of the most common dreams that people experience.


Dreams of Your House

This one would easily rank in the top five most common dreams. The house normally represents your life, and the circumstances taking place in the house reflect the specific activities in your life. These dreams may also reflect the church as well.

Individual rooms of the house may represent specific things. For instance, if the bedroom appears, the dream may have something to do with issues of intimacy.

The bathroom may represent a need for cleansing. The family room may be a clue that God wants to work on family relationships and so on.


Dreams of Going to School

These dreams often center on taking of tests. The tests may be for the purpose of promotion. Or you might find yourself searching for your next class-an indication that guidance is needed or a graduation has just occurred. You might be repeating a class you took before, possibly meaning that you have an opportunity to learn from past failures. High School dreams may be a sign that you are enrolled in the School of the Holy Spirit (H.S. = High School = Holy Spirit). There are limitless possibilities.

These are just a few examples. Interesting enough, the Teacher is always silent when giving a test!


Dreams of Various Vehicles

These may indicate the calling you have on your life, the vehicle of purpose that will carry you from one point to another. Cars, planes, buses, etc., may be symbols of the type or even the size of the ministry you are or will be engaged in. That’s why there are different kinds of vehicles. Note the color of the vehicle.

If it is a car, what is the make and model? Observe who is driving it. Are you driving or is someone else driving? If someone else is driving, who is it? Do you know the person? Is it a person from your past? If the driver is faceless, this may refer to a person who will appear sometime in your future or that the Holy Spirit Himself is your driving guide.


Dreams Concerning Storms

Storm dreams tend to be intercessory, spiritual warfare-type dreams. They are particularly common for people who have a calling or gift in the area of discerning of spirits. These dreams often hint of things that are on the horizon –both dark, negative storms of demonic attack for the purpose of prayer, intercession, and spiritual warfare, as well as showers of blessing that are imminent. What kind of storm is it? Are there tornadoes involved? What color are they. Tornadoes can indicate change that is coming good or bad. Also tornadoes can indicate great destruction.


Dreams of Flying or Soaring

Flying dreams deal with your spiritual capacity to rise above problems and difficulties and to soar into the heavenlies. These are some of the most inspirational and encouraging in tone of all dreams. When awakening from a dram where you fly or soar, you often wake up feeling exhilarated –even inebriated- in the Spirit.

Ascending-type dreams are more unusual yet edifying. Remember, we are seated with Christ Jesus in heavenly places far above all principalities and powers.


Dreams of Being Naked or Exposed

These dreams indicate that you will be or are becoming transparent and vulnerable.

Depending on your particular situation, this may be exhilarating or fearful and could reveal feelings of shame. Note: these dreams are not meant to produce embarrassment but rather draw you into greater intimacy with the Lord and indicate places where greater transparency is required. These types of dreams often appear during times of transition where you are being dismantled in order to be re-mantled.


Dreams of Condition of Your Teeth

Often, these dreams reveal the need for wisdom. Are your teeth loose, rotten, falling out, or are they bright and shiny? Do you have a good bite? Are you able to chew your cud? Teeth represent wisdom, and often teeth appear to loose in a dream.

What does that mean? It may mean that you need a wisdom application for something you are about to bit off. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.


Dreams of Past Relationships

This kind of dream may indicate that you are being tempted to fall back into old patterns and ways of thinking. Depending upon who the person is in the dream, and what this person represents to you, these dreams might also be an indication of your need to renew your former desires and godly passions for good things in life.

Seeing a person from your past does not usually mean that you will literally renew your old relationship with that individual. Look more for what that person represents in your life – for good or bad. A person who was bad in your life may represent God’s warning to you not to relapse into old habits and mind-sets that were not profitable. On the other hand, a person who was good in your life may represent God’s desire or intention to restore good times that you thought were gone.


Dreams of Dying

These dreams are not normally about the person seen in the dream in a literal sense, but are symbolic about something that is passing away or departing from your life. The type of death may be important to note. Watch, though, to see if resurrection is on the other side.


Dreams of Birth

Normally these dreams are not about an actual childbirth but rather about new seasons of purpose and destiny coming forth into your life.

If a name is given to the child, pay close attention because that usually indicates that a new season in the purposes of God is being birthed. There are, of course, exceptions to this where an actual pregnancy and birth is going to take place.


Dreams of Taking a Shower

These are cleansing-type dreams (toilets, showers, bathtubs, etc) revealing things that are in the process of being flushed out of your life, cleansed and flushed away. These are good dreams by the way. Enjoy the showers of God’s love and mercy and get cleansed from the dirt of the world and its ways. Apply the blood of Jesus and get ready for a new day!


Dreams of Falling

These dreams may reveal a fear you have of losing control of some area of your life or, on the positive side, that you are actually becoming free of directing your own life.

What a substance you fall into in the dream is a major key to proper understanding. The outstanding primary emotions in these dreams will indicate which way to interpret them. Falling can be fearful, but it can also represent falling into the ocean of God’s love.


Dreams of Chasing and Being Chased

Chasing dreams often reveal enemies that are at work, coming against your life and purpose. On the opposite side, they may indicate the passionate pursuit of God in your life, and you towards Him. Are you being chased? By whom? What emotions do you feel? Are you afraid of being caught? Or maybe you are the one doing the chasing. Who are you chasing? Why? Again, what emotions do you feel during the chase? The answers to these questions and, particularly, the dominant emotions in the dream, will often help determine the direction of its interpretation. Often the Lord appears in various forms, motioning to us, saying, “Catch Me if you can!”


Dreams of Relatives, Alive and Dead

Most likely, these dreams indicate generational issues at work in your life –both blessings and curses. You will need discernment as to whether to accept the blessing or cut off the darkness. This is particularly true if grandparents appear in your dreams, as they will typically indicate generational issues.


Dreams Called Nightmares

Nightmares tend to be more frequent with children and new believers in Christ, just as calling dreams do. They may reveal generational enemies at work that need to be cut off. Stand against the enemies of fear. Call forth the opposite presence of the amazing love of God, which casts out fear, the fear has torment!


Dreams of Snakes

The snake dream is probably one of the most common of all the categories of animal dreams. These dreams reveal the serpent – the devil with his demonic hosts- at work through accusation, lying, attacks, etc. Other common dreams of this nature include dreams of spiders, bears, and even alligators. Spiders and bears are two other major animals that appear in dreams that show fear. The spider in particular, releasing its deadly poison, is often a symbol of witchcraft and the occult.


Dreams of Dogs and Cats

After snakes, the most common animal to appear in dreams is the dog. A dog in your dream usually indicates friendship, loyalty, protection, and good feelings. On the other hand, dog dreams may also reveal the dark side, including growling, attacking, biting, ect. Sometimes these dreams reveal a friend who is about to betray you.


Dreams of Going Through Doors

These dreams generally reveal change that is coming. New ways, new opportunities, and new advancements are on the way. Similar to dreams of doors are dreams including elevators or escalators, which indicate that you are rising higher into your purpose and your calling.


Dreams of Clocks and Watches

Clocks or watches in a dream reveal what time it is in your life, or the need for a wake-up call in the Body of Christ or in a nation.

It is time to be alert and watchful.


These dreams may indicate a Scripture verse as well, giving a deeper message. Are you a watchman on the walls? If so, what watch are you on?


Dreams with Scripture Verses

Sometimes you may have a dream in which Bible passages appear, indicating a message from God. This phenomenon may occur in a number of ways: verbal quotes where you are actually hear a voice quoting a passage, digital clock-type readouts, and dramatizations of a scene from a Bible, just to name a few. Quite often these are watchmen-type dreams, dreams of instructions filled with ways of wisdom.... DreamPedia

A BRIEF DICTIONARY OF DREAMS FROM THE KABBALAH

Dreampedia

ABYSS
Danger related to an intense emotional situation. You should be cautious when interacting with others in very emotional circumstances.

ACADEMY
Denotes knowledge, especially of a philosophical and metaphysical nature. Intensive study will favor the dreamer.

ANGEL
An elevated characteristic, like friendliness, compassion, or An elevated characteristic, like friendliness, compassion, or healing, is found in the dreamer’s life. A direct encounter with an angel indicates that you should strengthen said quality.

ARM
Strength and great achievement. The dreamer has power in a particular situation. If the arm appears wounded, it symbolizes that this power grows weaker.

BABY
Something is born, possibly a relationship.

BRIDGE
Transition from one situation or point of view to another. The dreamer is experiencing a positive change in his life and attitude.

BRIGHT STAR
Divinity. Proximity of favorable events and good luck.

BLINDNESS
The dreamer cannot, or does not want to, see the truth about a part of their life. Dreams in which you are surrounded by darkness have the same meaning.

BOOK OR PARCHMENT
Knowledge is near.

CANDLE
It is the human soul. A candle that burns represents a strong soul; one that is dying little by little indicates a weakness of character.

CAVE
A place to take refuge from a threatening or stressful situation.

CHILD
Represents innocence and ingenuity, the desire to learn which benefits intellectual development. Sign of the importance the dreamer places on this virtue.

COFFIN, TOMB, OR CEMETERY
Something has died in the dreamer’s life. Everything will be fine if you accept it and move forward strongly.

COMET
A great change is coming in the life of the dreamer. It will be beneficial, but could bring a sudden loss of something, a disruption, or an unexpected turn.

CORPSE
Something has died and is rotting in your life. You should determine what it is and act immediately to “bury” it.

CLIMBING
The dreamer is searching for greater satisfaction from life. This image is very positive and signifies inner growth and advancement.

CRUISE
Higher spiritual growth and transformation. If the ship moves quietly over calm waters, the dreamer will find little stress in their life. If the waves are rough, on the other hand, it foretells tensions.

CUP or CHALICE
Divine blessing; very positive if it is gold or silver. If it is broken, it means the blessing will be rejected.

DANCING
Happiness and fun in the dreamer’s life.

DAGGER or WEAPON
Personal violence. Denotes that the dreamer is furious and holds feelings of aggressiveness inside.

DAWN, SUNRISE
A new start, either in a relationship or a job.

DAWN, SUNRISE
A new start, either in a relationship or a job.

DEAFNESS
The dreamer is ignoring the good advice of a friend or loved one. Indicates that you don’t want to hear a truth you are being told in real life.

DEMON
Symbolizes the lower passions such as jealousy, resentment, or vengeance. The dreamer should remove these from their life as soon as possible.

DESERT
Spiritual aridity in some aspect of the dreamer’s life. A way of avoiding it is to find a manner of achieving more productivity and spiritual wealth.

DARKNESS
Absence of divinity and saintliness. Ignorance. The more darkness that appears in the dream, the less spiritual illumination the dreamer will have.

DOOR
A barrier that can be overcome with willpower. Closed doors symbolize a lack of the right attitude when approaching a certain situation.

DOVE
Peace in general; pacific resolution of a particular situation. DUST. Humility before the greatness of God. Associated with destiny. It reminds you that you should cultivate qualities of deference and submission.

DRAGON OR MONSTER
Demonic or spiritually negative forces, such as black magic or malevolence. The dreamer should avoid any matter in life related to such aspects.

EAGLE
Imagination and creativity. If it flies very high it represents a greater emergence of these qualities; an eagle nest is safe place to strengthen them.

EARTH
The world is means of life, where all creatures must fight for their existence. Indicates that the dreamer has too many mundane worries.

ECHO
Everything you do echoes and has repercussions in the hidden worlds. Dreams of this kind remind you of said spiritual truth.

ELDER
Eternal wisdom, especially religious. The dreamer should seek this quality in their life.

EYE
A human eye represents that the dreamer has a correct judgment about some matter or situation. If the eye is wounded or blind, it means the opposite.

FALLING
The dreamer is falling in a lower level of consciousness and feels negative emotions such as rage, pride, or fear. Without exception, it is a negative symbol.

FISH
Abundance and material blessing in the dreamer’s life. Money,

FISH
Abundance and material blessing in the dreamer’s life. Money, properties, and other possessions will increase.

FIRE
Divine judgment of the imperfections and bad acts of the dreamer. Fire also indicates a need for exhaustive moral cleansing and self purification.

FIRMAMENT
Divine order in the universe that translates to the dreamer’s life.

FLYING
Freedom from mundane worries. Also means that you should use your imagination to experience a greater sensation of freedom when facing trivial problems.

FOUNTAIN
A good emotional state, vitality. The more water that flows, the greater capacity you have to express positive emotions, such as gratitude and compassion.

FUNERAL
Something has died in the dreamer’s life; a job, a relationship, or even an important belief.

GAZELLE
Precise and elegant decision that the dreamer should make. A very positive symbol.

GARDEN
Liveliness in attitude and beliefs. Reveals an excellent perspective and spiritual growth.

GENITALS
Generative capacity, the dreamer’s potent creativity.

GETTING LOST
The dreamer has gone astray, has diverted from the soul’s mission and his purpose in life. You must regain your spiritual orientation, above all.

GIANT
Egomania, pride, and arrogance. The dreamer or someone close to them is behaving ungenerously.

GOAT
Great ability to overcome and resist. The dreamer needs to develop other elevated qualities such as imagination or esthetic sense.

GREEN FIELDS
The dreamer’s life is full of vitality and good intentions.

HAIR
Virility and sexuality. If it is thick and voluptuous, it denotes sensuality; the opposite if you lose it. Brushing your hair is a sign of vanity.

HEBREW ALPHABET
Each of the twenty-two letters has a specific meaning. In dreams, they indicate elevated communication.

HIGHWAY
Symbolizes the road or life journey. If it is well traveled, it means the dreamer enjoys a close relationship with others. If the opposite, it denotes loneliness.

HORIZON
The near future. A clear horizon represents good luck; a hard one, on the other hand, indicates problems.

HUNGER
Physical or emotional deprivation. The dreamer feels some

HUNGER
Physical or emotional deprivation. The dreamer feels some bodily or personal need unsatisfied.

ILLNESS
The dreamer lacks balance in their life and soon could experience physical or emotional disorder.

JEWEL
Divine illumination. The more beautiful or brilliant it is, the greater the spirituality that will shine in your life.

JOURNEY
The present path of the dreamer. If the setting of the dream seems strange, it indicates a new situation or challenges. The presence of companion is a good sign; their absence denotes isolation.

KING
Power and divine judgment. Emphasizes the importance of these qualities in the dreamer’s life.

KISS
The taste of the transcendental soul. Whether consciously or not, we experience said condition in some aspect of life.

LAMB
Submission and sweetness. A shepherd directing his flock signifies that you are taking special care with a certain situation.

LAMP
Spiritual knowledge and wisdom. The Zohar speaks of a lamb of darkness, which is associated with evil and discord.

LEG
Resistance, especially in journeys by foot. Signifies that the dreamer has the strength necessary to successfully resolve a problematic situation.

LIGHT
Divinity, saintliness, and wisdom. This is a superior symbol.

LIMP
Inability to resolve a certain situation, caused by yourself or by external circumstances.

LION
Courage and spiritual strength. Traditionally, the lion also represents the Jewish community. The image of a lion nuzzling its cubs indicates that you give courage to others.

MARKET
Sustenance of human existence. Indicates your worries about how to earn a living.

MAKING LOVE
Ecstasy of the soul when it refers to a union with God.

MOON
Fantasy, intuition, and receptiveness in the soul of the dreamer. Traditionally, it is related to other hidden aspects of the soul, like imagination and creativity. Equally, it is associated with femininity. MIDNIGHT, however, represents a time of mystic study and contemplation.

MORNING
State of spiritual satisfaction and happiness. Also associated with physical pleasure, well-being, or healing.

MOUNTAIN
Place of divine inspiration and revelation. Indicates that the dreamer needs to find this place in real life.

MOUTH
Human speech and the capacity to create harmony or conflict. The dreamer should pay attention to the effect their words cause. The dreamer should pay attention to the effect their words cause. A wounded mouth symbolizes a lack of communicative skills.

NIGHT
Judgment and dark qualities. Night is usually associated with demonic forces and emotional negativity.

OASIS
A place of rejuvenation and replenishment. Indicates the end of the feeling of spiritual sterility in the dreamer’s life. It is a positive symbol.

PALACE
Dwelling of the divine. The dreamer should seek more consciously the sacred side of daily life.

PLANETS
Subtle, hidden forces in the life of the dreamer. Traditionally, the vision of this symbol was astrological and it was believed that it exercised a concrete influence on our daily experiences.

PLAYING AN INSTRUMENT
Exaltation and spiritual pleasure; also, experiencing the sacred through an esthetic activity.

QUEEN
Divine love and compassion. Her oneiric presence confirms the importance of these characteristics in the dreamer’s life.

RAINBOW
Protection and divine security. A hopeful and encouraging symbol for the life of the dreamer.

RIVER, STREAM
The vital spirituality is flowing correctly. Soon a positive change or great experience will arrive.

SNAKE
Deception and malevolence, disguised as sincerity and attention. Warns that there is someone or something in your life that may be dangerous.

SINGING
Gratitude. The act of singing, whether it is the dreamer or other people, means that you will soon have something to be grateful for and to celebrate.

SKY
The spiritual world; the intangible, pure, subtle, and mystic part of life. A cloudless sky signifies clarity; if it is clouded, it means there is confusion.

SLEEPING
Ignorance, passivity, and withdrawal. In its most positive interpretation, it represents waiting without hurry. Falling asleep symbolizes loss of consciousness and acuity.

STAIR
Character development and personal growth.

STAGNANT WATER
Blockage in the life energy, especially in the spiritual sense.

STRONG WIND
The force of change. To dream of this element means your life will undergo a complete metamorphosis. Hurricanes indicate that said change will be very violent.

STUDY
Acquisition of knowledge, above all spiritual. It is a positive dream that indicates the dreamer is above all spiritual. It is a positive dream that indicates the dreamer is developing internally.

SUN
Will and intention. The sunrise represents the birth of something new in your life. The sunset indicates that some matter is ending. Traditionally it is also associated with masculinity and it’s most characteristic traits such as stubbornness—in a positive sense as well as negative.

TEETH
Physical vitality. Losing teeth is a warning to the dreamer about their health.

THIRST
Spiritual desire. Represents that the dreamer is not receiving the spiritual satisfaction they desire.

THRONE
Physical manifestation of the divine. Indicates that the dreamer must be more conscious of the sacred side of their body.

TREE
Life and spiritual knowledge. A flowering tree also represents deserved success; a bare tree denotes a lack of achievement.

TRIPPING
Impatience and too much hurry in daily matters. You need calm and balance to avoid the possibility of a serious fall.

TURTLE
Good luck in life.

UNOPENED LETTER
The dreamer did not heed a very important message. It is necessary to pay attention immediately to any communication received in real life.

WAKING UP
The dreamer is recovering clarity, acuity, and personal energy to complete some personal matter.

WAVY OCEAN
Pride and arrogance. This dream indicates that the dreamer must cultivate humility.

WEDDING
Spiritual compromise, possibly related to a field of study, training, or an effort in the long term.

WILD
The absence of civilization. A place of power and potential danger.... Dreampedia

A FEW QUESTIONS AND SUBJECTIVE ANSWERS REGARDING DREAMS

Dreampedia

What is a dream?
  • A dream is an event transpiring in that world belonging to the mind when the objective senses have withdrawn into rest or oblivion. Then the spiritual man is living alone in the future or ahead of objective life and consequently lives man’s future first, developing conditions in a way that enables waking man to shape his actions by warnings, so as to make life a perfect existence.

What relationship is sustained between the average man and his dreams?

  • A dream to the average or sensual person, bears the same relation to his objective life that it maintained in the case of the ideal dreamer, but it means pleasures, sufferings and advancements on a lower or material plane.

Then why is man not always able to correctly interpret his dreams?

  • Just as words fail sometimes to express ideas, so dreams fail sometimes in their mind pictures to portray coming events.

If they relate to the future, why is it we so often dream of the past?

  • When a person dreams of past events, those events are warnings of evil or good; sometimes they are stamped so indelibly upon the subjective mind that the least tendency of the waking mind to the past throws these pictures in relief on the dream consciousness.

Why is it that present environments often influence our dreams?

  • Because the future of man is usually affected by the present, so if he mars the present by wilful wrongs, or makes it bright by right living it will necessarily have influence on his dreams, as they are fore castings of the future.

What is an apparition?

  • It is the subjective mind stored with the wisdom gained from futurity, and in its strenuous efforts to warn its present habitation-- the corporal body--of dangers just ahead, takes on the shape of a dear one as the most effective method of imparting this knowledge.

How does subjectivity deal with time?

  • There is no past and future to subjectivity. It is all one living present.

If that is so, why can’t you tell us accurately of our future as you do of our past?

  • Because events are like a procession; they pass a few at a time and cast a shadow on subjective minds, and
... Dreampedia

AGE AND DREAMS

Dreampedia

Sleep patterns vary markedly across different age groups, with people sleeping progressively less soundly in later life. Stage 4, or deep sleep, in particular, practically disappears among the elderly. Studies of dreams through the life cycle have shown less dramatic patterns. For instance, in one study that subdivided subjects into four age groups—21–34, 35–49, 50–64, and 65 and over subjects in the 21–34 and 50–64 groups reported having more dreams than the other two groups.

Content-wise, the most dramatic finding was a direct correlation between age and frequency of dreams about death and dying. Dream content also changes among the retired (especially the institutionalized) elderly, who often experience dreams about lack of resources.

Finally, dreams among those who are dying often include the theme of life after death.... Dreampedia

ANIMAL DREAMS

Dreampedia

Humans have been dreaming about animals for ages. It has been speculated that some of the ancient cave paintings of animals may perhaps be dream images from cave dwellers whose lives were mostly spent chasing, hunting, and taming animals. In ancient Egypt, human-figured deities with animal heads suggest dreams images.

A study carried out by Robert L. Van de Castle found a larger number of animal dreams in children than in adults. Dreams of a group of 741 children (383 girls and 358 boys) aged four to six- teen were examined for the presence of animal figures. The frequency for each animal figure at each age level was tabulated for girls and boys. Animal figures were present in 39.4 percent of dreams from the four- and five-year-old children. The percentage steadily dropped for each subsequent age grouping (six- and seven-year-olds, 35.5 percent; eight- and nine-year-olds, 33.6 percent; ten- and eleven-year-olds, 29.8 percent; twelve- and thirteen-year-olds, 21.9 percent; and fourteen- through sixteen-year-olds, 13.7 percent).

Boys had higher animal percentage figures at ages four through six (44 percent, versus 34 per- cent for girls), while girls had higher animal dreams at ages nine through eleven (36 percent, versus 26 percent for boys). Overall, animal figures appeared in 29 percent of the combined girls’ dreams and 29.6 percent of the combined boys’ dreams. There were more than three times as many animal figures in the dreams of children as there were in the dreams of adults. The seven most frequent animal figures for children were dogs (30), horses (28), cats (15), snakes (15), bears (14), lions (13), and monsters (e.g., wolfman) (13).

If the frequencies for all animal figures are considered, it is clear that children dream more frequently of large and threatening wild animals, while college students dream more often of pets and domesticated animals. Bears, lions, tigers, gorillas, elephants, bulls, dinosaurs, dragons, and monsters accounted for twenty-seven percent of the animal figures in children’s dreams but only seven percent of the animal figures in adult dreams. This collection of wild animals appeared more frequently (forty-four times) in boys’ dreams than in girls’ dreams (twenty-seven times). Several theorists have suggested that these large, threatening animals may represent parental figures in the dreams of children.

An interesting gender difference was found in the types of animal figures. Women and girls reported significantly more mammals, while men and boys reported significantly more nonmammals. This may indicate females identify at some level with other forms of life that nurse their young with mammary glands, and this identification is reflected in the type of animals that appear in their dreams.

The meaning of animals in dream ... Dreampedia

ANTHROPOLOGY OF DREAMS

Dreampedia

Anthropology has contributed considerably to the cross-cultural understanding of dreams. The earliest anthropological research on dreams, which dates back to the end of the nineteenth century, considered the dream beliefs and practices of other cultures as evidence of their savagery, in contrast to modern Western civilization’s relative disinterest in dreams. The only area of investigation where dreams played a significant role was psychoanalysis, and psychoanalysis had a tendency to portray dreams as primitive and childish, thus reinforcing the dominant negative image of dreams. With the spread of psychoanalytic theories, various anthropologists tried to prove the accuracy of Sigmund Freud’s ideas about dreams by analyzing of dream experiences of non-Western people.

Some anthropologists, such as Kilton Stew- art, provided romantic idealizations of dream practices in non-Western cultures. According to Stewart, the Senoi of Malaysia reportedly lived a trouble-free life based on their reverence for dreams. Stewart, who lived with the Senoi in 1935, wrote that “the absence of violent crime, armed conflict, and mental and physical diseases ... can only be explained on the basis of institutions which produce a high state of psychological integration and emotional maturity, along with social skills and attitudes that promote creative rather than destructive interpersonal relations” (Stewart, p. 160—see Sources). According to Stewart’s study, the collective life of the Senoi centered around a complex dream psychology that served to integrate the community. However, his theory was soon seriously challenged, and anthropological research on dreams lost credibility.

Anthropologists have long been interested in cross-cultural experiences of dreaming and interpretations of dreams, concentrating especially on the latter interest, rather than focusing on the dream as an experience. With the publication of Dreaming: Anthropological and Psychological Interpretations (1987), edited by Barbara Ted- lock, anthropology emerged as a major field of dream research with important insights to con- tribute to the modern study of dreams.

According to the authors of Dreaming, which is a collection of essays based on fieldwork con- ducted among various peoples of Central and South America, the culture to which the individual belongs largely determines the social context in which the dream is narrated and how it is interpreted. Dreaming experience also reflects important beliefs about reality, death, the soul, and the boundaries between self and others. Thus, to achieve a good understanding of dream experiences of other groups, it is fundamental to fully understand their culture through the study of their language, their social institutions, and their psychological, philosophical, and religious beliefs.

Tedlock’s anthropological research indicates that many other cultures draw lines between more and less meaningful dreams. Also, as one might anticipate, in many non-Western cultures dream- ing has religious meaning, in that dreams reflect a culture’s spiritual beliefs, and may even create new religious imagery that can influence the individual’s as well as the whole society’s religious orientation.

... Dreampedia

ANXIETY DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One of the most frequent dream themes is that of anxiety in some form. This may not be because most dreams are about things we fear, but simply because we re­member those dreams more than a bland dream. In our dreams the things we fear are only our own feelings. Of course, the dream may be about a snake, or car accident—things we fear which are not inside us. Even so, it is our feeling about the snake or situation which disturbs us, and these can change, even though the snake remains just what it is.

If we cannot meet our feelings of fear or emotional pain we are controlled or trapped by them. Sometimes we need the help of a professional therapist to meet what we fear, but many fears can be met by using simple techniques. See woljunder animal, dream processing, premenstrual tension. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

ANXIETY DREAMS

Dreampedia

Some researchers believe that anxiety dreams reflect a time when our ancestors were constantly threatened by danger from predators and other environmental factors. You will never be attacked by a sabre-toothed tiger, but if you are the object of savage criticism by your boss those ancient feelings of fear for your survival may be triggered deep within your unconscious mind and be reflected in your dreams.

Many anxiety dreams carry a message that your attitude to someone or something is unrealistic, or that you are heading in the wrong direction. If the dream keeps recurring, it’s a sure sign that you have unfinished ‘emotional business’ to resolve.

Here are some of the most common anxiety dreams, each of which has several potential meanings. The correct interpretation is the one that most accurately mirrors your inmost feelings about yourself and your situation.... Dreampedia

ARCHETYPAL HEALING DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Jung thought that dreams tell us things about ourselves that we might not already know, giving us information that contrasts with our conscious understanding of our feelings, thoughts and desires. Jung also believed that dreams can help us find our true vocation and life purpose. Those who listen to this inner guidance often find new directions in life that set them on a course of great fulfillment and happiness. In other words, dreams can have a healing function.

Archetypal symbols in our dreams, Jung taught, are especially important as they carry potent healing energy, enabling us to change on inner levels that bypass pure intellect. The unconscious mind actually‘speaks’ in symbols—symbols are its language—so we accomplish change most powerfully when we communicate with the inner self using archetypal symbols instead of words. Let us say, for example, that you have an exceptionally clear and vivid dream about a robed, bearded figure—a typical image of the wise old man—and he is floating outside the windows of your home. Since the home often represents yourself, the dream might make you aware that you are seeing wisdom outside of yourself instead of within. But the presence of the archetypal symbol also tells us that our higher self seeks to intervene!

Or let’s say you dreamed of a valiant hero or heroine rescuing you from extreme danger. You may be hoping to be rescued by someone in your waking life. Your dreaming mind is urging you to accept assistance if it is given to you; it may also be urging you to find the hero or heroine, in other words courage, within yourself. Or you might have an archetypal dream of a mother bear. In the dream, this archetype of the great mother might be cuffing her young or refusing to feed them. Such a scene would give you important information about how you are nurturing others or yourself. Perhaps you neglected your basic needs. In some way, you are not ‘mothering yourself’ in a healthy and beneficial manner; your higher self seeks to call this to your attention.

On the other hand, in a time of loneliness in your life, you might dream of being held and comforted by a great mother figure—and wake up from the dream feeling energized and ready to go on. The great mother in your dream, in a very real way,‘kissed it and made it better’. In looking at these two views of the mother, you can see the opposite sides that Jung pointed out were an essential aspect of all archetypes. It is through integrating this duality that you can become whole and at peace.... The Element Encyclopedia

BIRTH DREAMS DURING PREGNANCY

The Element Encyclopedia

Pregnancy is one of the most life-changing, and physically and emotionally demanding challenges a woman can face in her lifetime. Research shows that the dreams of pregnant women can comment on the physical, psychological and emotional issues she has to deal with. The most common dream themes at this time concern animals and water. In the early stages of the pregnancy, these dreams may be gentle and calming, but towards the end of the pregnancy they can be traumatic or even become nightmares. Such alarming dreams are considered a normal reaction to the anxiety every woman unconsciously feels about her unborn baby and about giving birth.

It is also very common for pregnant women to dream about having the baby and these dreams are again often bizarre and disturbing; for example, dreaming about a baby that is born dead, malformed or with a monster’s head. It has been suggested that such anxiety dreams serve a purpose: they release a lot of unconscious tension and fear, allowing the mother to be more relaxed at birth.... The Element Encyclopedia

BLACK AND WHITE DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

To dream in black and white suggests that you need to be more objective in formulating your decisions. You may be a little too unyielding in your thought processes, and thus need to find some sort of balance between two opposing views. Consider the views and opinions of others. Alternatively, black and white dreams may be a sign of depression or sadness. You may feel that there is not enough excitement in your life.

It is a quite commonly held belief that we only dream in black and white, but many people are able to identify tones of color in their dreams.

If this is the case, why is it believed that we only dream in black and white? It may be because dreams that appear to be black and white only appear so because the color is not relevant. This doesn’t necessarily mean, however, that such dreams are in black and white. Black and white is a function of television when the color information is removed, but the same is not true of the mind. For example, grass might not be green in a dream, but it’s not gray as it is in a black and white movie; the color simply is not relevant and your unconscious isn’t highlighting it. This non-relevance fools the conscious mind on waking up into concluding that, by implication, the dream must have been in black and white.

A black funeral may suggest difficulties in, or the need for a new approach to, a relationship or work issue, as the current approach is doomed. Or are you grieving for a phase or aspect of your life that has recently come to an end? As stated above, black often represents the death of new ideas, so could your dream be telling you to prepare for the transition? Black animals that appear in dreams are usually associated with notions of temptation, unconscious drives and urges, whilst black clothes and underwear are a symbol of hidden or unconscious feelings, or sexuality. A night dream scene shrouded in darkness may relate to a certain lack of direction in your waking life. According to traditional symbolism, black is also associated with wickedness, so if you are menaced by a person wearing black in your dream, could the dream be a depiction of your darkest fears. Do you worry that someone is a threat to you or are you your own worst enemy?

Keywords: the unknown, the unconscious, danger, mystery, darkness, death, mourning, hate and malice.... The Element Encyclopedia

BLIND PEOPLE AND DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

People who are blind do dream. The dreams of people who have been blind from a very early age (called ’congenital blindness’) tend to be different to those who are blind now but who had sight before. Those who are congenitally blind often have dreams that include more instances of sounds. Both groups experience dreams as imaginatively rich as those of sighted people.

Dreams are a universal feature of the human mind. Carl Jung even believed that visions in our dreams offer glimpses into universal archetypes, instinctive primordial images derived from a collective unconscious built into the very structure of the human brain. You might think, then, that even blind people could tap into this instinctive pool of primordial images and see them in their dreams.

There have been studies into whether or not congenitally blind people dream in visual images, but the findings have been mixed— some studies conclude that congenitally blind people do not dream in visual images, whilst other reports conclude that may do. The general consensus is that although people who are blind certainly do dream, their dreams are believed to be visual only to the extent that they can see, or could see before their blindness, in their waking life. People who are blind from birth are believed to have dreams that are primarily auditory, with their other intact senses participating to about the same degree that they do in a sighted person’s dreams. Such people are not thought to dream in visual images. People who are legally blind but are able to see blurs of movement, light and color would have a visual dimension to their dreams matching what they see when they are awake.... The Element Encyclopedia

BREAKDOWN / BREAKTHROUGH DREAMS

Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction).... Strangest Dream Explanations

BUSY DREAMS

Little Giant Encyclopedia

These are usually a sign of much activity during the day (less often, a suggestion to be more active). In contrast, being an observer in the dream means to be less passive. These dreams may also point to too much stress, indicating that your life has become too frantic. Try to determine whether you see yourself as being very active in the dream or if you seem to be disappearing from view.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

CAN DREAMS COME TRUE?

Dreampedia

In 1953, in order to test the possibility of ESP through dreaming—that is, dreams that predict the future or contact others telepathically—a New York psychiatrist named Montague Ulman designed an experiment that involved using a “sender” and a “receiver.”

In this experiment, Ulman attached electrodes of an electroencephalograph (a machine that records brain waves) to the person acting as the receiver. This person would then go to sleep in one room. The “sender” was placed in a different room. When the machine indicated the brain wave pattern that showed the receiver had fallen asleep, the sender opened a sealed envelope that contained a “target” image and concentrated fully on the picture in an attempt to influence the receiver’s dream.

Once, when Ulman himself was acting as the sender, his thoughts strayed from the target image and he began to think about the book Spartacus, which had been made into a movie. The person acting as the receiver dreamed about the movie! Although his results were not all this successful, experiences such as this convinced Ulman that dream ESP was deserving of more research. So in 1962, with Stanley Krippner, he opened a dream laboratory in Brooklyn at Maimonides Medical Center. Although the two men’s experiments continued to produce mixed results, Ulman felt the experiments proved at least the existence of dream telepathy, though not its reliability.

Having experienced instances of ESP in my own dreams, I must concur with the doctors about its reality. Here is an example of a precognitive dream from my own files:

  • The Dream: I am taken to a place where seminars are being held. Someone tells me that this is the same place that B. (a psychic healer friend of mine) studied. I peek around the corner and hear a man say, “Abadie is doing rocks.”
  • I woke up feeling there was significance for me in “rocks,” but at the time I couldn’t figure out what it might be. Still, the word hung in my mind. A year later, I began working with crystals both for healing and telepathy.
... Dreampedia

CAPTURING YOUR DREAMS: HOW TO RECALL AND RECORD

Dreampedia

“Dreams are illustrations...from the book your soul is writing about you.”
Marsha Norman

We all dream several dreams a night and it’s been suggested that we each have 100,000 dreams over the course of our lives. So you might be wondering why you can’t remember a single one. Medications, alcohol, too little sleep and anxiety about the content of our dreams can all block dream recall.

We’re most likely to remember the dreams closest to awakening, but with a little effort you can boost your dream recall. In fact the more attention you pay to your dreams, by thinking about them, writing them down, working with them, the more likely you are to remember them. Keeping a note pad and a pen beside your bed and recording your dreams immediately on waking is one of the best ways to help your dream recall.

Some dreams fade quickly from memory, so it is crucial you capture them as soon as you can. Immediately on waking, write down your dream or dreams —even if this is in the middle of the night; don’t brush your teeth first or leave it until your alarm clock goes off. If you do that, you’ll probably forget all about it and will lose a valuable dream. If you record your dreams in words, you create permanent reminders that you can use to help you figure out what they are trying to tell you.

Later in the day, transfer the information to a dream diary, specifically set aside for your dreams. In this diary include: the date of your dream, any people involved, the moods and feelings expressed, prominent colors, numbers, or shapes, the problems and conflicts encountered, prominent symbols or stories, information about the dream landscape, whether it was past, present or future and, finally, how the dream ended.

With practice, you will soon get the hang of remembering and writing down your dreams. Use this encyclopedia to help you unlock the meaning of your dream themes and symbols, but never forget that the best book you will ever read about dreams is the one you write yourself: your dream journal.


Programing your mind for dream recall

Some dreams are so vivid you can’t forget them but many are so fleeting they can vanish without a trace. One way to make sure you remember them is to talk to yourself in a positive way. Before going to sleep tell yourself that you will remember your dreams on waking. Try this visualization technique.

When you feel sleepy, turn off the lights and settle down in your favorite sleeping position. In a relaxed way, think about your dreams. Breathe in for a count of five, and out for a count of ten. Repeat this, and then breathe normally. Now imagine you have just woken in the morning and, as you slowly move back into consciousness, you reach for your pen and write down your dream. Bring your attention to the present again, and feel comfortable, warm and sleepy. Tell yourself that in the morning you will remember your dreams.... Dreampedia

CARL JUNG ON DREAMS

Dreampedia

Jung studied under the tutelage of Sigmund Freud. Their differing views on dreams and dream interpretations led to a permanent rift that led them to go their separate ways.

Like Freud, Jung believed in the existence of the unconscious. However, he didn’t see the unconscious as animalistic, instinctual, and sexual; he saw it as

more spiritual. Dreams were a way of communicating and acquainting ourselves with the unconscious. Dreams were not attempts to conceal our true feelings from the waking mind, but rather they were a window to our unconscious. They served to guide the waking self to achieve

wholeness. Dreams offered a solution to a problem we are facing in our waking life.

Jung viewed the ego as one’s sense of self and how we portray ourselves to the world. Part of Jung’s theory was that all things can be viewed as paired opposites (i.e. good/evil, male/female, or love/hate). And thus working in opposition to the ego, is the “counter-ego” or what he referred to as the shadow. The shadow represents rejected aspects of yourself that you do not wish to acknowledge. It is considered an aspect of yourself which is somewhat more primitive, uncultured, and awkward.”

He said, “Dreams are the main source of all of our knowledge about symbolism.” This means that the messages you receive from your dreams are expressed symbolically and must be interpreted to find their true meanings.

Jung says that rarely do the symbols in dreams have just one meaning. And when interpreting the messages in your dreams, he suggests going with your first hunch, relying on your intuitive abilities, before applying morerational methods of dream interpretation.

Perhaps one of the most fascinating dream theorists might be Edgar Cayce. Today, we would call him a psychic. When he was alive, he was a fascinating individual who, it appeared, could speak with the dead, make predictions about the future, and provide insight into areas where the normal person couldn’t go.... Dreampedia

CATEGORIES OF DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Gnffith, Miyago and Tago give 34 types of dream themes, from falling to being hung by the neck.

For the lay dreamer it is more useful to put dreams into much broader categories such as psychological. ESP, body, sexual, spiritual and problem solving. In researching the data for this book, some special cluster of dream themes were no­ticed.

For instance a cluster was noted in women past middle age, they dreamt of walking in a town and losing their hus­band. Description of these clusters can be seen in son and husband under family; losing teeth under body; flying; secret room under house; dead people; individuation. See also dream as meeting place; dream as spiritual guide; dream as therapist and healer; sex in dreams; ESP in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

CHILDHOOD DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

The following dreams are typical of childhood and mirror the stresses, experiences and questions associated with this stage in life. It is possible, however, to have one of these dreams at any stage in your life. See also STAGES OF LIFE.... The Element Encyclopedia

CHILDHOOD DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Research has shown that sensitive or gifted children tend to be more prone to dreams and nightmares. Dreams in childhood often mirror the stress and confusion that is associated with the early years of our lives. Frightening dreams or nightmares are common to children up to the age of around eight.

If you are a concerned parent, simply talking about the dream with your child can help dissipate the tension around them. Avoid the instinct to tell the child that it was just a dream and that dreams aren’t real, as this may discourage your child from confiding in you, or simply frustrate them because you don’t take it seriously. You may also have a child who dreams with their eyes open for a few seconds after the dream is over and they are awake. In general, such experiences are not signs of a disorder, but if you are concerned, talk to your doctor or a pediatrician.... The Element Encyclopedia

COLD, HAVING A

Little Giant Encyclopedia

You are in need of warmth. Or you have “had it” and want to tell everybody to “get lost.” You are living too isolated a life, as in Ice.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

COMMON TRAVELING DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Traveling dreams can be incredibly insightful because they show you what is keeping you from getting what you want in life. Always take note of the mode of transportation used and whether the vehicle is designed for one person or many as these will say something about the approach you are using to handle a certain situation.

Perhaps the most common of all traveling dream is the one in which you miss your plane, boat or train. No matter how frustrating this dream is, it is actually trying to help you get what you want. Look closely at what you should have done in the dream to make your connection; if there is clearly something you could have done differently to ensure you were on time, your dream is encouraging a shift of emphasis, understanding or action in waking life.

Another common dream is taking the wrong bus, train or plane.

This dream is particularly common to people who have problems making decisions in life because they are worried about what other people think. Your dreaming mind is urging you to correct this tendency by focusing on what you think is right. Yet another common dream involves being on board a boat, ship or plane and the person in charge becomes unable to pilot or steer. You are suddenly called upon to steer. This dream suggests that you are about to be thrust into a position of authority and that others are relying on you. For dreams of crashes or disasters whilst traveling, see also DISASTERS.

Dreams of traveling to a safe harbor or haven highlight the need for comfort and security in waking life. Remember that the trials, frustrations and challenges that you face in the dream symbolize real- life impediments and emotions that are slowing you down or helping you along your way. When interpreting traveling dreams, always consider the reactions and solutions that the dream calls upon you to make to improve your dream journey. The necessary ingredient to encourage your progress is often a symbolic representation for the action or position in waking life that will be most beneficial to you.... The Element Encyclopedia

COMPENSATORY WISH-FULFILLMENT DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

If your life is particularly difficult, you may have a dream in which you feel blissfully carefree and happy.

If you are feeling lonely and unloved, you may have a dream in which you are making love. Many dream analysts describe these night-time idylls as wish-fulfillment compensatory dreams. In classic Freudian theory, dreams are thought to be vehicles for wish-fulfillment. In dreams, the dreamer can develop and satisfy complex wishes and desires that would not be allowed to seep through to consciousness in waking life. Although this theory can be quite complicated, put simply it suggests that dreams reflect your unconscious desires. For example, if you are having financial problems, you may dream of winning the lottery.

If you are worn out after weeks of hard work, you may dream of sunning yourself on a beach without a care in the world.

If you are worried about the way you look, you may dream of being a supermodel.

Bear in mind, though, that compensatory wish-fulfillment is just one explanation for uplifting dreams; the meaning of your dream will always remain personal to you. However much a dream may appear to be wish-fulfillment, it is still important to consider its many layers of meaning. Jung’s theories about alchemy may also help you understand feelings of both intense joy and of sadness in your dreams.

In his classic 1944 text Psychology and Alchemy, Jung concluded that the ancient tradition of alchemy could help us make sense of a universally valid truth—that one becomes aware of new meanings within the unconscious by seeing them mirrored in the world around us. This is the psychological phenomenon of projection—the placing of unknown and unfulfilled desires onto other people and things—a process Jung believed was often at work in dreams.... The Element Encyclopedia

COMPUTERS AND DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Because of the ease with which computers can file, son, cross reference and present informa­tion, a great deal of work has been done in analysing the content of thousands of dreams (The Content Analysis oj Dreams, Hall and Van De Castle). As computers are an every­day pan of many homes, we can easily use them to gain insight into our own dreams. Two areas of help are as follows.

We can enter many dreams, then with a program such as Seeker or Masterfile, easily scan through them to see the fre­quency of dream themes. This approach to dreams—self in­sight through a series of dreams—is explained by Hall in The Meaning of Dreams. Important issues in our life and develop­ment occur as frequent dream themes, and are easily seen using a computer.

The program Brainstonn (Brainstorm Software Ltd) makes cross referencing dream symbols and associated comments easy. Using this program, if one dreamt of a tree and wrote one s associations, then six months later dreamt of a tree and entered this, the program instantly reminds you of the past reference to tree and can display it. Gradually a reference base of your own dreams and comments can be built up and quickly scanned. Such comparisons help to form a personality profile of yourself or others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

CONTROL DREAMS

My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are able to control the action in your dreams, indicates your growing confidence, high self-esteem and increasing skills. Alternatively, this type of dream may be a way of compensating for a waking situation in which you felt powerless.... My Dream Interpretation

COSMIC DREAMS

Little Giant Encyclopedia

When people of antiquity had dreams of strange cosmic events, like fire raining down from heaven, comets, etc., they would report them to the Areopagus in Athens or to the Senate in Rome. According to Jung, such dreams meant that the dreamer was being prepared for a position in government.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

CREATIVITY AND PROBLEM SOLVING IN DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Few dreams are, by themselves, problem solving or creative.

The few excep­tions are usually very clear. Example: ‘My mother-in-law died of cancer. I had watched the whole progression of her illness, and was very upset by her death. Shortly after she died the relatives gathered and began to sort through her belongings to share them out. That was the climax of my upset and distress, and I didn’t want any part of this sorting and taking her things. That night I dreamt I was in a room with all the relatives. They were sorting her things, and I felt my waking distress. Then my mother-in-law came into the room. She was very real and seemed happy. She said for me not to be upset as she didn’t at all mind her relatives taking her things. When I woke from the dream all the anxiety and upset had disap­peared. It never returned (told to author dunng a talk given to the Housewives Register in Ilfracombe).

Although in any collection of dreams such clearcut prob­lem solving is fairly rare, nevertheless the basic function in dreams appears to be problem solving.

The proof of this lies in research done in dream withdrawal. As explained in the entry science, sleep and dreams, subjects are woken up as they begin to dream, therefore denying them dreams. This quickly leads to disorientation and breakdown of normal functioning, showing that a lot of problem solving occurs in dreams, even though it may not be as obvious as in the exam­ple. This feature of dreaming can be enhanced to a marked degree by processing dreams and arriving at insights into the information they contain. This enables old problems to be cleared up and new information and attitudes to be brought into use more quickly. Through such active work one be­comes aware of the self, which Carl Jung describes as a cen­tre, but which we might think of as a synthesis of all our experience and being. Gaining insight and allowing the self entrance into our waking affairs, as M L. Von Franz says in Man and His Symbols, gradually produces a wider and more mature personality’ which emerges, and by degrees becomes effective and even visible to others’.

The function of dreams may well be described as an effort on the part of our life process to support, augment and help mature waking consciousness.

A study of dreams suggests that the creative forces which are behind the growth of our body are also inextricably connected with psychological develop­ment. In fact, when the process of physical growth stops, the psychological growth continues.

If this is thwarted in any way, it leads to frustration, physical tension and psychosomatic and eventually physical illness.

The integration of experience.

which dreams are always attempting, if successful cannot help but lead to personal growth. But it is often frozen by the individual avoiding the growing pains’, or the discomfon of breaking through old concepts and beliefs.

Where there is any attempt on the pan of our conscious personality to co-operate with this, the creative aspect of dreaming emerges. In fact anything we are deeply involved in, challenged by or attempting, we will dream about in a creative way. Not only have communities like the American Indians used dreams in this manner—to find better hunting, solve community problems, find a sense of personal life direction— but scientists, writers, designers and thousands of lay people have found very real information in dreams After all, through dreams we have personal use of the greatest computer ever produced in the history of the world—the human brain.

1- In Genesis 41, the story of Pharaoh’s dream is told—the seven fat cows and the seven thin cows. This dream was creative in that, with Joseph’s interpretation, it resolved a national problem where famine followed years of plenty. It may very well be an example of gathered information on the history of Egypt being in the mind of Pharaoh, and the dream putting it together in a problem solving way. See dream process as computer.

2- William Blake dreamt his dead brother showed him a new way of engraving copper. Blake used the method success­fully.

3- Otto Leowi dreamt of how to prove that nervous impulses were chemical rather than electncal. This led to his Nobel prize.

4- Friedrich Kekule tned for years to define the structure of benzene. He dreamt of a snake with its tail in its mouth, and woke to realise this explained the molecular forma­tion of the benzene ring. He was so impressed he urged colleagues, ‘Gentlemen, leam to dream.’

5- Hilprecht had an amazing dream of the connection be­tween two pieces of agate which enabled him to translate an ancient Babylonian inscription.

6- Elias Howe faced the problem of how to produce an effec­tive sewing machine.

The major difficulty was the needle. He dreamt of natives shaking spears with holes in their points. This led to the invention of the Singer sewing ma­chine.

7- Robert Louis Stevenson claims to have dreamt the plot of many of his stories.

8- Albert Einstein said that during adolescence he dreamt he was riding a sledge. It went faster and faster until it reached the speed of light.

The stars began to change into amazing patterns and colours, dazzling and beautiful. His meditation on that dream throughout the years led to the theory of relativity.

To approach our dreams in order to discover their creativity, first decide what problematic or creative aspect of your life needs ‘dream power’. Define what you have already leamt or know about the problem. Write it down, and from this clarify what it is you want more insight into.

If this breaks down into several issues, choose one at a time. Think about the issue and pursue it as much as you can while awake. Read about it, ask people’s opinions, gather information. This is all data for the dream process.

If the question still needs further insight, be­fore going to sleep imagine you are putting the question to your internal store of wisdom, computer, power centre, or whatever image feels right.

For some people an old being who is neither exclusively man nor woman is a working image.

In the morning note down whatever dream you remember. It does not matter if the dream does not appear to deal with the question; Elias Howe’s native spears were an outlandish image, but nevertheless contained the information he needed. Investigate the dream using the techniques given in the entry dream processing. Some problems take time to define, so use the process until there is a resolution.

If it is a major problem, it may take a year or so; after all, some resolutions need re­structuring of the personality, because the problem cannot disappear while we still have the same attitudes and fears. See secret of the universe dreams; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DEAD PEOPLE DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘My husband’s mother, no longer alive, came and slid her arms carefully under me and lifted me up. I shouted “Put me down! Put me down! I don’t want to go yet.” She carefully lowered me on to the bed and disappeared’ (EH). Most dreams in which dead people appear are expressive of our attempts to deal with our feelings, guilt or anger in connection with the person who died, or our own feelings about death. In the example the dreamer is feeling fear about being carried off by death.

When someone close to us dies we go through a period of change from relating to them as an external reality, to meeting and accepting them as alive in our memories and inner life. In the next example the man has not only come to terms with his mother’s and his own death, but also found this inner reality. Example: A dark grey sugar loaf form materialised. This pillar lightened in shade as I watched. It didn’t move. I began to think it was Mrs Molten who died in 1956.

The feeling grew stronger but still the colour lightened. Then it bent over and kissed my head. In that instant I knew it was my mother.

An ecstatic joy and happiness such as I have never known on earth suffused me. That happiness remained constantly in mind for the next few days’ (Mr M). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DEPRESSION AND DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

One hundred and forty dreams were collected from a group of patients suffering depression.

The same number of dreams were collected from people simi­lar in age and social background, but not suffering depression.

The dreams were given code numbers, mixed and given to an independent judge. He was asked to look for any evident themes of self punishment, such as ‘I was waiting for my friends all night but they never turned up’, ‘my fiance married somebody else’. Such self punishing themes were found to occur with greater frequency in the depressives’ dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DIFFERENT TYPES OF DREAMS

Dreampedia

“The interpretation of dreams is the real path to knowing the soul.”
SIGMUND FREUD

Clear and personalized messages Before jumping in to discover the hidden messages that filter into our dreams and appear in the dictionary in the second part, it’s best to keep in mind that not all oneiric thoughts can be analyzed with the same pattern. Therefore, psychologists and analysts distinguish between three classes of dreams:

  • Readjustment dreams
  • Satisfaction dreams
  • Premonitory dreams
In the interpretation of dreams, we work from the base knowledge that the same subject can have very different meanings depending on the circumstances and personal situation of the dreamer. Because of this, this dictionary offers abundant explanations (psychological and esoteric) from very distinct viewpoints, although the boundary is often blurred. This is meant to show the melting pot of possibilities for discovery and prediction if one atunes their sensitivity and perceptiveness in each interpretation. But back to this chapter, where we have compiled a series of recurring themes as examples, and touch on erotic dreams, another way in which the subconscious offers information to be analyzed. Although these belong in the group of satisfaction dreams, their details warrant a separate explanation. Readjustment dreams In this type of dream, the oneiric images are provoked by merely physical causes. Readjustment dreams can be of internal origins—that is, generated by the body due to factors such as indigestion or a headache—or of external origin—heat, noises, the feel of sheets on the body, etc. A typical example of a readjustment dream with external origin would be that of a person who, due to the weight of the blankets, dreams of carrying a heavy load. Where do these types of images come from? It’s simple: when we close our eyes, we have the sensation of being isolated from the world because our consciousness of the exterior world is so linked to visual perception. However, the other senses remain in contact with the world. Therefore, even though when we sleep we appear to lose consciousness, this information continues to be collected in the brain (this is why loud noises wake us up). This is why we prefer darkness and quiet to sleep. However, we can’t always control our surroundings. When situations arise out of our control (the sound of a siren, a change in temperature, etc.), these sensory impressions become integrated in our dreams and can take surprising forms. Abraham Lincoln, president of the United States, dreamt of his own death by assassination. Premonitory dreams
These oneiric episodes dream of something that will become reality in the future. In the majority of cases, these are negative dreams that tend to warn of a coming danger. As a paradigmatic example of premonition, take that of Abraham Lincoln, president of the United States, in 1865. A few days before being assassinated, Lincoln saw his own death in one of his dreams. Even though this mythical case of the US president indicates the opposite, let us be clear that dreaming of a death does not necessarily imply that a tragic event is imminent.

In these dreams, death can mean many different things; for example, some psychologists interpret it as marking the end of a life cycle. This is why we insist on the importance of personalizing the dream interpretation.

Be that as it may, premonitions tend to be hidden in a symbolism that is difficult to decode, since it does not refer to past experiences. They are messages that try to warn us of dangers that face us on the physical or emotional plane. For this reason, eastern cultures have always valued them highly, as we will see later on. Satisfaction dreams Satisfaction dreams constitute the basis for the main theories of oneiric interpretation. They deal with those images in which we fulfill the desires that we cannot satisfy while awake. Therefore, this huge category includes everything from erotic dreams to the worst nightmares. In some cases, a certain satisfaction dream may repeat for years. This means that the person’s subconscious is warning them of the importance of something they may be trying to ignore. The part of this book dedicated to interpretation refers to this type of dreams.

Sexual dreams are not necessarily the result of accumulated sexual tension that needs to be released, but rather they usually refer to inner conflicts and hidden needs, or a desire to enjoy sex more freely.
Sexual dreams There are dreams that have the capacity to excite us, intrigue us, make us tremble, embarrass us . . . These are the ones that we never, or almost never, share with others. These are erotic dreams that, generally speaking, have nothing to do with the social or sexual conduct of our waking lives.

“Dreams manifest the desires that our consciousness does not express.” Sigmund Freud

Erotic dreams join other sensations that, in waking life, we probably wouldn’t relate immediately with sex. Therefore, these dreams, which could be violent, passionate, perverse, romantic, etc., tend to refer to inner conflicts and hidden emotional needs. Therefore they belong to the classification of satisfaction dreams.

On some occasions, they reveal a fear of intimacy or warn against certain relationships. In others, they illustrate situations and behaviors that we cannot normally exhibit. The dream represents everything through symbols or a strong sexual connotation. Its themes and languages, often dark, can confuse us or make us doubt because each individual has their personal symbols (just like with other types of dreams). It’s interpretation, therefore, should be performed according to the situation of the individual.

Dreams are escape routes for sexual impulses that social conventions repress; in erotic dreams everything seems permissible, so they are the best way to bring our most secret emotional desires to light. For Sigmund Freud, dreams manifested the desires that our consciousness does not express, and that was all.

Dreams contain valuable information about ourselves. But their meaning is often far from what it seems.

On occasion, erotic dreams illustrate situations and behaviors that we can’t experience in real life, whether it is due to social convention or our own beliefs. These sexual dreams act as an escape route for repressed impulses.
Therefore, it’s important to pay attention to them because they contain valuable information about ourselves. However, their meaning is often far from what it seems. They may just as well symbolize tension in our daily lives as the desire to have a good time. Erotic dreams and fantasies Erotic dreams are also related to a person’s physical and emotional development. During puberty, for example, these kinds of dreams are very common. Others that are more unpleasant are related to episodes of abuse or sexual assault. In some form or another, almost everyone has had some type of erotic dreams because at the end of the day, they are natural occurrences that are part of our lives.

They deserve our time and attention. For example, it’s important to discover when they refer to sexual issues and when they refer to other aspects, because erotic dreams often bring us valuable clues about intimacy with a partner. If something is not right in the relationship, they probably indicate the path to resolution. There should not be any difference between the erotic dreams of men and women, just between different people. However, various studies done in the United States have demonstrated the opposite. While women usually have erotic dreams with someone they know and go all the way from flirting to coitus, men dream of anonymous kinky women that succumb to their fantasies. Obviously this is not always the case, but it is undeniable that a personal relationship is highly valued in the feminine psyche. The masculine, on the other hand, opts for pleasure and domination.

The education one has received, the latent sexism of the collective subconscious, and that of the media are all factors that dreams cannot bypass. These dreams can provoke even decisive, strong women to feel more vulnerable during dreams. Fortunately, as our customs are changing, the dissimilarities between masculine and feminine erotic dreams are gradually shrinking.

Finally, erotic dreams, like all dreams, can hide fears, anxieties, and needs that you repress due to inhibitive situations or a lack of time to face the problem. With the interpretation of erotic dreams, we can find many clues to understand our emotions better.

While men dream of anonymous kinky women succumbing to their fantasies, women usually dream of erotic encounters with men they know.
Dreams of duality: masculine-feminine
Dreams of duality are those that refer to our double identity: masculine and feminine. These dreams translate the union of our two elements: animus and anima, two notions defined by Jung that appear constantly in dreams. The majority of these oneiric episodes are characterized by the denial or rejection of one of the two parts of our being—and what each one represents—creating a tension or internal conflict that can even show through in our personality. In order to help us regain balance, the dream tries to make us understand how and why we’ve forgotten the other side of ourselves.

In this way, when a man dreams that he is a woman, the message is not necessarily about a conflict of identity or sexuality; more likely it refers to a lack of attention to the more sensitive, intuitive side of his personality. Equally, when a woman sees herself as a man in her dreams, her subconscious may be appealing to her more energetic and rational side.

Dreams in which the left (feminine) or right (masculine) side of our bodies are hurt or immobilized (for example, an arm or leg) warn us that we are repressing or denying our masculine or feminine development. It is difficult for us to accept our duality and we reject this aspect that we don’t know how to express. Dreams of houses
The great oneirologist of ancient times, Artemidorus of Ephesus (second century BC) said: “The home is us”; and the most recent research on oneiric content confirms it. Buildings in our dreams are a reflection of our personality. Therefore you must pay attention to all the details that appear, which give you reliable hints about your desires, fears, worries . . . Each place and element of the house refers to a personal aspect of the self; the kitchen represents our spiritual or intellectual appetite; the oven is the alchemic place of transformation; the basement represents the accumulation of riches; the bedroom, conjugal difficulties, etc.

However, dreams in which different rooms appear can also refer to different areas of real life. If, for example, you find yourself cooking in a kitchen, it may be a reference to a plan that you are “cooking up” in real life. If you find yourself locked in a dark basement, perhaps you feel guilty about something and think you deserve a punishment. Lying in a bed or on a sofa can be a sign that you need a break from your exhausting daily routine.

When the doors of the dream house are shut tight or covered with brick, or there are signs on doors to the rooms prohibiting entry, you should ask yourself what is blocking your evolution in real life. It may be part of your own personality or some basic inhibition.

The buildings in our dreams are a reflection of our personality. “The Splash” (David Hockney, 1966).
Many people dream that they discover new rooms in houses that they know well. In general, this points to unknown aspects of their personality that are about to come out; but it can also indicate that they are ready for a new intellectual challenge.

The feelings that emerge when we find ourselves inside an oneiric building are very significant. If you feel brave and curious while exploring every nook and cranny of the house, it means that you are not afraid of what you may discover about yourself, you act assuredly, and face your problems with confidence. On the other hand, if you feel afraid it is a sign of inhibition and insecurity.

A pleasant, organized room reflects mental order and spiritual serenity. If it doesn’t have windows, it is a sign of isolation, fear, and insecurity. “La habitacion” (“The Room”) (Van Gogh, 1889).
Nightmares and anxious dreams Nightmares are terrifying dreams that usually stay in our minds when we wake up. They usually occur during the REM phase and, on occasion, are so distressing that they wake you up and torment you for a few minutes. The fear is often accompanied by cold sweats, dry mouth, heart palpitations . . . and the sensation of having lived a terrible moment.

Sometimes, traumatic events that happen to us in waking life (an accident, a robbery, a sexual assault) revisit us in dreams. Our mind needs to free the tension caused by the event and it does it while our consciousness rests.

Worry dreams reflect subconscious doubts and fears about events in our lives that have been saved in our minds but not our conscious memory.
These dreams typically disappear with time. If they persist, it may be a major trauma that requires professional help or, at least, and understanding friend to listen; talking about it is the first step to overcoming it.

Many cultures share the belief that nightmares are nothing more than malignant spirits that attack their victims in their sleep with terrifying thoughts. Some research on oneiric content concludes that these scary dreams are more common in childhood, and if they persist into adulthood it usually indicates a deeply rooted problem.

Research in sleep laboratories has demonstrated that often nightmares are triggered by a sudden noise, which detonates a distressing oneiric image. Therefore, for people who suffer from frequent nightmares, it is advisable to wear earplugs. Worry dreams
Dreams in which we feel worried about something are more frequent than nightmares, and sometimes the pressure we feel to resolve a problem in the dream wakes us up. Once awake, the oneiric worry may seem trivial compared to our real problems, however we should not ignore the importance of these dreams; their analysis will reveal areas of our lives that require attention or make us insecure.

Worry dreams reflect subconscious doubts and fears about events in our lives that have been saved in our minds but not our conscious memory. They deal with minor preoccupations that we haven’t consciously given attention to, but our subconscious has recognized.

According to Freud, dreams that generate anxiety or worry are the result of trying to repress an emotion or desire, usually sexual. Freud also highlighted the importance of finding the source of that worry in waking life, since these worries left unattended can degenerate into worse traumas.

To analyze this type of dream you must pay attention to all the elements that appear in the episode, since it is symbolically giving you hints about what worries us.

Dreams about angels are usually messages of inner exploration. In some oneiric episodes they appear as spiritual guides and protectors that try to show us a path.
Dreams of inner exploration: forgotten babies and angels
Dreams in which forgotten babies or angels appear are very common, and meaningful for our personal and spiritual evolution. But what is the meaning of this baby that screams to be held and fed? It represents, symbolically, the spiritual seed inside of us that has been left to languish without nourishment. This sacred seed, the divine Self, the “philosophical child,” as the alchemists said. It has trusted us and we must help it grow.

Dreams about angels or spiritual entities tend to be messages of inner exploration. We see various examples collected in an “office of dreams.”

“I am in utter darkness. I am surrounded by silence and emptiness. Suddenly, a shape appears, white and slender, pure, almost surreal. The features of the face are erased. A pure oval, the svelte body, without a definable sex. There is only the impression of extreme sweetness and deep harmony; but this character causes me such an impression of abandonment that it seems like a cry for help. I wrap it in my arms and want to save it at all costs.”

This is a dream of protections, of contact with the invisible world. In this oneiric episode, the androgynous character is recognized as angelic. This fabulous vision is none other than the person’s angel showing him his ailment, found in the darkness.

In other dreams, angels appear as spiritual guides or personal guardians:

The cartoons of “Little Nemo” (Winsor McCay, 1905) always ended with the images of Nemo falling out of bed. His incredible stories revolved around his fascinating dreams.

“I had died on a golden carriage decorated with blue velvet; to my right, a feminine angel, all white, smiled at me . . . she held before me the reins of two white horses, while ahead of us, an unending path bathed in sunlight opened to us.” Travel dreams
One of the most pleasant and stimulating oneiric experiences is traveling to a far-off place and waking up with the sensation of having returned from a great vacation. Without a doubt, this often means a deep desire to travel that you have not been able to satisfy; but it can also hold other interesting readings.

On occasion, you remember precise details about places and settings you have never been to. This could be due to photographs, movies, or television reports that you’ve seen and that your subconscious has saved for some special reason.

These journeys coincide, sometimes, with moment in real life when we are about to begin something new (a change of job or location . . .). Just as the landscape and feelings of the dream can indicate our real emotions about this change, the circumstances of the trip are also revealing. If it is a bumpy trip in which it is difficult to get to your destination (because you lost the tickets or bags, or crashed the car . . .), the dream may be encouraging you to weigh the pros and cons of the situation, and warning you about obstacles ahead. Perhaps you are not mentally prepared for the change.

On the other hand, dreams about remote and exotic places are warning you that your lifestyle is claustrophobic and repressed, and that you need a change or to broaden your horizons.

The mode of transportation that you use to travel in the dream is very significant. If you travel in plane, for example, you should ask yourself if you have your feet firmly on the ground or, on the contrary, if you feel more comfortable “in the clouds.” Escapism in real life tends to appear symbolically in travel dreams. Trains are symbols of new and exciting opportunities; missing the train or letting it leave is a clear symbol of a fear of change—and the insecurity that goes along with this. The station, or point of departure, is a symbolic place of transformation. The predicament of not having a ticket or money to buy one is related to some type of deficiency. However, if you manage to arrive at the destination despite it all, the dream is reflecting a certain amount of self satisfaction.

Surrealism was a revolution. The world of the oneiric, the subconscious, the paranoid . . . become a new way of seeing and exploring life. Its influence is still seen today.... Dreampedia

DISTURBING DREAMS

Dreampedia

Disturbing dreams aren’t quite nightmares. They may cause you to wonder what exactly your sub-conscious is trying to tell you. First, the dreams could be unconscious advice. Maybe in some way you are betraying yourself, forgetting something, or not fulfilling a potential. For example, persons on the edge of a midlife career change may have dreams about being in school and searching for a missing classroom, or they may find themselves in a class about to take a final exam while realizing that they completely forgot to attend the class all year. Thus the feeling of panic in the dream points to the real feeling of panic in their current life about the failure of their present career. Second, the dreams could be an admonition, based in guilt. Imagine, for example, that you are embezzling the bank for which you work. Then you start having dreams about burglars breaking into your home. Well, the dreams are simply a depiction of something happening to you that is similar to the hurt or moral injury you are inflicting on someone else. This same dynamic often occurs in children’s nightmares: in waking life, children often experience angry feelings toward their parents and yet lack the cognitive capacity to express these feelings openly; so, in unconscious guilt, the anger becomes turned against themselves as threatening nightmare images. Third, the dreams could be hints of a repressed trauma. As I say above, nightmares often accompany the emotional pain of a traumatic event experienced in adulthood. But if a trauma in childhood is repressed, dreams reflecting the emotional intensity of the trauma can persist throughout life—as a repetition compulsion—until the trauma is eventually brought to conscious awareness and healed. Finally, the dreams could be psychic premonitions. This is a rare phenomenon, but it does happen to some persons. The best advice we’ve found about disturbing dreams is to just ignore them. You can try to analyze the images you find, but that is most likely not going to give you the answers you need.... Dreampedia

DO YOUR DREAMS HAVE A MEANING?

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

DO YOUR DREAMS MEAN ANYTHING?

About Dream Interpretation

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter.

The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us.

A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general.

In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2]

As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction.

The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated.

To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject.

But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature - for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked.

In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds:

I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it!

And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes:

Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

DREAM INTERPRETATION AND RECORDING DREAMS

Dreampedia

Dreams may come in almost any form and use any symbol or story line imaginable. Recognizing the feeling level in the dream as well as the particular symbols is important to understanding its meaning.

First, write down the dream as fully as you can. Second, write down all the symbols you can identify and the possible meaning beside them. Look them up; check an unabridged dictionary if necessary. Third, write out your interpretation. The following is a sample dream and its interpretation:

Step 1
The Dream

A woman was on a bus with a spiritual leader and members of a spiritual group. A man got on the bus wearing a dark coat and hat. He started robbing everyone. The woman had $600 in her wallet. She was lying in a sleeping bag. She wanted to hide her wallet but her left hand was asleep and she could not move.

Step 2
Recording dream symbols:

  • woman - feminine, creative part of self bus - large vehicle for growth
  • spiritual leader - her own higher self, spiritual teacher
  • spiritual group - growth conscious parts of self
  • man - masculine, assertive, strong part of self
  • dark - the unknown
  • coat - cover, hiding
  • hat - role she plays
  • robbing - stealing energy
  • $600 - 6 is your guidance, higher teachers, White Brotherhood (teachers of light); pay attention wallet - identity
  • sleeping bag - in a cocoon, hiding in a womb left hand - receiving hand asleep - numb, passive, not allowing others to give to her.

Step 3
Interpretation

The feminine part of the woman has a large capacity for growth. Many parts of herself are growth conscious and she is with or being led by her higher self. She has covered up or suppressed the strong, assertive part of herself. It is unknown to her. She allows people to take her energy without ever saying no. She gives her power away. The 6 is her guidance saying: look what you are doing. Be assertive!

She is afraid of losing her identity by being assertive and she is unable to do anything about it zipped up in her cocoon. She is unable to receive and allow others to give back to her. All her energy is going out, not returning. Her inability to receive is the main message of the dream.

Levels of Interpretation
A dream can be seen on many levels. There is a literal meaning which is usually not the correct interpretation. But it depends upon what you ask for.

For example, a woman asked that she be given insight on her marriage. She had tried many things to improve the situation, suggesting counseling, communication, and so on. In her dream she was shown herself and her husband in a desert, walking up to a trader selling phony wedding bands made out of tin. When she looked at her husband, his face was in a haze, distant. When they rode out of the desert and stopped at a little house for refreshment, she was greeted by a stranger who embraced her with a warmth and love that she immediately knew was missing in the relationship with her husband.

This dream could be interpreted that her masculine and feminine parts of self were not balanced, but she had asked specifically about the relationship. In this case the woman was working on balance within. As much as she did not want to hear it, she realized the relationship was not based on mutual love. It was not really a marriage, and no growth (desert) symbolized its present state. The series of dreams which followed indicated the same thing. She knew then that she had to leave.

This was a positive solution to the problem. Although some of the answers we receive may not be what we want to hear, they are always for our highest good. As soon as the woman was out of the relationship, she wondered what took her so long to see the situation and get on with her life.... Dreampedia

DREAMS

Dreampedia

Search Your Dreams in Full Detail

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We hope you find what you are looking.

Dream Interpretation & an A to Z dictionary of symbols and their meanings helps you make sense of your dreams and harness them to increase your creativity, solve problems, find life purpose, and obtain accurate personal guidance.

A to Z Dream Dictionary and Dream Interpretation will help you become an expert dream interpreter.

“Learn the meaning of your dreams and understand your vision for the future”
”a dream is never just a dream”

The Dream Interpretation Dictionary: Symbols, Signs and Meanings brings a deep and rich understanding to a variety of images, signs, and symbols.

With our site learning more about dreams and dream interpretation, you will come to recognize the different types of dreams and be able to understand what is causing them without ascribing the wrong meaning to them.... Dreampedia

DREAMS AND ANCIENT

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Greece Antiphon, a Greek living in the fourth century bc. wrote the first known descriptive book of dreams. It was designed to be used for practical and profes­sional interpretations. He maintained that dreams are not cre­ated by supernatural powers but natural conditions. In the second century ad a similar book was written by Anemidorus, a Greek physician who lived in Rome. He claimed to have gathered his infonnation from ancient sources, possibly from the Egyptian dream book dating from the second millennium bc. He may have used works from the Assurbanipal library, later destroyed, which held one of the most complete collec­tions of dream literature. Anemidorus classified dreams into dreams, visions, oracles, fantasies and apparitions. He identi­fied two classes of dreams: the somnium, which forecast events; and the insomnium, which are concerned with present matters.

For the somnium dreams Anemidorus gave a dream dictionary.

For example, he said abyss meant an impending danger, a dream of warning, and to see a candle being lighted forecasts a binh, to exhibit a lighted candle augers content­ment and prosperity, a dimly burning candle shows sickness, sadness and delay. This last interpretation is taken from folk­lore of the times and, because dreams tend to use commonly used verbal images, was probably true. He maintained that a person’s name—that is their identity, and the family, national and social background from which they arose—has a bearing on what their dream means.

Plato (429-347 bc) said that even good men dream of un­controlled and violent actions, including sexual aggression. These actions are not committed by good men while awake, but criminals act them out without guilt. Democritus said that dreams are not products of an ethereal soul, but of visual impressions which influence our imagination. Aristotle (383— 322 bc) stated that dreams can predict future events. Earlier Hippocrates, the ‘father of medicine’, discovered that dreams can reveal the onset of organic illness. Such dreams, he said, can be seen as illogically representing external reality.

Hippocrates was born on the island of Kos. On the island was the famous temple dedicated to Aesculapius, the god of medicine. There were about 300 such temples in Greece alone, dedicated to healing through the use of dreams. Hip­pocrates was an Aesculapian, and learnt his form of dream interpretation from them. In such temples the patient would ritually have to cleanse themselves by washing, and abstain from sex, alcohol and even food. They would then be led into what was sometimes a subterranean room with harmless snakes in—these were the symbol of the god. In the morning the patients were asked their dream, and it was expected they would dream an answer to their illness or problem. There are many attestations to the efficacy of this technique from pa­tients. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DREAMS AND SELF-KNOWLEDGE

Dreampedia

Dreams help you see yourself as you are: your true inner beauty, your potential, where you are both missing and getting the point of lessons you are working on. Nothing is more important than to know yourself. This makes all things on all planes in all realities easy. My channel has explained, "You do not have to suffer to grow. This is not what God intended, not His concept at all. It should be delightful to learn to know yourself. You are all going to make mistakes, and some things will seem awkward and uncomfortable at first. But if you can go out as children with eagerness and curiosity for learning, you will begin to understand what a wonderful adventure living really is. "Nothing is unchangeable. When you dream of a particular problem or situation in your life, remember it is given to you in order that you may creatively resolve and move beyond it. "The most difficult program to break is viewing change as something frightening, difficult, painful, or a lot of hard work. If you want to make life hard on yourself, this is your choice. God is patient. There is an eternity to learn that living is joyous and effortless. You create your life daily. You can choose to change it at any time. When you tire of running from lessons, you can make joyful progress very quickly. "The key thing is to have the eyes to see and the ears to hear. Some people have this when they incarnate, others take longer to develop it. This is the ability to sort out truths from all teachings, experiences and people around you. Lessons are being presented to you constantly, whether through your own or someone else's life. You can learn a great deal by watching other people interacting with one another. Watch and observe, but do not judge. This is the key with both self and others."... Dreampedia

DREAMS AND THE GRIEVING PROCESS

The Element Encyclopedia

Dreams that focus on the early stages of mourning after the loss of a loved one are often dreams in which the dead person is still alive and well, and continuing to participate in your life. You may, for example, dream of having breakfast with them or taking a walk in the park, just the same as you did when they were alive. The reason for this is that your dreaming mind has not yet accepted the person’s absence from your life. This is a natural and healthy type of dream to have in the first phase of mourning as it allows your dreaming mind to escape the pain of reality. Some dream analysts describe such dreams not as denial, but as a catalogue of all the memories the survivor has of that person.

You may well find that feelings of hostility or anger feature in these dreams because, along with deep feelings of sadness, there are also feelings of fury that the person you cared about has left you. You may have dreams that express how guilty you feel; for example, you may dream that you are once again tending your sick relative but your attention is focused elsewhere and you can’t make them feel comfortable; similarly, you may dream that you become sick yourself or try to prevent the death happening.

At some point, however, your dreams will begin to reflect the grief and awareness that your loved one has died. Perhaps you dream you are at a restaurant and suddenly realize you need to eat alone because your partner isn’t delayed. Such dreams are often characterized by deep sadness and tears, and it is quite normal to feel depressed after having one of these. You may find yourself revisiting earlier stages of your grief again at this time, and it is very common for dead people to come into dreams to let us know it is time to stop mourning. Even if your spiritual beliefs lead you to believe that the person who has died is still with you, you still need to go through the grieving and healing process, acknowledging all the good and bad feelings you had about this person and what their death means to you. Dreams can help you with this process and experts believe it typically takes around two years to fully pass through all the stages of grief.

But what if you are still having vivid and emotional dreams of a departed loved one ten years after their death? It’s possible that you are still holding onto feelings of love and anger. Perhaps you are stuck with your grief or are simply unable to process it. For example, you may dream that a loved one keeps turning up and shouting at you.

If you have always been taught that showing emotion is a sign of weakness, then such a harmful and narrow stereotype is interfering with the natural processes of grief. Your dreaming mind will therefore highlight the issues that are stopping you completing the grieving process and moving forward with your life.

If you find yourself unable to resolve ‘unfinished business’ and move beyond feeling stuck in the grief process, consulting a therapist could be helpful.

Bear in mind that that for which you mourn may not be solely your family, friends and pets. You grieve for what you have lost and your dreams may express your sense of loss concerning important objects, such as a home; important relationships, such as the end of a marriage; important projects, such as losing a job you loved; important dreams for the future, such as the loss of a baby due to a failed IVF attempt or miscarriage; and important feelings, such as the loss of trust if you have been the victim of a violent crime. Make note of whom or what you are mourning and try to ascertain which stage of grief you are in. Do your dreams reflect this and do they give you a suggestion for how far you might begin to accept the loss?... The Element Encyclopedia

DREAMS DON’T COME TRUE, DO THEY?

The Element Encyclopedia

You may have dreams that appear to predict the future. Whilst many of these dreams can be easily explained, there are a few that seem impossible to explain and which might therefore be genuinely supernatural. During some periods of its history, the Christian Church regarded dreams as a way in which God showed his chosen people the future: St Augustine, for example, ‘saw’ his conversion in a dream ten years before it took place. The Bible itself is packed with predictive dreams and, as late as the sixteenth century, bishops would take careful note of their dreams to predict events.

Although there is some evidence that dreams may be able to reveal the future or events, they are perhaps best explained by anticipating what is likely to happen. For example, many dreams predicted the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. However, it must be remembered that President Kennedy was one of the world’s most well-known men and presidents are always vulnerable to assassination. Such dreams, as Jung put it, ‘are not more prophetic than a medical diagnosis or weather forecast. They are merely an anticipatory combination of possibilities which may coincide with the actual behavior of things but need not necessarily agree on every detail.’ Dreams of personal disaster are usually a common cause for concern; for example, a plane crash or car crash. However, such dreams are typically born out of apprehension.

Even though there is no scientific evidence that dreams can reveal the future, some dreams do seem to be genuine predictions. Just before his title fight in 1947, Sugar Ray Robinson dreamt he was in the ring with Jimmy Doyle. ‘I hit him a few good punches and he was on his back, his bland eyes staring up at me. Doyle never moved and the crowd was shouting, “He’s dead! He’s dead!”’ Robinson was so upset by the dream he asked Adkins, his trainer and promoter, to call off the fight. Adkins told him: ‘Dreams don’t come true.

If they did, I’d be a millionaire.’ In the eighth round, Doyle went down from a hook to the jaw. He never got up and was dead the next day.

If you are interested in this aspect of dreaming—whether you yourself have had predictive dreams or simply want to study the subject—it is vital to keep a detailed diary of your dreams.

If you do have a dream that seems to predict a serious event or important event, such as an explosion or a tornado, make a note, have it dated and witnessed, seal it in an envelope and send it to a reputable institution such as your bank with instructions to date it on arrival. See also Precognitive dreams entry in DISASTERS.... The Element Encyclopedia

DREAMS IN ARABIC CULTURE

The Dream Encyclopedia

Dreams have many meanings in Arabic culture. According to some, sleep is a preoccupation of the soul, which detaches itself from external things and experiences events taking place in its interior. During sleep the interior self “absorbs” the five senses, which then cease to perceive and turn back to the mind. According to other views, the soul can perceive the form of things by the senses and by thought, independently of their objective reality. Thought does not fall asleep when the faculty of perceiving sleeps, and during the night images continue to exist as if they could be sensed. Their form is outlined in the soul, and they are presented to the mind of the dreamer in the same way as in the waking state.

It is believed that the soul, when it is freed from the physical limits of the body, can float at ease over everything that it desires to possess, whereas in the waking state it cannot. When dreamers awaken, they still preserve the memory of these fantastic pictures. If the dreamer has a blemished soul, the dreamer is continually deluded by dreams, whereas the dreamer is unde- ceived when the soul is pure.

Traditional Arab belief also holds that dreams are generated by the fundamental humors of the human body, and that individuals dream accord- ing to their temperaments. Certain Arabs com- pletely separate the faculty of perception from the visible body and believe that individuals, when asleep, can leave their bodies and contem- plate the world with a lucidity proportional to their purity, a notion supported by various verses of the Qur’an. ... The Dream Encyclopedia

DREAMS THAT FORETELL ACCIDENTS

The Element Encyclopedia

A number of well-recorded dreams have appeared to foretell accidents and some researchers believe that accidents in dreams are a warning. Research, however, does not support the idea that dreams predict impending disaster. See also DISASTERS.

The story of the SS Titanic is well known. On 14 April 1912, the Titanic struck an iceberg and sunk in the North Atlantic, carrying with her more than 1500 lives. The lack of sufficient lifeboats has often been blamed as the leading cause of fatalities; experts will tell you, however, that there were hundreds of causes leading to the accident, including everything from faulty construction of watertight compartments to a failure to pay attention to numerous warnings of icebergs in the area. What is important here, however, is the huge number of accident dreams that foretold this disaster.

Immediately after the Titanic sank in the North Atlantic, there were at least two dozen reports of people who cancelled their trip because of precognitive dreams they had about the sinking. No one knows how many had the same warning and ignored it, going to a death they could have avoided. There is one businessman that had the same precognitive dream of the Titanic sinking three times and chose to ignore the warning. He still intended to make the trip, until a sudden turn in business forced him to cancel.... The Element Encyclopedia

EDGAR CAYCE ON DREAMS

Dreampedia

Cayce was able to obtain virtually an unlimited amount of knowledge on an unlimited number of subjects. One of these subjects was dreams and dream interpretation. Cayce was able to astound people by interpreting their dreams and giving them insight into their psyche, lives and even past lives. Cayce revealed that dreams are actually journeys into the spirit world.

Edgar Cayce once said, “Dreams, visions, impressions, to the entity in the normal sleeping state are the presentations of the experiences necessary for the development, if the entity would apply them in the physical life. These may be taken as warnings, as advice, as conditions to be met, conditions to be viewed in a way and manner as lessons, as truths, as they are presented in the various ways and manners.”

Cayce believed that our dreams serve several functions. Somatic dreams - dreams referring to the body - are extremely important to be mindful of. Very often dreams will offer solutions to health problems. For example, one man was plagued with food allergies for many years, but was unable to find the source of his discomfort. Then one night he went to bed and he dreamed of a can of coffee. He quit drinking coffee and his symptoms disappeared.

Cayce also believed that deceased friends and family members do occasionally visit us in our dream state. These occurrences may offer direct communication with those people or allow us to resolve our feelings about their death. The person may also represent some aspect of themselves.

During the dreaming state of sleep, we experience the different levels of consciousness and receive input from the different realms of the spirit world. Through dreaming, we have special access to our spirit within. According to the Cayce readings, there is not a question we can ask which cannot be answered from the depths of our inner consciousness when the proper attunement is made.

A dream may be of a physical, mental, or spiritual nature and may deal with all manner of psychic manifestations. These include telepathy, clairvoyance, prophetic visions, out of body traveling, remembrance of past lives, communication with beings in other realms including deceased friends and relatives, spirit guides, angels, Christ, and even the voice of God. Dreams can also give invaluable information on the status of the body.

Cayce felt that there is no dimension of human life, whether social, financial, emotional or physical, mental or spiritual with which the dream may not on occasion deal. Dreams may encourage or reprimand, instruct or deceive, inspire or seduce, guide or confuse.

The potential for an immense array of experiences in consciousness is always there. What we actually receive depends upon our attitudes, motivations, the measure of our attunement, and the extent to which we have made applicable what was received in earlier dreams and in waking experiences.

The dream world is a strange yet fascinating place! There are several different kinds of dreams. Let’s look at those in our next section.... Dreampedia

EROTIC DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

See sex in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

FAMOUS DREAMS

Dreampedia

Through the centuries, the dreaming mind has been credited with being the source of ideas, insights, revelations and guidance, some of which have changed the course of history. Here are just a few well- known examples:

Julius Caesar’s decision to cross the Rubicon is attributed to a dream in which he saw himself in bed with his mother (Mother Rome, the seers told him). His assassination was foretold in his wife’s Calpurnia’s dream. ‘She held him in her arms, bleeding and stabbed.’ Another Caesar, Caesar Augustus, is said to have walked the streets as a beggar because of instructions he received in a dream.

St Francis of Assisi founded the Franciscan Order because of a dream in which Jesus Christ spoke from the cross, telling him to ‘go set my house in order’.

Dante relates that the whole story of The Divine Comedy was revealed to him in a dream on Good Friday in 1300. When he died in 1321, part of the manuscript was lost. His son Jocojso found the manuscript after a dream in which his father showed him where to look.

Genghis Khan is reported to have received his battle plans from his dreams. He is also reported to have been told in a dream that he was a chosen one.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s famous poem, ‘Kubla Khan’, was written upon awakening from an opium-affected dream.

Robert Louis Stephenson believed that his best stories came from his dreams. He reported that the theme for Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde was derived from a dream. He also reported other breakthroughs in his writing that came from his dreams. He suffered as a child from nightmares and learned to control his dreams to change the nightmares. He said he used his dreams to revise plays and stories while asleep.

Abraham Lincoln dreamt, days before his assassination, of great cries coming from the East Wing of the White House. When he investigated, he was told by soldiers on guard that they weeping for the president who had been assassinated. Days later, his body was held in state in the East Wing so people could pay their last respects.

Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz was a chemist working on the chemical structure of benzene. He reported that he got fed up with his data, which made no sense interpreted as a ‘long string’ molecule. He was dozing in his comfy chair when he was startled by the image of a snake biting its own tail. He woke and worked out the mathematics of the benzene molecule as a ring rather than a long string.

Guiseppe Tartini (Italian violinist and composer) composed one of his greatest works, ‘The Devil’s Trill’, as a result of a dream he had in 1713. In the dream, he handed his violin to the devil himself, who began to ‘play with consummate skill a sonata of such exquisite beauty as surpassed the boldest flights of my imagination. I felt enraptured, transported, enchanted; my breath was taken away, and I awoke. Seizing my violin I tried to retain the sounds I had heard. But it was in vain. The piece I then composed...was the best I ever wrote, but how far below the one I heard in my dream!’

Elias Howe, the inventor of the sewing machine, wrote that he got the core idea, the breakthrough concept, from a dream. It was a nightmare. He had been captured by cannibals. They were preparing to cook him and they were dancing around the fire waving their spears. Howe noticed at the head of each spear there was a small hole through the shaft, and the up and down motion of the spears and the hole remained with him when he woke. The idea of passing the thread through the needle close to the point, not at the other end, was a major innovation in making mechanical sewing possible.

Niels Bohr reported that he developed the model of the atom based on a dream of sitting on the sun with all the planets hissing around on tiny cords.

Paul McCartney heard a haunting melody in one of his dreams, confirmed that none of the Beatles had heard it before, and wrote it down. It became the tune for the famous song, ‘Yesterday’.... Dreampedia

FEATURES OF HANDWRITING IN DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Professional graphologists can recognize several hundred handwriting features which they believe reveal aspects of a person’s character.

Here are some basic handwriting features that may help you interpret the message hidden in the handwriting in your dream:... The Element Encyclopedia

FORGETFULNESS OF DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

See science, sleep and dreams, fortress See house, buildings. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

FUNCTIONS OF DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Over the years many theories to ex­plain the ‘why’ of dreams have been put forward. These range from dreams being messages from spirits; being results of food eaten prior to sleep; the mind freewheeling nonsensi­cally; the garbage disposal system of the mind; suggestions from waking experience; a computer reprogramming for the brain; to Freud’s wish fulfilment and Jung’s compensation theory.

If we do not argue any particular theory, however, then perhaps we see dreams as having a much wider function.

The most primal drives observable are survival, growth and repro­duction. Other urges, such as eating, social position, curiosity, are secondary.

The human animal appears to have survived and reproduced more capably after the development of self awareness, language and reasoning. With or without these, we remain an animal with a psychobiological nature. All ani­mals are known to dream. All animals share a certain situa­tion. They have an internal world out of which arises im­pulses (to eat, to mate, to avoid danger) and feeling reactions (anger, fear, anticipation). And they have an external world which confronts them with real survival dangers, sources of food, a mate, changes in environmental conditions.

A dream lies somewhere between these two worlds.

We can think of the human personality as being like a special son of cavity into which all these influences are dropped or are thrown. Physical sensations, internal drives and emotions, language, social rules, religious ideas; prompts to make decisions; news of war, massive media and advertis­ing information, are all dropped in.

The cavity has to deal with it, but as it is a mixture of things, many of which are in opposition, some sort of balance has to be kept. But how? And it cannot be simply a matter of throwing out all of one sort or aspect of things. Eradicating the memory of criticism might make us more calm, but it would limit the process of psychological growth, which has survival value.

Dreams can be seen to be connected with our survival and self regulating process. Because this involves all aspects of oneself and one’s experience, one cannot give dreams a single definition. They probably have many secondary functions, such as an interface to balance the internal and external influ­ences, to compensate between the inner needs and outer real­ity—a baby may miss its feed so, to cope with this primal need, it may dream of being fed. Traumatic or exterior danger­ous events, which cannot be processed immediately, can be stored and dealt with (experimented with or abreacted) while asleep. In higher mammals, infant traumas can be stored and dealt with in sleep when, or if, a stronger ego develops.

To meet the loneliness and isolation of consciousness’ or fears of death, the dream can link the waking self with its unconscious sense of unity or God.

To meet survival needs of primitive human beings prior to rational thought, the dream probably acted as a computer, synthesising experience and information, giving rise to creative solutions to hunting or social situations, presented as sleeping or waking imagery. This may explain why many pnmitive people say skills such as farming, weav­ing, writing, were told them by a vision of a god or goddess.

If we realise that the dream is an end product of a process which produces it, it enables us to see that the process’ (the survival function which regulates, compensates, links, prob­lem solves) can be accessed without meeting the dream. See sleep movements; dream process as computer; Adler; Freud; Jung. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

GOOD AND EVIL PEOPLE IN DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Now and again your dreaming mind may conjure up powerful images of notoriously evil people to warn you against the destructive effects of negative forces in yourself, or in some aspect of your waking life. These people embody the classic shadow or villain archetype. Similarly, your dreaming mind may come up with images of people celebrated for their incredible compassion and goodness; your unconscious may have chosen such people to inspire and encourage you to find healing within, or to reach out to others with compassion. Such images are typically archetypal symbols of the teacher and healer.

The following list is merely a starting point, being far from comprehensive, but if any of these well-known figures appear in your dreams, try to find out why. They are such vivid and colorful examples of the potential power of good or evil in waking life that their appearance in dreamland should be taken extremely seriously as a powerful message from your unconscious.... The Element Encyclopedia

HEALING DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

There is a long tradition of dreams being a resource for physical and psychological healing. The ancient Greek god Aesculapius was believed to come to people in their sleep to offer healing through their dreams. The sick and wounded would travel from far away places to sleep in the temple of Aesculapius to let the healer enter their dreams and heal them. The Greek philosopher Aristotle believed that premonitory dreams of sickness could be caused by the dreamer’s unconscious recognition of the symptoms. He postulated that dreams may be premonitions of an illness coming from within the body, where some ’unconscious’ mind recognized early symptoms that had not yet come to the attention of the ’waking self’. The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy and one of the earliest recorded instances of such healing is the famous story in the Old Testament, when Joseph revealed the meaning of dreams to Pharaoh.

Sigmund Freud pioneered the use of dreams in therapy, bringing them to widespread attention, but many other approaches have been developed since then. The common feature for people who use dreams as therapeutic tools for physical and emotional healing is that dreams can empower them; they feel in touch with a powerful inner process that they believe is working actively for their own good.

Since time immemorial, people have created special places in which to sleep and dream. The dreaming chamber on the island of Malta is one example, but ancient dream temples can be found all over the world. These places were meant to ’incubate’ wise, deep dreams that would bring guidance and healing to the dreamer. Most of us do not have a dream temple located conveniently nearby; but the idea of receiving valuable, healing dreams is an appealing one, so here are four simple steps for creating a dream temple anywhere you like.

Find or create a special place for dreaming
For those of us fortunate enough to have more than enough rooms in our living space, the answer is simple: make one of those rooms— perhaps a guest room that is rarely used—into a dream place. Furnish it sparklingly, but make sure that the bed is comfortable. For the majority of us who don’t have a room to spare, we need to be a little bit more creative. Clear some space in a room in which you are comfortable and designate it as your dream place. All the time, keep in mind that you are preparing your sleeping space to facilitate your dreaming.

Prepare yourself
You are going to be welcoming dreams in a way that you don’t ordinarily do, so treat the experience as special from the outset. You might want to take a long bath. Make yourself comfortable. Eat lightly, if at all, for dinner. It’s probably best if you don’t consume alcohol or smoke the day before your dream incubation. As you go through your activities, keep in mind that you are preparing yourself to welcome dreams.

Focus on dreaming
Throughout your day, you are simply preparing yourself to be more receptive to dreams. Focus on dreaming.

If you have a particular issue in your life, you might tell yourself to ask for guidance in your dream.

Sweet dreams
This is not a one-shot exploration. Try it for a few days or even for a week—or for as long as you like. ... The Element Encyclopedia

HORSE HAVING A LONG OR SHORT TAIL

Islamic Dream Interpretation

A hose with a long tail means a person will have many followers while a horse with a short or cut tail means he will have less followers.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

HOW TO REMEMBER YOUR DREAMS

Dreampedia

When beginning the steps towards interpreting your dreams, many people find it helpful to keep a notebook – a dream journal, if you will – right next to your bed with a pen or pencil. As soon as you are physically able, begin your journal.

Write down your dream as soon as you remember it. Write down everything you remember, even if it doesn’t make sense. Most often, the parts that don’t make sense or are out of place are the most valuable. Every detail, even the minutest element in your dream is important and must be considered when analyzing your dreams. Look closely at the characters, animals, objects, places, emotions, and even color and numbers that are depicted in your dreams.

Ask yourself, “What does this remind me of?” Write down the first thing that comes to your mind. This will likely be the real situation in your life that is symbolized in the dream. What did that real-life situation make you feel like? If this is the same feeling represented in your dream, you’re on the right track. Often when there is more than one part to your dream (more than one story line) that usually means there are two things your subconscious is trying to tell you.

Remember that we have between four and seven dreams per night. If you wake up from a dream, write it down. Don’t roll over and go back to sleep. If you don’t write it down, you’ll never remember it in the morning! At the very least, you can jot down the basic premise of the dream and go back in the morning to fill in the rest of the details such as feelings, etc.

Suggest to yourself every night as you fall asleep, “I will remember my dreams.” Say this over and over. Your sub-conscious will act on this subtle suggestion. Practice keen observation in your dreams through self-suggestion prior to sleep. When a problem confronts you, you might want to ask by prayer for guidance to be sent to you through your dreams.

Trust your instincts! If something seems important, it probably is. Try not to let your logical side take over.

So you’ve got your dreams down on paper. Where do you go next? The next step would be interpretation.... Dreampedia

HOW TO REMEMBER YOUR DREAMS

Dreampedia

Many people are convinced that they do not dream. ‘My head hits the pillow and I’m out for the count’, they often say, ‘and when Iwake up in the morning, I cannot recall having had any dreams’. Scientific research, however, confirms that we all dream at regular intervals throughout the night.

Every 90 minutes or so your eyes move rapidly around under your closed eyelids. At the same time your brainwaves become highly active, almost as though you were awake. It’s during this period of what is known as ‘Rapid Eye Movement’ or ‘REM sleep’ that you dream. In the early part of the night, which is when sleep is deepest, the REM periods are quite short, lasting only a few minutes at most. Towards morning, as your sleep becomes lighter, the REM episodes become longer. The last dream you have just before waking up can last for as long as three-quarters of an hour.

During REM sleep, your body is immobilized. This means that if you have a nightmare where you try to run away or cry out, you feel para¬ lyzed. People who walk and talk in their sleep usually do so between periods of REM sleep when the body is once again able to move.

Although some people have a natural facility for remembering their dreams, particularly those with emotional, creative or introverted personalities, few can bring back the whole experience whilst others recall little or nothing. Accurate dream recall is not easy. You learn it, as you learn any skill, by developing an interest, maintaining your enthusiasm and following a routine.

If you have a stressful lifestyle, try not to watch television late in the evening. Instead, spend a few minutes relaxing quietly and letting go of the day’s concerns. If you find it hard to switch off, light reading can be helpful and alcohol and coffee late at night should be avoided. They

are known to inhibit dream recall, as can sleeping pills. Keep a pen and a notebook within easy reach of your bed. Leave this special notebook open and write down the date as a signal to your subconscious mind that you intend to remember a dream.

As you start drifting off into sleep, tell yourself: Tonight Ishall have a dream and remember it in the morning.’ When you wake up, lie still and keep your eyes closed. Allow your mind to stay relaxed, drifting back until you recapture a fragment of a dream. Even a single image is better than nothing. As soon as you remember anything, write it down, however trivial it seems. Make it a habit to write something - even a note of the mood you woke up in is better than nothing. It’s important to do this first thing, before you get out of bed. The simple act of changing your position in bed can be enough to make a dream disappear without trace. A loud alarm clock can have a similar effect. Do remember that no skill is acquired overnight. Be patient and persevere.... Dreampedia

HYPNOSIS AND DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Many experiments have been done using hypnosis in connection with dreams. In the early pan of this century Carl Schroetter hypnotised Miss E, a pharmacist, in an attempt to test Freud’s theory of symbol formation. He suggested Miss E would dream of having homosexual inter­course with a female friend, L.

The dream she subsequently reported was ‘1 sit in a small dirty cafe holding a tremendous French newspaper ...

A woman with a strong Yiddish ac­cent—L is Jewish—asks me twice, “Don’t you need any­thing?” I don’t answer . . . she comes a third time . . . I recognise her as my acquaintance. She holds a threadbare suitcase with a sticker on it that reads “For ladies only!” I leave the cafe with her . . . she hangs onto me which I find unpleasant but suffer it . . . Before her house she pulls out an enormous bunch of keys and gives one to me. “1 trust only you with it; it is the key to this case. You might like to use it. Just watch that my husband doesn’t get hold of it.” ‘ The dream contains several of the classical Freudian symbols of sex, such as the suitcase, the key and the phrase For ladies only’. Miss E had not, according to Schroetter, heard or read of Freud’s ideas.

Roffenstein, suspecting Miss E may have known something of Freudian ideas, chose ‘a 28-year-old, totally uneducated nursemaid of lower than average intelligence, who grew up and still lives in an uneducated milieu’. He suggested she dream of intercourse with her father. She reported: ‘I dreamt about my father, as if he had presented me with a great bag and with it he gave me a large key. It was a very large key. It looked like the key to a house. I had a sad feeling. I opened the bag. I snake jumped out against my mouth; I shrieked aloud.

More recent expenments are reponed by Woods and Greenhouse in New Wbrld of Dreams.

The suggestion was made to one subject that as a child she had wet the bed and her mother scolded her. That night she dreamt she fell into a pond in winter and her mother was angry.

An interesting aspect of these experiments is that another subject under hyp­nosis was told the dream and asked what it meant. Without hesitation she said. Oh, that girl must have wet the bed.’ This and other experiments suggest humans have an inherent, al­though perhaps unconscious, ability to understand the lan­guage of dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

IDENTITY AND DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

To have a sense of personal existence distinct from others may be unique to human beings, and in large measure due to the learning of language. Jung and Neumann’s studies of the historical development of identity suggest, in an evolutionary sense, that having an T is still a very newly acquired function. This makes it vulnerable.

It is also noticeably something which develops during childhood and reaches different levels of maturity during adulthood. Al­though it is our central experience, it remains an enigma—a will o’ the wisp, which loses itself in dreams and sleep, yet is so dominant and sure in waking.

In dreams, our sense of self—our ego, personality or iden­tity—is depicted by our own body, or sometimes simply by the sense of our own existence as an observer. In most dreams our T goes through a series of experiences, just as we do in waking life, seeing things through our physical eyes, touching with our hands, and so on. But occasionally we watch our own body and other people as if from a detached point of bodiless awareness.

If we accept that dreams portray in im­ages our conception of self, then dreams suggest that our identity largely depends upon having a body, its gender, health, quality, the social position we are bom into, and our relationship with others. In fact we know that if a person loses their legs, becomes paralysed, loses childbearing ability or is made redundant, they face an identity crisis. But the bodiless experience of self shows the human possibility of sensing self as having separate existence from the biological processes, one’s state of health and social standing. In its most naked form, the T may be simply a sense of its own existence, without body awareness.

Dreams also show our sense of self, either in the body or naked of it, as surrounded by a community of beings and objects separate from the dreamer, and frequently with a will of their own.

If we place the dreamer in the centre of a circle and put all their dream characters, animals and objects around them; and if we transformed these objects and beings into the things they depicted, such as sexuality, thinking, will emotions, intuition, social pressure, etc., we would see what a diverse mass of influences the ego stands in the middle of. It also becomes obvious that our T sees these things as outside itself in nearly all dreams. Even its own internal urges to love or make love may be shown as external creatures with which it has a multitude of ways to relate.

If we take the word psyche to mean our sense of self, then in our dreams we often see our psyche at war with the sources of its own existence, and trying to find its way through a most extraordinary adventure—the adventure of consciousness. One of the functions of dreams can therefore be thought to be that of aiding the survival of the psyche in facing the multitude of influences in life—and even in death.

See Individuation; dreamer. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

INDIA, INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS

DreamPedia

This dictionary of India, interpretation of dreams contains over 93 indexed entries.
Indian Interpretation of Dreams
... DreamPedia

INTEGRATION DREAMS

Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)... Strangest Dream Explanations

INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Although mind and body may be a total unity, and the separation in language merely a conve­nience, despite its unity our being has a number of interacting systems.

The action of the hean on the other systems is obvi­ous, and the influence of emotions on the organs is also be­coming obvious. What is not so well established is the impor­tance of the feedback occurring when we gain insight into our own functioning through understanding a dream. Although our being is already a self regulating system, the ability to turn consciousness inwards to make clear aspects of unconscious function appears to increase the efficiency of self regulation. This is shown in the first example of reptiles, lizards, snakes, where David finds a long-standing neck pain and goes through insight into its cause. In this way wc might be seen as a conscious organism which not only reprogrammes mental patterns or habits, but to some extent can renovate or change body efficiency as well. See dream analysis; dream process­ing; the Introduction. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS

DreamPedia

There are thousands of symbols, and it depends upon the context of one's own personal dream as to what they all mean for him / her. Look at it this way...a dream is like a puzzle, and although there are several pieces that are quickly pieced together because they are so obvious, the puzzle isn't complete until all the pieces are placed together bit by bit. Then you have the complete picture...until then, you-ll only have disjointed images that don't add up to anything coherent, and you'll still be confused..

Symbols in dream interpretation are just one piece of the puzzle. Each piece / symbol fits together and makes a complete picture. The entire dream tells the story, not just 1 or 2 symbols picked out of it, and each individual will have different nuances affecting the dream...such as daily influences perhaps integrating into the dream. For example: let's say you saw a movie yesterday about a vicious grizzly bear and it was frighteningly graphic, and then later that night you dreamt about a bear. This would be less meaningful than if you suddenly had a dream about a bear one night, without prior influences. That could be entirely different.

When interpreting dreams, the first thing everyone should consider is the typical universal meaning of the symbol / dream image. For instance, death symbolizes the end of something that's ready for change, and a new beginning. Most people start out highly resistive to changes of any sort, and see any upcoming change in their life as something foreboding and scary. Death dreams are usually about change.

... DreamPedia

INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS

Dreampedia

“All dreams are given for the benefit of the individual, would he but interpret them correctly.”
EDGAR CAYCE

Most dreams are full of images: of people dead and alive, known and unknown, animals both domestic and wild, landscapes and buildings familiar and strange, or any number of other symbolic images such as jewelry, household things, clothing, and so on. A dream usually has some kind of a story line. You may find yourself on an adventure of some kind. You may dream of celebrities or other famous people either from the present or the past.

I once had a fascinating dream of visiting the president Woodrow Wilson, who had been in office during the time of World War I, long before I was even born. During my dream visit to the president, we talked of many things of a psychic and occult nature. I wondered what it meant. When I discussed this dream with my dreamwork partner, who was a good bit older than I and very knowledgeable about matters concerning the occult, he told me that Woodrow Wilson had held seances in the White House! At the time, I was just beginning my own studies of the occult and having psychic experiences on a regular basis.

Food is another symbol that often appears in dreams. The kind of food and how it is presented and eaten (if eating occurs) are matters for the dreamer to understand. Food dreams may relate to what you had for supper—or what you wanted to have and didn’t get. Or you may have food concerns, such as being on a diet to lose weight or trying to gain weight.

The number of symbols that the dream-mind can produce is practically endless, and most of these symbols are up for individual interpretation. Some, however, have universal meaning. We’ll discuss mostly the first kind in this chapter.

PERSONAL DREAM SYMBOLS

One of the best ways to get at the meaning of the symbols in your dreams is by free association. This is the method made popular by the psychologist Sigmund Freud. In this method, you simply go with the first thing that pops into your mind when the trigger word is given. Do the exercises presented on pages 48–50 in order to begin to get familiar with your own word associations.

AMPLIFICATION OF SYMBOLIC MEANINGS

Once you have identified a symbol in a dream, you can use the free association process to get at its meaning. If you don’t immediately get an associative thought about the dream symbol, work backward through your feelings and experiences with the symbol until you hit something that fits or makes sense. Suppose, for example, that you see a tiger in a dream. Do you like tigers or are they an object of fear? Maybe you saw a nature film recently about tigers and are concerned about their survival as a species. The important thing is to discover what a tiger means to you in the present, for the meanings of your symbols can change over time.

As you begin to work with your dreams on a regular basis and gain a high level of ability to recall your dreams (which we’ll discuss in chapter 5), you will become familiar with your own personal symbolic style. Most of us are influenced symbolically by the objects we are familiar with—such as religious symbols like crosses and pictures of saints or holy people—and also by our everyday life experiences. For example, if you have a pet of any kind, you are likely to dream about that animal. Of course, you may dream about animals even if you don’t keep a pet, and you may dream about wild animals. But if you dream of your own pet, it will have personal significance to you alone.

Sometimes you have a dream that seems to complete some unfinished business of the day—say you had a math problem you couldn’t solve and you dreamed yourself in a classroom with the solution written on the blackboard. Freud believed that dreams were “wish fulfillment” vehicles, and it is true that we can dream of things or experiences that we want (such as getting a date with a particular person) but dreams are much, much more than simple wish fulfillment. They are complex and multileveled, as you will realize by working steadily with your dreams.

“Then your I is no longer your mundane little self but the I of the Big Dreamer who is dreaming the whole universe.”
Fred A. Wolf, Physicist

Most dream symbols are not to be taken literally. You often need to do a bit of sleuthing to get at what the message of the dream symbol, or story, is for you. An example I read in one dream book was a dream of Bob Hope hopping on a pogo stick. At first, this seems nonsensical, but the dreamer was depressed and the dream was interpreted as “Hope springs eternal.” Here’s an example of a recent series of dreams of my own, concerning food.

  • I was preparing to go on an eating program that required the elimination of all sugar, and as soon as I had set a date to begin I started having dreams of all kinds of luscious desserts—beautifully iced and decorated cakes, pies piled high with whipped cream, the most enticing confections of chocolate from cakes to cookies and everything in between, pastries stuffed with sweet cheese and iced with thick sugar, fancy French fruit tarts of every description.
  • At first, I took this to be simple resistance of my unconscious to changing my eating habits, but I actually don’t eat a lot of sweets, and when I do have dessert I favor simple, homey things like custard, stewed fruit, or fruit cobbler. I’ve never had a taste for heavily iced cakes, plus I am one of the few people on the planet who doesn’t like chocolate! So why was I dreaming of all these fancy sweet foods that I wouldn’t even want to eat?
  • My first take on the dreams—of which there were several during a week or so—was that I was feeling deprived in advance and that my imagination was plying me with these luscious images of sweets to weaken my decision to eliminate sweets. But this didn’t make a lot of sense, as the fancy confections weren’t what I’d want to eat anyway. So I looked deeper.
  • What was food as a symbol to me, especially this kind of elaborately prepared party food? Well, party food means a party—or at least company for dinner. I’d been going through a period of relative isolation, partly because I was busy writing and partly because I hadn’t been feeling up to par. My social life had dropped to almost zero. The dreams were actually telling me that I was feeling deprived of—not the coming lack of sweets—but what special food, especially desserts, represents socially. Food of course represents nourishment; however, my dreams were not about nutrition! My first interpretation of deprivation was definitely a clue to the true meaning of the dreams. Yet they were a message that I needed, not sweets, but some sweet occasions and to take the time to be with people more. Can you think of a get-together that doesn’t involve food? Usually fancy food, and always, desserts.
  • Using this as an example, think of what dreams of fancy desserts might mean to you. And if you’ve ever dreamed of food, try to remember what kind of food and under what circumstances you dreamed of it. Then think of what those various foods might symbolize for you.

Here’s another example along the same lines, but with a different twist—that of a lemon peel!

  • A friend had been struggling with his weight, and he had decided to quit drinking his nightly martini in order to cut out some calories. He had decided to switch to a single glass of wine with dinner instead. He did this and found himself enjoying his new way of dining. But then he started having dreams about martinis. For about a week, he told me, he had nothing but dreams featuring martinis, with a twist of lemon peel. He had always put olives in his martinis, not lemon peel, so this puzzled him. When he told me about the dreams, I flashed on the standard language of a bartender, who when taking an order for a martini will say, “Do you want a twist?” After some discussion of what the word twist meant to him, he revealed that he had recently twisted his ankle and it had been quite painful, but he hadn’t bothered to see a doctor about the problem. His dream was showing him that a “twist” was in need of his attention. It didn’t relate to his martini drinking at all, except that this was a familiar picture and dreams always speak in our own language, even if they do twist it around a bit!

It is interesting to note that some types of dreams that we know to be quite common have never been reported from sleep labs (as least not as far as I have found in my research). One of these is the nightmare. It seems that people don’t want to tell their deepest fears to a sleep lab researcher. Another common type is the wet dream, so named for when a male ejaculates semen while dreaming (though females also have this type of sexual dream). It is interesting to note that most of the subjects in sleep labs are young male college students, whom one might presume to often have wet dreams. But these are, apparently, considered too private to dream when under observation.

Most dreams are not to be taken literally; just because you dream of someone dying does not mean the person will die. In fact, the literal interpretation of dreams can be dangerous and cause fear and anxiety. Also, dream books are not to be trusted. It’s worth repeating that you have your own set of inner symbolic meanings. What a cat means to me—an avid cat lover—and what a cat means to someone who hates or fears cats would be something quite different. Always remember that your inner symbol-producing mechanism is yours alone, unique. That being emphasized, there are a few symbols that can be considered universal, such as the ocean or water representing the unconscious processes.

The best way for you to learn to interpret your own personal symbol system is by continually paying attention to your dreams, writing them down, and doing your own interpretations. Dream interpretation is an art, not a science, and no scientific sleep lab can read the content or measure the meaning of dreams. Isis, the ancient Egyptian goddess queen, was believed to say “No mortal has lifted my veil,” and this can well apply to the scientific efforts to penetrate the mysteries of dream in sleep labs.

If you are just beginning to pay attention to your dreams, begin the process of interpretation by recording the symbols that appear most frequently. This applies especially to any recurring dreams or motifs you may experience. For example, I know that when my cat Fuzz (who’s dead now) appears in a dream, it means my heart center is the subject of the dream. Depending on the story line of the dream and what Fuzz is doing or how we are interacting, I can figure out what the dream message about my heart is.

“There are a lot of people on the planet right now who don’t think that dreams are important. Perhaps it is that attitude which contributes to the ill health of the planet as a whole. If so, it depends more and more on you, the Spiritual Warriors of your generation, to weave the dreams that can heal the planet.”

Dr. Laurel Ann Reinhardt, “Dream Weaving,” in The Thundering Years by Julie Johnson

  • Recently, I dreamed that Fuzz had been hit by a car, but I knew instinctively that he was still alive. My brother was waiting outside in a car and I asked him to take me to find Fuzz and get an emergency vet. He did and Fuzz was saved. The dream came on the heels of a severe disappointment (one might say I was heartbroken), but I was being told that everything would come out all right in the end, which it did.
  • What is interesting about this dream is that even though I did not see the cat get hit by the car, I knew he was still alive. This told me that although I had been hurt emotionally, I would get over it. It also showed me that help was at hand—my brother was waiting in the car, and a vet was readily available. I had friends I could turn to who would help me to heal from a hurtful experience. In this way, our dreams spill over into everyday life.
  • The world of dream and intuition is really not divorced from our everyday reality, not a thing apart. Most people today think their dreams have nothing to do with real life, but they are wrong. We are all multifaceted beings with complexities of which often we are hardly aware. Too many people operate solely on linear thinking (the standard modern-day mode that is taught to young people in schools) and aren’t aware that there are other ways to think and to obtain information. As Seth, the “spirit guide” that Jane Roberts “channeled” in a series of books “by” Seth, says, “You must change your ideas about dreaming, alter your concepts about it, before you can begin to explore it. Otherwise, your own waking prejudice will close the door.”

    All of the many facets of our personalities are operating all the time, even when we aren’t conscious of them, just like our body chemistry goes on about its business when we are totally unaware of its functioning. Dreams can speak to parts of ourselves that we are ignoring, but we can’t get the benefit from them unless we pay attention and approach their symbolic messages with an open mind and trusting heart.

    While the symbolism in dreams may require interpretation, when we have difficulty with it we must realize that its purpose isn’t to mystify us. As Dr. Jung says in his autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections:

    • I was never able to agree with Freud that the dream is a “façade” behind which its meaning lies hidden—a meaning already known but maliciously, so to speak, withheld from consciousness. To me dreams are a part of nature, which harbors no intentions to deceive but expresses something as best it can just as a plant grows or an animal seeks its food as best it can.

    In working with your own personal dream symbols and motifs to decipher the meaning of your dreams, you may need to come at them from all angles. The following mind-mapping technique is especially helpful for those who function better using pictures and images, colors and drawings, than using a strictly verbal or writing mode.

    As you practice interpreting your dreams and get more deeply into the process, it will become an enjoyable habit and you’ll soon feel like an old pro at the game. You will get better and better, and your confidence will start to soar. Even if you have only a scrap of a dream to go on, it can lead to fruitful ideas. Here’s an example from my personal files:

    • The Dream: A blond man speaks to me at a hotel of some sort. He breaks into French as his English fails him, and though I don’t know French well I understand what he is saying. He gives me a key, which looks like the key to the security lock on my front door in real life. I ask what it is for and he replies that I will find out. When I go back to my room at the hotel I find that the key fits into a TV set, tuning it to a higher octave or a channel, like UHF, but much higher than that. I watch something on this “TV” but don’t really understand it.
    • My interpretation of this brief fragment (for there was more I didn’t remember) is that I am being given the “key” to a higher channel of myself. I don’t yet know how to use this channel, and I can’t understand what is being shown on this new type of TV. In other words, I am receiving communications in a language I don’t fully understand. This dream had great meaning for me, as I was at that time in the process of becoming “psychic,” but didn’t really know what it meant or where it would lead. Later on, I experienced the “opening of the psychic door” on a trip to Germany, became a Tarot card reader, a professional astrologer, and a psychotherapist. This dream seemed to forecast these developments. That the man was blond suggests the Sun, or Higher Mind. His speaking in French might be a reference to my own French ancestors, all of whom spoke French as their native language, yet it was not taught to me so I grew up speaking English from day one. This hinted that I already “knew” the “foreign” language from hearing it spoken as a child.

    With a little skill, you’ll be able to start integrating your dreams into everyday life. We’ll get into this in the next chapter, where we discuss how you can use dreams for specific purposes. However, please approach the entire subject of your dreams, their interpretations, and how you can use them with an open mind and in a relaxed state. Getting tense over interpretation is counterproductive and will block your efforts to make connections.... Dreampedia

INTERPRETING DREAMS IN 4 EASY STEPS

Dreampedia

In Dreampedia, we give a full teaching on each step you need to take. We here just going to give you a quick summary. This should be enough to whet your appetite and give you what you need to interpret your dreams right away!

Every character, object and building in your dream is symbolic of a part of yourself and your life. This one principle alone changes your entire view of dream interpretation.

It is a common mistake for people to misinterpret the people and objects in their dreams as the real thing. This is a big mistake! If I dream of Aunty Pat throwing a cream pie in my face, I certainly do not have to fear visiting her for Thanksgiving!

It is symbolic and Aunty Pat is a picture of a part of me. If Aunty pat is an aggressive woman that tends to dominate others, then she could represent my will in this dream. Identifying the characters in your dream is the very first step to gaining an understanding of what your dreams are saying.

In fact just by identifying your dream category and then identifying the symbols, you will already have an idea of what your dream is speaking about.

This goes for buildings, animals or any kind of object in your dream. If you dream that your house is being broken down, you do not need to rush out and buy more insurance. Your house is just a picture of your life.

This opens up a whole new world to you! Many common symbols crop up in our dreams and I will give you some interpretations for them later on. In fact, in my DAV Symbol Dictionary, I supply a comprehensive list of all the characters and scenarios and their interpretations.

2. Good is Great. Bad is...well...bad.

Understanding what the characters in your dream represent is just the first step. It is also very important to determine if that character is playing a positive or a negative role in your dreams.

This alone can turn your interpretation right around. If I dream that my house is being torn down, it can be positive or negative. If your house is being torn down so that something bigger can be built, it means that you are in a process of growing spiritually and mentally in your life right now.

However if your house is being bombed by terrorists or torn down by a storm, it means that you are facing some severe attack in your life right now and that you are falling apart.

Do you see what I mean? In both cases...once again the house is a symbol of your life. It does not speak of your actual house and you do not need to fear a sudden invasion of terrorists ok?

3. Everything is About You

It’s your dream. It’s your life. It’s about YOU!

Another big mistake that people make is that they think if they dream of someone else that the dream is for that person. It’s a bit ridiculous actually. If you dream that your co‐worker falls pregnant, I would certainly not rush to them and announce the good news!

Not only will you be wrong, but every time you head for the coffee machine the other co‐workers might suddenly find a reason to be somewhere else...

Hmmm, I get the feeling that some folks reading this might have made this mistake a few times. Not to worry though! There is hope.

Keep in mind that because the characters in your dream are a picture of yourself, the dream is a message for you. These dreams are a depiction of what is going on inside of you right now and often also refer to events that happened in the past.

Either way, you are the star of this show and it’s all about YOU!

4. Identifying the Message

It is important to remember that an internal dream has a single message. If your dream has lots of characters and scene changes, then it is a garbage dream and does not have an interpretation.

By identifying the symbols in your dreams and determining if they are given in a positive or negative context, you are armed with everything you need to identify the message.

To show you how simple this is, I am going to take a few of the dreams posted on our Dreams and Visions forum and I am going to break it down for you.

I will be using the entries from the DAV Dictionary so that you can see exactly how to use it.... Dreampedia

INTERPRETING YOUR DREAMS

Dreampedia

Interpreting your dreams can be a lot of fun. As we’ve said, it can also give you valuable insight. Dreams are like coded messages from your unconscious mind. When you decode them, you gain access to a wealth of intuitive wisdom.

Remember that only you can interpret your dreams. Many people have published “Dream Dictionaries” that describe what each part of the dream symbolizes. Actually, the same dream can have infinite meanings, depending on the person who dreamed it. The important thing is, what does it mean to YOU?

Interpreting dreams isn’t something you can pick up and become an expert at right away. It takes time and practice. First, keep the following things in mind:

  • Dreams are the reaction of the inner self to daytime activity and often show the way out of the dilemma. So relate them to current activity, because dreams may be retrospective as well as prospective.
  • Observe carefully recurrent dreams, as well as the serially progressive ones. These often illustrate progress or failure.
  • Be practical in your interpretations. Always look first for a lesson. What have you refused to face or been ignoring?
  • Dreams come to guide and help, not to amuse. They direct your attention to errors of omission and commission and offer encouragement for right endeavors. They also give us the opportunity to pray for others and to help them bear their burdens.
  • Look for past-life experiences in your dreams. These manifest themselves not only in color, but in the proper costume and setting of their period. They come to warn you against repeating the same old mistakes; to explain your relationship and reactions to certain people and places; to reduce your confusions; to enable you to better understand life.
  • Dreams that are unchanged through the years indicate the dreamer’s resistance to change.The difficulty most people have with interpreting their own dreams is that they aren’t objective enough. Their familiarity with the people and places in their dreams obscures the dreams meaning. Experts have come up with the “I AM and I NEED” formula, devised to overcome this. Here’s how it works.
    Once you have your dream written on paper, get two different colored pens. Using one color, underline every negative word or phrase in the dream which indicates limitation, disrespect, containment, avoidance or damage.
    Using the other color, underline every positive word or phrase. You now make two lists. List the negative words and phrases under a column titled I AM. List the positive words and phrases under a column titled I NEED. You are almost ready to interpret your dream.

Determine the subject matter of the dream. The location where the dream takes place is one of the best methods for doing this. When you have determined the subject matter take each of the phrases or words in the ‘I AM’ column and fit them into the following sentence.

When it comes to my (subject matter) I AM (phrase or keyword)

Change the phrase or keyword slightly to force the sentence to make sense. If you cannot determine the subject matter apply the keywords to yourself in general. This exercise tells you how you feel or react to the subject matter of the dream. When you have done this read through the ‘I NEED’ column to learn what you must do to correct the problem. To get the meaning put each of the phrases or keywords into the sentence,

When it comes to my (subject matter) I NEED (phrase or keyword)

Let’s take an example. Using the sentence ‘The dead woman lay on the cold hard slab’. The negative keywords are; dead, cold and hard. Women, in dreams, can represent emotions so in this case the sentences constructed would be

  • When it comes to my emotions I am dead.
  • When it comes to my emotions I am cold.
  • When it comes to my emotions I am hard.

The meaning is obvious. With analyzing just one sentence from a dream we have learned a lot about the dreamer. Using this technique you now have all of the information you need to start interpreting your dreams. However it takes practice to be able to apply what you have learned. Be patient with your efforts.

Not all dream interpretations will be that cut and dried, but it is a way to remain objective when you are analyzing what your dreams mean and how best to put the messages they are conveying to good use in your life.

Keep in mind that Most dreams are * NOT * precognitive, and once one learns the subtle differences between a precognitive dream versus a regular dream, they are easily discernable and will put your mind at ease.

The first thing everyone should consider is the typical universal symbology of the dream images. For instance, death symbolizes the end of something that’s ready for change, and a new beginning. Most people start out highly resistive to changes of any sort, and see any upcoming change in their life as something foreboding and scary. Death dreams are usually about change.

The symbols and what they represent is the most fascinating part of dream interpretation. There are literally hundreds of them. We don’t have the space to address ALL of them, but we will touch on some of the most recurring themes in dreams as well as the symbols of those dreams and what they mean.... Dreampedia

INTERPRETING YOUR DREAMS

Dreampedia

“If the dream is a translation of waking life, waking life is also a translation of the dream.”
René Magritte

If you have ever wondered why dreams often appear so difficult to make sense of, it is because the information they contain is presented in a different language; the language of symbols: of people alive or dead, known and unknown, animals both domestic and wild, landscapes and buildings familiar and strange, or any number of symbolic objects such as shapes, colors, signs, numbers, jewelry, food, clothing and so on.

These images are your own thoughts, feelings and ideas turned into a series of pictures like ordinary scenes in your daily life. For example, if you feel overwhelmed you may have a dream you are swimming but finding it hard to keep your head above water. If you feel confused you may have a dream when you are wondering about lost in a dark forest. The number of symbols and images that your mind can translate into dream pictures is practically endless.

Words just can’t convey the countless powerful feelings that symbols do. These symbols are often chosen from something that has caught our attention in waking life, triggering a memory, conflict or concern that resonates both in the present and in the past.

One tried-and-tested way to uncover the meaning of your dream images is by direct association. You simply go with the first thing that pops into your head when a trigger image from your dream is given. If you don’t immediately get an associative thought, try working through all your feelings about that image. For example, if you saw a caterpillar in a dream. Do you like caterpillars or do you find them a bit creepy? Try to discover what the image means to you right now, for the meanings of your symbols will change over time.

The more you work with your dreams, the more familiar you will become with your personal images. You’ll probably find that you dream the most about the things that you are familiar with every day: your family, your colleagues, your friends and your pet. Each time you dream about these familiar things they will have personal significance to you alone.

The great majority of dreams are not to be taken literally and you need to do a bit of detective work to get to the real message. Just because you dream that a friend is dying does not mean that he or she will die, but rather that they are going through a period of enormous change. In fact, interpreting dreams literally can be harmful. As pointed out earlier, you have your own set of unique dream images and symbols. If you love dogs, what a dog means to you and what a dog means to someone who can’t stand dogs will be very different. Always bear in mind that your dream symbols and images are unique to you.

Although the images and symbols in your dreams do need to be interpreted, their purpose isn’t to mystify you. They are simply trying to get their message across in the best way that they can. If you do find yourself getting tense, confused or frustrated when trying to interpret a dream, let it go. Dream interpretation is best approached with an open mind and in a relaxed state.

You don’t need to interpret every single dream you have. In the same way that some movies are more compelling and thoughtprovoking than others, some dreams, like those when you do fantastic things like flying into space or surfing in Hawaii, are simply to be enjoyed. You don’t always have to dig deep for meaning. It’s good to be aware that a dream might contain a message of importance, but don’t get obsessed with finding meanings for every single detail —just interpret what you can. Dreams, like life, are full of big and little stuff. Don’t sweat the ‘small stuff’.... Dreampedia

JOKES IN DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

See wordplay, puns. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

LETTERS IN DREAMS

Dreamers Dictionary

A Something unique, the beginning of a new event or project.

B Self-isolation, things hidden and not yet known.

C Matter that surrounds spirit, language, throat.

D Symbol for food and growth/development.

E Bridge between body and spirit, call for unity.

F Symbol for the outside and inner world, insight, hope, understanding.

G Weapon, staff, scepter—conquest and/or domination.

H Balanced, self-improvement.

I The human need for safety and severity.

J Adviser, admonishing or threatening index finger.

K Creative vitality, straightforward action, abundant energy.

L Reaching arm, striving for material and/or intellectual fortune.

M Mother, woman, fertility, creative energy.

N Masculine spirit stimulated by the feminine.

O The circle, insurmountable limits of fate.

P Mishaps, bad luck, accidents, disappointments, negative experiences.

Q The result of our action, our language.

R Male energy’, used to pursue our goals.

S Weapons, tools, techniques, and support.

T The cross, origin of your power/energy.

U The cup, the chalice, the passing of life/rime. Success, victory, the search for completeness.

W No specific symbols could be found, but possibly refers the ups and downs of life.

X The ten, checkmarks, crossing out.

Y The unknown, sometimes also sexual needs.

Z Risk decisions, lightning, electricity.... Dreamers Dictionary

LUCID DREAMS

Strangest Dream Explanations

Being conscious during the dream state represents a high level of mastery. You are realizing your ability to powerfully orchestrate your life that will help you achieve clarity and empowerment in your life.... Strangest Dream Explanations

LUCID DREAMS

My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are able to control the action in your dreams, indicates your growing confidence, high self-esteem and increasing skills. Alternatively, this type of dream may be a way of compensating for a waking situation in which you felt powerless.... My Dream Interpretation

NEGATIVE SYMBOLS IN DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Dream symbols can have both positive and negative associations, but some dream symbols do tend to have more negative associations than positive and these include:

Acid: This suggests a corrosive, negative influence in your life.

Adder: There may be a situation in which another person cannot be trusted.

Atom bomb: Fear that someone else might destroy your happiness.

Avalanche: A destructive force in your life.

Bad: If you feel bad in your dream, this suggests that something is off balance in your waking life and that your environment is not positive for you.

Barbed wire: Hurtful remarks are preventing you moving forward.

Bed wetting: Anxieties over lack of control in your life.

Behind: To be behind someone in your dream suggests that you feel inferior to them.

Bite: Being bitten or biting someone is a symbol of aggression or hostility.

Boar: Lust and gluttony.

Brutality: The darker, more animalistic side of your nature.

Burglar: Violation of personal space.

Chain: Restriction.

Choke: Inability to express yourself.

Crooked line: Insincerity.

Devil: Personification of the evil side of yourself.

Dirty: Not at ease with your body, or lack of trust in someone or something.

Drowning: Feeling overwhelmed.

Earthquake: Emotional upheaval.

Empty and failure: Lack of energy and enthusiasm.

Falling: Lack of confidence.

Gall: Feelings of bitterness.

Hole: A difficult or tricky situation; can also suggest emptiness.

Hood: Deceit.

Ice: Frozen emotions.

Immobility: Feeling stuck.

Leak: Losing energy.

Leper: Feeling inferior or unworthy.

Maggots: Impurities that can eat away at you; fears of death and illness.

Mantis: Something devious within your life.

Marsh: Feeling held back or bogged down.

Mist: Emotional confusion.

Noose: Fear of being trapped.

Obscenity: lower aspects of the self.

Parasites: Someone is attempting to live off your energy.

Poverty: Feelin g deprived of the ability to satisfy your basic needs.

Pus: Something which is festering and has gone bad in your life.

Sadism: Desire to cause harm to yourself or others.

Scar: Old hurts that have not been dealt with.

Sick: Bad feelings you need to get rid of.

Tar: Emotions have become contaminated.

Torture: Trying to come to terms with a great hurt.

Traitor: An aspect of yourself that is letting you down.

Trespassing: Intruding on someone else’s personal space; lack of healthy boundaries.

Unemployment: Not making the best use of your talents.

Vampire: Fear of the unknown and negative energy. War: Conflict.

Winter: Time in your life which is unfruitful. Wound: Hurt feelings or emotions.

X: An error or something of which you need to take notice.

Yawn: Boredom, but also a warning against aggression or abuse.... The Element Encyclopedia

OBSCENE DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

It is reasonable and healthy for all of us to have a dream which surprises us or shocks us occasionally. As dreams partly deal with aspects of our urges and fantasies which we do not allow in waking life, such occasional dreams are safety valves.

It is healthy to be able to allow a wide range of dream experience, from the holy to the deeply sexual; from outright aggression to tender love. In fact we gain an idea of the depth and broadness of our own soul—whether or not our psyche is narrow—from the range of dreams we experience.

If obscene dreams assail and worry us again and again, however, then there is a problem in the way we are relating to ourself and the exterior world. Psychotherapeutic counselling might help. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

PHILOSOPHY OF DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In attempting to put together the information gathered from viewing thousands of dreams—not simply at face value, but explored in depth through the emo­tions and direct associations of the dreamer—a philosophy or view of life arises. It suggests that our birth as a physical and psychological being is a paradox. We are unique, and at the same time a common undifferentiated person. Psychologically we have our identity out of the lives of thousands of humans who preceded us and left the gift of language, of music, an, of concepts and information. Our mental life, our consciousness, is in some very real way formed out of what they left from their life. Our consciousness has been hewn out of the rock of possibilities by the love, the struggle and pain, the endeavour and wit of their lives. Particularly our psyche has been shaped by or modelled on our parents, and the traces in their life, unknown though they may be, of their parents, backwards for many generations.

Our identity is given to us by the humans who raise us. This sense of self arises because we are treated as if we were a self. This, with language, is the creative matrix of our self awareness.

The giving of a name is therefore a miracle which acts as a nucleus around which the many mental connections can be made which form our self image. Perhaps this is why giving the name in baptism is seen as a holy rite in Chris­tianity.

Our conscious personality can live without ever becoming aware of its connections with other lives except as it meets them in everyday affairs. That its existence has depended upon what was given by countless other lives—that humans constantly create each other, consciously and unconsciously, through the dynamic flux of communication—might never be realised. That one’s own life is also a part of this creative process, this sea of living consciousness, might never be known. Nevertheless, each individual life constantly takes pan in the collective, negatively or positively. This is not a mystical thing, but is plainly observable. From the point of view of dreams, if our life has given nothing in deed, in love, in rearing of children, in ideas or art, or in common human­ity, we are dead—during life and afterwards. Giving and re­ceiving, kinship and symbiosis, growth and decay are the fun­damentals of the living process according to dreams.

At death, we face a very real end, a real death. There is no magical escape from this. All that we have been, all we have become, all we gathered and won is lost—finished. But the paradox occurs again. Dreams suggest that out of all we gave of ourself, out of all we received from the being of others, we are recreated in a realm of consciousness. This may mean that we continue as living influences in the lives of those who still live. But the suggestion is that something more than this oc­curs. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

PLAYING CARDS IN DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Long before people used cards to play games, they were used to foretell the future. In fact, playing cards were invented for divination rather than for entertainment. Bear in mind that dreams comment on future possibilities rather than predict the future, but if a particular card is highlighted in your dream, the following traditional divinatory meanings may suggest possible situations you might like to encourage or avoid in your waking life. First of all, the suits are associated with the four elements as follows: Hearts—Water; Clubs—Fire; Diamonds—Earth; Spades—Air. The individual card meanings are as follows:

Ace of Hearts: Love and happiness; a particularly favorable card that indicates troubles lifting.

King of Hearts: A fair-haired man with a good nature; or a man with water signs predominating in his chart; fair, helpful advice. Affectionate, caring man. This man helps you out without much talk; his actions reveal his kindness and concern.

Queen of Hearts: A fair-haired woman with a good nature; or a woman with water signs predominating in her chart; kind advice. Affectionate, caring woman. This card can sometimes indicate the mother or a mother figure.

Jack of Hearts: A warm-hearted friend; a fair-haired youth; or a young person with water signs predominating in their chart; often points to a younger admirer.

10 of Hearts: Good luck; success; this is an important card that suggests good fortune after difficulty.

9 of Hearts: The card of wishes; a wish or dream fulfilled.

8 of Hearts: Unexpected gift or visit; an invitation to a party.

7 of Hearts: Someone whose interest in you is unreliable; someone with fickle affections for you; can indicate lovesickness.

6 of Hearts: A sudden wave of good luck; someone takes care of you or takes a warm interest in you.

5 of Hearts: Jealousy; some ill-will from people around you.

4 of Hearts: Travel; change of home or business.

3 of Hearts: Love and happiness; can also indicate emotional problems and an inability to decide who to love.

2 of Hearts: A warm partnership or engagement; a very favorable card that indicates strength and support coming from a partner.

Ace of Clubs: Wealth, prosperity, unexpected money; can also suggest mismanagement of money.

King of Clubs: Dark-haired, kindhearted man; or a man with fire predominating in his chart; a generous, spirited man.

Queen of Clubs: Dark-haired, confident woman; or a woman with fire predominating in her chart; she may give you good advice.

Jack of Clubs: A dark-haired or fiery youth; a popular youth who is good-hearted and playful; can also indicate an admirer.

10 of Clubs: Business success; good luck with money; a trip taken now may result in a new friend or love interest.

9 of Clubs: Achievement; sometimes a wealthy marriage or sudden windfall.

8 of Clubs: Work or business problems that may have to do with jealousy.

7 of Clubs: Business success, although there may be problems with the opposite sex; a change in business that may have been expected or earned, such as a promotion.

6 of Clubs: Financial aid or success.

5 of Clubs: New friendships or alliances are made.

4 of Clubs: Beware of dishonesty or deceit; avoid blind acceptance of others at this time.

3 of Clubs: Love and happiness; successful marriage; a favorable long-term proposition; a second chance, often in an economic sense.

2 of Clubs: Obstacles to success; malicious gossip.

Ace of Spades: Misfortune; sometimes associated with a difficult ending.

King of Spades: Dark-haired man; or a man with air predominating in his chart; an ambitious, perhaps self-serving, man.

Queen of Spades: Widowed or divorced woman; a woman with air predominating in her chart.

Jack of Spades: A youth who is demanding or jealous.

10 of Spades: Worry; bad news.

9 of Spades: Misfortune; a personal low.

8 of Spades: Temptation; danger; upsets.

7 of Spades: Advice that is best not taken; loss; there is some obstacle to success, and this indicates that obstacles may be coming from within you.

6 of Spades: Small changes and improvements.

5 of Spades: Opposition and obstacles that are temporary; a blessing in disguise; sometimes indicates a negative or depressed person.

4 of Spades: Small worries; problems; financial difficulties, personal lows.

3 of Spades: Breaks or conflict in relationships.

2 of Spades: Deceit; may also warn against possible infidelity or separation.

Ace of Diamonds: Change; a message, often about money, and usually good news.

King of Diamonds: Fair-haired or graying man; a man with earth predominating in his chart; a man of authority, status, or influence.

Queen of Diamonds: Fair-haired woman; a woman with earth predominating in her chart; a gossip.

Jack of Diamonds: A youth, possibly in uniform; a jealous person who may be unreliable; a person who brings news, generally negative, but relatively minor.

10 of Diamonds: A change in financial status, often for the better.

9 of Diamonds: A new business deal; travel; restlessness; a change of residence.

8 of Diamonds: New job; change in job situation; the young or the old may find love on a trip.

7 of Diamonds: An argument concerning finances or employment, generally expected to be resolved happily.

6 of Diamonds: Relationship problems; arguments; separation.

5 of Diamonds: Happiness and success; a change for the better; a birth, or good news for a child; a good time to start new projects.

4 of Diamonds: Financial upswing; an older person may give good advice.

3 of Diamonds: A legal letter; be tactful with others in order to avoid disputes.

2 of Diamonds: A business partnership; a change in relationship; gossip.... The Element Encyclopedia

PRECOGNITIVE DISASTER DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

The following precognitive disaster dreams certainly challenge our preconceptions and rational explanations about how the world and the dreaming mind relate to one another.

In his book Recollections of Abraham Lincoln, 1847-1865, Ward Hill Lamon relates a dream Lincoln had shortly before his death. In the dream, Lincoln heard a group of people mournfully weeping downstairs in the White House, but when he went to investigate, he found no mourners, although their desperate weeping continued. Upon entering the East Room he discovered a corpse wrapped in funeral vestments. Demanding of one of the soldiers stationed there, ‘Who is dead in the White House?,’ he received the reply, ‘The President. He was killed by an assassin.’ A day before the SS Titanic’s demise, a woman on the infamous ship dreamt of the horrible event that was to occur the next day. She told her husband, who scoffed at her worries and ignored her pleas. However, the dream so affected her that she secretly prepared herself the night before and had all her children sleep in their warm clothes in order to be ready at a moment’s notice. During the night, after the ship struck the iceberg, she and her children were rescued and escaped the sinking ship. Her husband, sadly, went down with more than 1,500 people.

In 1914, one hundred and twenty Newfoundland sealers were abandoned on an ice-floe in the North Atlantic during winter. The incompetence of the ship’s captain, and of other crew members, meant that the missing men were not noticed for two days and two nights. By the time they were rescued, more than half were dead. It was the worst disaster to strike the Newfoundland sealing community in many years. However, the disaster did not come without warning. One of the fiftyfive survivors later told of a dream he had two weeks before the disaster. According to Cassie Brown’s report on the disaster: ‘John Howlet had suffered a chilling nightmare weeks before. In his dream he was on a mountain of ice, lost and freezing. He was alone, terribly and frighteningly alone, but everywhere he wandered there were vague, indefinable “things” on the ice around him—things with no particular shape that he could make out. He found himself walking among those things, unable to find his way, wondering what they were and dreading them. In his dream he was counting, counting, counting…He was still counting the white mounds when he awoke, shivering and terribly depressed.’

Unfortunately, even this dream did not make him avoid joining the crew of the ship, Newfoundland, most of whom would be dead in a matter of days. It was only afterwards he realized that the bodies covered with snow were the white mounds from his dream.

In his autobiography, Jung recounts disturbing dreams and visions in 1913. In one vision he witnessed a monstrous flood covering Germany and realized a catastrophe was in progress. ‘I saw the mighty yellow waves, the floating rubble of civilization, and the drowned bodies of uncounted thousands. Then the whole sea turned to blood.’ Jung said he was perplexed and nauseated, assuming this vision was personal. It was not until World War I broke out a year later that he realized its collective nature. This irrational experience led Jung to conclude that each person’s unconscious possesses not only a personal, but also a collective, dimension.

Probably one of the best-established and most reputable cases of premonitions of disaster comes from the grim events that occurred on 21 October 1966 in Aberfan, Wales. On that day, 116 children and twenty-eight adults were killed when a large mountain of coal collapsed and buried a small section of the town of Aberfan, including an elementary school filled with children. The disaster touched nearly every family in the town and effectively extinguished an entire generation of children. After the disaster, the reports of premonitions began to flood in. The mother of one of the deceased students reported that her ten-year-old child (who died in the disaster) had a dream the night before which foretold the disaster. The child told her mother, ‘I dreamed I went to school and there was no school there.

Something black had come down all over it.’

The reports of precognitive dreams literally came from all over Wales and England. One lady had a nightmare that she suffocated in ‘deep blackness’. Another dreamed of a small child being buried by a large landslide. Another clearly saw a schoolhouse be buried by an avalanche of coal, and rescue workers digging frantically for survivors. Another woke up from a nightmare in which she was being buried alive. On the morning of the disaster, Mrs Sybil Brown woke from a dream in which she saw children being overcome by ‘a black, billowing mass’. Probably the clearest of the premonitions was reported by a man in north-west England who claimed that the night before the disaster he had a dream which consisted only of letters being spelled out in dazzling light: A-B-E-R-F-A-N. At the time, the dream had no meaning to him. Hours later, he would realize with horror what it meant.

An interesting phenomenon occurred in the aftermath of the terrorist plane attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center and damaged the Pentagon on 11 September 2001: numerous people came forward with reports of vivid dreams they’d had of these disasters in advance. The dreams were filled with images that later took place: planes crashing into buildings, planes crashing on the ground, tall buildings collapsing, flames shooting out of buildings, people running covered in gray ash, and feelings of panic, mass death and war. These nightmarish dreams were so realistic that many people awoke from them in terror and sweat.

The question most often raised about precognitive disaster dreams is, if so many people dreamed in advance of these disasters, why could nothing have been done to prevent them? The answer is that most people who have precognitive dreams only realize that they have had them after the events the dreams foretold have taken place, and they see how their dreams matched the events. Other dreamers, especially those who have periodic or frequent precognitive dreams, usually do not dream enough specific details to know exactly what is going to happen, where, and when. Some may only have a sense of dread that ‘something terrible’ is going to happen, usually soon. For example, a dream that a tall building is collapsing would not have sparked the immediate connection that terrorists were going to fly planes into the World Trade Center on the morning of 11 September 2001. A dream analyst would more likely interpret the image dream within the context of the dreamer’s life, suggesting that the dream reflected emotional turmoil within the dreamer’s life.... The Element Encyclopedia

PRECOGNITIVE DREAMS

Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)... Strangest Dream Explanations

PRECOGNITIVE DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Carl Jung believed that the unconscious could be revealed through dreams, premonitions or synchronistic experiences. Most often these revelations would be of a personal nature, commenting on the life experiences of the individual. There were also times, however, when the unconscious might deliver a message to the conscious mind that addressed collective issues and events. It is often difficult to distinguish which revelations contain an individual message and which are of collective import. Even if these two types can be differentiated, the full meanings and ramifications of such ‘collective dreams’ are often known only after the fact. But there is still value in paying attention to these dream images, which in many cases presage something yet to come

A dream that seemingly includes knowledge about the future which cannot be inferred from actually available information is referred to as a precognitive dream. For example, you may dream of your friend being involved in a skiing accident, only to discover a week later that this has actually happened when your friend calls you to say they have broken their leg. Precognitive dreams have been reported throughout history; famous examples are the Pharaoh’s dream of seven fat and seven thin cows, and Bishop Lanyi’s dream of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the event that triggered World War I.

Most studies indicate that women report more precognitive dreams than men, while the frequency of precognitive dreaming declines with age.

Precognitive dreams tend to focus on the possibility of accidents or disaster. Though they are generally considered symbolic of psychological processes, some precognitive dreams and nightmares are intended as guidance or warnings on a very practical level. For example, if you were to dream about the brakes failing on your car, it might help to ponder whether you are figuratively having trouble ‘slowing yourself down’ in your life, however, it also wouldn’t hurt to check the actual brakes on your automobile in waking life. In the great majority of cases dreams about some kind of disaster or the death or murder of yourself or a loved one, warn of current behavior trends, courses of action, or decisions which may soon become detrimental unless you change them. There are however, extremely rare occasions when a dream occurs that does appear to accurately and inexplicably predict a future event; although this event may not always be about an important world event or news item and is more likely to be about normal every day events, such as who you might bump into on the way to work. How and why this occurs is unknown but if it does occur it could indicate potential psychic or clairvoyant ability in the dreamer.... The Element Encyclopedia

PROCESSING DREAMS

Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)... Strangest Dream Explanations

PROPHETIC DREAMS

Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)... Strangest Dream Explanations

PSYCHODRAMA AND DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In psychodrama there is no in­terpretation’ of a dream.

The dreamer unravels the meaning of the dream by acting it out with the help of others.

The dreamer acts the main role of him or herself, and directs the helpers in the other roles. In dramatising and exploring the dream in this way, the obvious as well as the hidden meaning, associations and emotions are made clear.

To finish, the dreamer is encouraged to take the dream forward, altering it to what feels more adequate and satisfying. This gives the person opportunity to express and enact what was absent in the dream, and provides release from recurring dreams, and catharsis where necessary. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

RECURRING DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

If we keep a record of our dreams it will soon become obvious that some of our dream themes, charac­ters or places recur again and again. These recurrences are of various types.

A cenain theme may have begun in childhood and continued throughout our life—either without change, or as a gradually changing series of dreams. It might be that the feature which recurs is a setting, perhaps a house we visit again and again, but the details differ. Sometimes a senes of such dreams begin after or dunng a particular event or phase of our life, such as puberty or marriage.

Example: ‘This dream has recurred over 30 years. There is a railway station, remote in a rural area, a central waiting room with platform going round all sides. On the platform mill hundreds of people, all men I think. They are all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I know I am among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there is a guard watching us. He is cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap is a red star. He carries a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realise they are all me. Each one has my face. I am looking at myself. Then I feel fear and terror (Anon.).

The theme of the dream can incorporate anxious emotions, such as the above example, or any aspect of experi­ence. One woman, an epileptic, reports a dream which is the same in every detail and occurs every night. In general such dreams recur because there are ways the dreamer habitually responds to their internal or external world. Because their attitude or response is unchanging, the dream which reflects it remains the same.

It is noticeable in those who explore their dreams using such techniques as described under dream pro­cessing that recurring themes disappear or change because the attitudes or habitual anxieties which gave rise to them have been met or transformed.

A recurring environment in a dream where the other fac­tors change is not the same. We use the same words over and over in speech, yet each sentence may be different.

The envi­ronment or character represents a particular aspect of oneself, but the different events which surround it show it in the changing process of our psychological growth. Where there is no such change, as in the examples above, it suggests an area of our mental emotional self is stuck in a habitual feeling state or response.

Some recurring dreams can be ‘stopped’ by simply receiv­ing information about them. One woman dreamt the same dream from childhood. She was walking past railings in the town she lived in as a child. She always woke in dread and perspiration from this dream. At 40 she told her sister about it.

The response was ‘Oh, that’s simple. Don’t you remember that when you were about four we were walking past those railings and we were set on by a bunch of boys. Then I said to them, ‘Don’t hurt us, our mother’s dead!” They left us alone, but you should have seen the look on your face.’ After realis­ing the dread was connected with the loss of her mother, the dream never recurred. Another woman who repeatedly dreamt of being in a tight and frightening place, found the dream never returned after she had connected it to being in the womb.

Recurring dreams, such as that of the railings, suggest that pan of the process underlying dreams is a self regulatory (homocostatic) one.

The dream process tries to present trou­blesome emotions or situations to the conscious mind of the dreamer to resolve the trauma or difficulty underlying the dream.

An obvious example of this is seen in the recurring nightmare of a young woman who felt a piece of cloth touch her face, and repeatedly woke her family with her screams. Her brother, tiring of this, one night woke her from her screams and made her talk about her feelings. His persistence gradually revealed that she associated the cloth with the burial shroud of her grandmother. This brought to the surface grief and feelings about death she had never allowed herself to feel before.

The nightmare never returned. See nightmares; dream processing. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

RECURRING DREAMS

Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)... Strangest Dream Explanations

RECURRING DREAMS

My Dream Interpretation

Recurring dreams can be highly useful and important to analyze. They happen for one of two reasons: (1) they reflect an unhealthy pattern that you have fallen into in real life, and they are trying to show you that your behaviour is not helping you be happy. Or, (2) they represent unresolved feelings, such as anger or sadness over a past situation that you have not healed from. In many recurring dreams, your sleeping self is trying to solve a problem - or confront an emotion - that you are unable to face in real life. Whatever the subject of your recurring dream is, you can be sure it is reflecting something in your current life situation, even if the dream takes you back in time. Use the Dream Dictionary to analyze the major symbols and events in your dream, to piece together its message. Think carefully about what in your life might be causing you continual stress or worry.... My Dream Interpretation

RECURRING DREAMS

The Premier in Dream Dictionary

Repetitive dreams are a clear message from our dreaming mind that we are stuck in a particular mind set or behavioural cycle.

• If a dream continues to repeat itself, it is worth exploring it’s meaning as it needs your conscious understanding and action in order to resolve something in your emotional make-up.

• Recurring dreams can be a trauma relieving response to the original event that triggered them.... The Premier in Dream Dictionary

RECURRING DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Recurring dreams often coincide with phases in your life and are particularly common when in transition from one life stage to another, or when you are forced to deal with a new and unknown situation. As such, they can be seen as signposts on your journey through life, providing signals about where you are heading and how you are feeling. By looking at the themes that feature in recurring dreams, you can then identify which part of your life is being indicated. Although some recurring dreams are associated with stress and trauma, when these dreams occur they offer a unique opportunity to understand what motivates you from the very deepest level. Some of the most common recurring dream themes that can occur at any life stage are as follows:... The Element Encyclopedia

RELATIONSHIP DREAMS AT DIFFERENT STAGES OF YOUR LIFE

The Element Encyclopedia

Dreams about relationships are extremely common. This is because the health and survival of your relationships is a primary goal for your unconscious; in your dreams it constantly reviews your relationship options, mulls things over and tries to identify what went wrong and how to do things better. It may also give you a glimpse of how different things might be if you married someone else, had an affair or got divorced.

Although the following dreams can occur at any stage of your life, you may find that the focus of your relationship dreams shifts during your lifespan. In your teenage years, dream scenarios in which you are suddenly thrown together with someone to whom you are attracted are very common. The goal of the dream is to help you determine if someone is or is not interested in you in waking life. By the mid-twenties, however, relationship dreams move beyond initial attraction and begin to explore who is or is not right for us. This is the time when strangers, celebrities and friends tend to appear as dream lovers and partners. You may find the images shocking but it is important to bear in mind that the images are unlikely to represent the real person and more likely to represent qualities that you are evaluating.

During your thirties and forties, romantic dreams focus on explanations for why relationships may have disappointed in the past and offer dreams that can show you what to go after or avoid in the future. Dreams in which your current partner or lover is unfaithful are extremely common at this time; it is as if your dreaming mind is urging you to pay attention to your relationship, and secure or safeguard what you have.

During your fifties and sixties, dreams shift their focus onto things you have learned to value in your life. Past and present partners become shorthand symbols for the quality or experience you had with them. For example, your first lover represents passion and excitement or the partner who was unfaithful represents someone who cannot be trusted. Although you may dream of people from your past, your dreaming mind is using them as symbols to refer to your current relationships. From your seventies onwards, dreams are more likely to zoom in on the very nature of love itself to help you gain a deeper understanding of love and affairs of the heart.... The Element Encyclopedia

RELIGION AND DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

REMEMBERING DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Considering that each of us has four or five periods of dreaming each night, most of our dreams are forgotten. But for people who observe family or friends regu­larly remembering a dream, and yet themselves are seldom if ever able to recall one, the question arises as to why such a wide divergence occurs.

There are many different reasons why dreams may be for­gotten.

The most obvious is that we do not give enough atten­tion to our dreaming process. When people become intrigued by what they might be dreaming, and develop a motivation to remember, they frequently start recalling several dreams a week. From this standpoint, the reason why some people have always remembered might be that they have always been ei­ther intrigued or anxious about their nightly dramas.

The way we rise in the morning has an effect upon this type of memory.

If our attention is immediately turned out­wards on waking, there is little hope of recalling a dream unless it has great power, as might a nightmare. Spending a few moments leaving our mind open to memory aids recall. Any visual, or even muscular activity, will fill consciousness with new and powerful impressions which might obliterate the subtler impressions of dreaming. Rorschach suggested not opening the eyes, and remaining physically still. Tests also showed that passage of time, even a few minutes, between dreaming and attempting to remember causes many dreams to fragment and be lost. So any attempts to remember need one to record the dream quickly, by speaking it to one’s bedmate, using a tape recorder by one’s bed, or writing it down.

Some dreams have rather misty or fragmentary imagery and theme, while others are clear, concise and dynamic. These latter are more easily remembered. There may be times when we sleep with longer periods of wakefulness, perhaps due to feeling cold, or uncomfonable in a strange bed, which cause us to remember as we are nearer consciousness. Be­cause dreams occur in cycles during the night, if something wakes us during a dream cycle the memory is easier, if only because less time has elapsed since occurrence. So another method of captunng a dream is to have one’s alarm gently sound prior to the time one usually wakes.

The last hour or so of sleep includes a long period of dreaming, so waking in this period with intent to remember can often capture the quarry.

Thereare also psychological reasons for forgetfulness. Dreams often deal with past areas of experience which we do not wish to remember, or would rather not be aware of.

If we find it difficult to feel emotions, or feel uncomfonable with them, it is highly likely we repress dream memory, as dreams have a base of high feelings. Experiments have shown that during dreaming our heartbeat, body movements and breath­ing frequently reflect intensified emotions. Also, research into what areas of the brain produce dreaming suggest that dreams may be from the ‘visceral brain’, which is largely non verbal.

If temperamentally we find feeling qualities a foreign lan­guage, connecting with a dream would need to be a learnt skill. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

SAW, WOOD SHAVINGS

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: Seeing or working with a saw: someone is out to humiliate or irritate you. Hearing someone use a saw: you are in need of a break—your nerves are irritated. Watching someone use a saw: somebody has disappeared and now you have to face the damage by yourself. Seeing a dull saw: you are working with inferior tools and won’t succeed. Seeing wood shavings: your work is creating useless “garbage.” See File.

Depth Psychology: The saw is a sign that you are overly critical and at times too cynical. Working with a saw: you need to solve conflicts and problems on your own.

The dream might also suggest you let go of a relationship. Sometimes the saw indicates sexual desires that call for attention.... Dreamers Dictionary

SCIENCE, SLEEP AND DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In 1937 through the use of the electroencephalograph (EEG) measuring tiny electrical brain impulses, Loomis and his associates discovered that the form of brainwaves changes with the onset of sleep.

The next leap forward in understanding came when Aserinsky and Kleitman found rapid eye movements (REM) in 1953. In 1957 the REM were linked with dreaming. This defined sleep into two differ­ent observable states, REM sleep, and NREM (non-rapid eye movement or non-rem) sleep. Within NREM three different stages have been identified. These are defined by the different EEG patterns of electrical activity in the brain. They are mea­sured by the height (amplitude) of the brain waves and fre­quency of up and down movement. There are also electrical changes occurring in the muscles (measured using an electro- myograph or EMG), and in movement of the eyeballs (mea­sured using an electro-oculograph or EOG).

While awake the height is low and frequency fast. As we relax prior to sleep the EEG shifts to what are called alpha waves, at 8 to 12 cps (cycles per second). Stage one of sleep is the transition between this drowsy state of alpha waves to sleeping, in which theta waves occur, at 3 to 7 cps. In this first stage we experience random images and thoughts. This lasts about 10 minutes, followed by stage two, in which ‘sleep spindles’ occur which have 12 to 14 cps on the EEG. These last from 1/2 to 2 seconds, with K complexes following, which are slow large EEG waves. About half our sleep period is spent in this second stage of sleep. Deep sleep is reached when our brain exhibits delta waves, with 1/2 to 2 cps.

After approximately an hour and a half from falling into deep sleep, an exciting change occurs. We return to level two and REM occur. Suddenly the brain is alert and active, though the person is asleep and difficult to wake. This level has been called paradoxical sleep because of this fact. Voluntary mus­cular activity is suppressed and the body is essentially paralysed. Morrison has pointed out that, although the brain is transmitting full muscular activity messages, these are usu­ally suppressed by an area of the brain in the pons. But bursts of short actions occur, such as rapid eyeball jerks, twitches of the muscles, changes in the size of the pupil, contractions in the middle ear, and erection of the penis. It may be that similar excitation occurs in the vagina. Also, autonomic storms’ occur dunng which large erratic changes occur in heart rate, blood pressure, breathing rate and in other auto­nomic nervous system functions. These are the changes ac­companying our dreams.

If we slept for eight hours, a typical pattern would be to pass into delta sleep, stay there for about 70 to 90 minutes, then return to stage two and dream for about five minutes. We then move back into delta sleep, stay for a short period and shift back to level two, but without dreaming, then back into level three.

The next return to stage two is longer, almost an hour, with a period of dreaming lasting about 19 minutes, and also a short period of return to waking. There is only one short period of return to stage three sleep which occurs nearly four hours after falling asleep. From there on we remain in level two sleep, with three or four lengthening periods of dreaming, and returns to brief wakefulness.

The average amount of body shifting is once every 15 minutes.

1- In undergoing 205 hours of sleep deprivation, four healthy males showed various physiological and psychological changes. Some of these were headache, lack of concentra­tion, hallucination, memory loss, tremor and, in some, paranoia. In all cases one night’s sleep restored normal functioning.

2- One in ten people who complain of excessive daytime drowsiness suffer from sleep apnoea, which is a stoppage of breathing while asleep.

3- A condition called narcolepsy causes sufferers to fall asleep at inappropriate times—while making love, walk­ing, playing tennis, working.

4- As we age we usually sleep less. Our REM sleep in partic­ular decreases sharply. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

SERIAL DREAMS

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

An unresolved problem or an incomplete event of destiny; when resolved, the dreams will cease... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

SHAVING

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are being shaved, portends that you will let imposters defraud you.

To shave yourself, foretells that you will govern your own business and dictate to your household, notwithstanding that the presence of a shrew may cause you quarrels.

If your face appears smooth, you will enjoy quiet, and your conduct will hot be questioned by your companions.

If old and rough, there will be many squalls or, the matrimonial sea.

If your razor is dull and pulls your face, you will give your friends cause to criticize your private life.

If your beard seems gray, you will be absolutely devoid of any sense of justice to those having claims upon you.

For a woman to see men shaving, foretells that her nature will become sullied by indulgence in gross pleasures.

If she dreams of being shaved, she will assume so much masculinity that men will turn from her in disgust. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

SHAVING

Islamic Dream Interpretation

Shaving one’s hair in a dream relates to one’s personal customs.

If he is used to have short hair and sees himselfshaving his head in a dream, it means that he will pay a fine as an atonement.

If he sees his head shaved in the summertime, and if he is used to doing so, it means benefits, comfort, or recovering from a migraine headache.

If one sees his hair shaved during the winter in a dream, it means difficulties, adversities, penalties, or a sickness. Shaving one’s head in a dream also means paying one’s dues, appeasement of one’s fears, and success in one’s life. Shorteningone’s hair in a dream also means appeasing his fears.

If one is suffering from depression and he sees his head shaved in a dream, it means an end to his trouble, or payment of his debts. It also means abasement, disgrace, deception, or death.

If a soldier sees his head shaved in a dream, it means that he will lose his strength and esteem. Ifone sees himself chipping his hair in bits in a dream, it means that he will lose people’s respect. Shaving one’s head in a dream for someone who does not usually shave it also may mean an affliction or an illness.

If a woman sees her head shaved in a dream, it means divorce, or the death of her husband.

If she sees her hair sheared in a dream, it means confinement to her house.

If she sees her husband giving her a beautiful haircut and talking to her affectionately in a dream, it means spiritual growth, delivering a trust, or paying one’s debts. Trimming women’s hair in a dream means inability to conceive children. Cutting one’s hair in a dream means losing one’s strength. Shaving half of one’s beard in a dream means losing one’s source of income and dignity. Plucking out one’s facial hair in a dream is worst than shaving it, and particularly when hair louses up one’s face or attractiveness. Nevertheless, plucking out one’s facial hair in a dream also could depict amelioration of one’s condition or look. Shaving one’s backside or abdomen in a dream means paying one’s debts. Shaving, clipping, or adjusting one’s moustache in a dream means lighteningone’s burdens, though it also could represent a mishap. Ifa rich person sees himselfshaving his pubic hair or using a depilatory agent for that purpose in a dream, it means the loss of his wealth, or it could mean that he has overpaid for a property he has just purchased.

If a poor person sees that, it means that he will become financially solvent. Ifone sees himself shaving it with a razor blade, it represents benefits from one’s spouse.

(Also see Beard)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

SHAVING

Christian Dream Symbols

To dream of shaving your legs or face may symbolize a desire to keep your appearance neat and clean at all times. Cutting yourself while shaving may symbolize anxiety associated with trying to groom yourself ... Christian Dream Symbols

SHAVING

Gypsy Dream Dictionary

To dream of shaving means you tend to be miserly.

To cut yourself while shaving means you are going to lose money through your unwillingness to speculate.... Gypsy Dream Dictionary

SHAVING

The Complete Dream Book

(See Beard), A man who dreams of shaving may expect to solve any problems which may have arisen in connection with his love affair.

A woman who dreams of shaving should look to her conduct in the company of the opposite sex.... The Complete Dream Book

SHAVING

The Complete Dream Book

It is an augury of a change of address, either of your home or business, if you dream of shaving any part of the body other than the face.... The Complete Dream Book

SHAVING

My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are shaving suggests you are making a small but life-changing decision. Some aspect of your daily routine is being altered.

To dream that someone else is shaving you, represents a loss of your independence. You are relying on others too much to get you through some difficult times. You need to build up your self-confidence and self-esteem.

If you see somebody else shaving in your dream, there is some conflict in your self-image. Perhaps the face you portray to others does not match who you really are inside. Also see “Shaving Cream”.... My Dream Interpretation

SHAVING

The Big Dictionary of Dreams

Dreaming of a shaved person means that, in real life, you strive to make a nice impression.

Shaving oneself represents the oneiric prediction of a major economic loss; shaving another person indicates marital bliss.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

SHAVING

Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Removing unwanted hair is a ritual for both men and woman and is, for some, an essential element of personal grooming. For a man, facial hair is related to masculinity, so there is a symbolic element of softening that when shaving appears in a dream. For many men, the act of shaving is a grooming staple, and in this way shaving may indicate the preparation to present yourself in a way that suggests readiness and competency. For women, shaving the legs and underarms has connotations about the readiness for sexual intimacy, so in a dream such desires may be being expressed.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

SHAVING CREAM

My Dream Interpretation

To see or apply shaving cream in your dream represents the character and personality your portray to others in your waking life. It’s possible that you are trying to change your image to appear more like the person you believe yourself to be inside.... My Dream Interpretation

SHAVING OF THE HEAD

Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

interpreted upon 5 sides: pilgrimage, travel, glory, high standing, peace, on account of the AllMighty’s Saying: {[they are] shaving their heads and shortened, not afraid}. As for if he was from the people of the state / government then he will not be commended.... Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

SHAVING THE HEAD

Islamic Dream Interpretation

Dreaming of oneself as having shaved one’s head during the month of Hajj is a glad tiding that one will proceed for Hajj. But if such a dream is seen during any other month besides Hajj it means that his capital (in monetary terms) will become exhausted.

(This will be discussed in greater detail in this book).... Islamic Dream Interpretation

SHAVING THE HEAD

Islamic Dream Interpretation

If a person sees himself shaving the head in any month other than the Months of Hajj* or the Sacred Months**, either his capital will be lost or that of his employer’s; or he will lose his job.

If seen during the months of Hajj, it could only mean something good coming his way; perhaps he will proceed for Hajj.

*(Months of Hajj:Shawwaal, Zil-Qa’dah, Zil-Hijjah)

**(Sacred Months : Zil-Qa’dah, Zil-Hijjah, Muharram, Rajab)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

SHAVING, SHAVER, RAZOR

Dreamers Dictionary

Vision: If you are shaving: don’t let others talk you into something; people are playing games with you.

If someone else is shaving: deception is underfoot—someone is about to cheat you. Watching someone else shaving: don’t get involved in a questionable project.

Depth Psychology: A razor stands for a keen, logical, analytical mind (“razor sharp”). Sharp-edged logic, however, can quickly deflate feelings, emotions, and intuitive talents. You are walking on the razor’s edge. See Beard, Hair.... Dreamers Dictionary

SIGMUND FREUD ON DREAMS

Dreampedia

Sigmund Freud actually called dreams the “royal road to the unconscious,” That statement will probably remain true in psychology forever. Freud’s classic text, The Interpretation of Dreams, contains some of his finest work.

Freud believed every dream is a wish fulfillment, and he kept this theory to the end, even though he gave up his initial idea that all dreams have a sexual content.

For Freud, the concept of wish fulfillment didn’t necessarily imply that a pleasure was sought, because a person could just as well have a wish to be punished. Nevertheless, this idea of a “secret” wish being masked by a dream remains central to classical Freudian psychoanalysis.

Freud said, “Dreams are not comparable to the spontaneous sounds made by a musical instrument struck rather by some external force than by the hand of a performer; they are not meaningless, not absurd, they do not imply that one portion of our stockpile of ideas sleeps while another begins to awaken. They are a completely valid psychological phenomenon, specifically the fulfillment of wishes; they can be classified in the continuity of comprehensible waking mental states; they are constructed through highly complicated intellectual activity.”

It was not until Freud noticed how allowing his patients to freely associate ideas with whatever came to mind, that he really explored spontaneous abreaction. Freud himself suffered bouts of deep anxiety, and it was partly this that led him to explore the connection between association of ideas and dreams. In 1897 he wrote to his friend Wilhelm Fliess:

‘No matter what I start with, I always find myself back again with the neuroses and the psychical apparatus. Inside me there is a seething ferment, and I am only waiting for the next surge forward. I have felt impelled to start writing about dreams, with which I feel on firm ground.’

This move toward dreams may have come about because in allowing his patients freedom to talk and explore the associations that arose - free association - Freud noticed that patients would often find a connection between the direction of their associations and a dream they had experienced. The more he allowed his patients to go in their own direction, the more frequently they mentioned their dreams. Also, talking about the dream often enabled the patient to discover a new and productive chain of associations and memories.

Freud began to take note of his own dreams and explore the associations they aroused. In doing so he was the first person to consciously and consistently explore a dream into its depths through uncovering and following obvious and hidden associations and emotions connected with the dream imagery and drama.

Obviously previous dream researchers had noticed how the dream image associated with personal concerns, but Freud broke through into seeing the connection with sexual feelings, with early childhood trauma, and with the subtleties of the human psyche. He did this to deal with his own neurosis, and he says of this period, ‘I have been through some kind of neurotic experience, with odd states of mind not intelligible to consciousness, cloudy thoughts and veiled doubts, with barely here and there a ray of light.’

Using dreams for his self analysis, Freud discovered that previously unremembered details from his childhood were recaptured along with feelings and states of mind which he had never met before.

He wrote of this period, “Some sad secrets of life are being traced back to their first roots; the humble origins of much pride and precedence are being laid bare. I am now experiencing myself all the things that, as a third party, Ihave witnessed going on in my patients, days when I slink about depressed because I have understood nothing of the day’s dreams, fantasies, or mood.”

Without this powerful and personal experience of working with his dreams, meeting emotions and fantasies welling up from the unconscious, Freud would not have so passionately believed in his theories regarding dreams and the unconscious.

Of course, like much of Freud’s theories, he related dreams to sex. One of his basic views of dreams was that the purpose of dreams is to allow us to satisfy in fantasies the instinctual urges that society judges unacceptable such as sexual practices. This was partly the reason for the enormous opposition and criticism that he met.

During the period of his early life, only men were believed to have powerful sexual urges. When Freud showed that repressed but obvious sexual desires were equally at work in women this created a social uproar. Perhaps his second finding in regard to sexuality surprised even him. During his analysis of women patients, sexual advance or assault by the woman’s father was often revealed.

Freud struggled with this, wondering whether the assault was memory of an actual event, or a psychic reproduction of it. He eventually came to the conclusion that hysterical and neurotic behavior was often due to the trauma caused by an early sexual assault by the parent. Where there was not evidence of physical assault, then he saw the neurosis as due to sexual conflict or a trauma caused by some other event. This conflict was often manifested through dreams. This led to Freud being rejected by university colleagues, fellow doctors, and even by patients.

Another expert in the field of dreams and dream interpretation was Carl Jung.... Dreampedia

SOME COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT SEXUAL DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

If I make love to someone I know in my dream, does that mean he or she is interested in me? In most cases such dreams have more to do with your own feelings rather than hidden passions coming from other people. Remember your dreaming mind uses sexual imagery to give you a taste of how things might be different and teach you about love and passion.

Why do I dream of being intimate with people to whom I’m not attracted? There are several reasons for this.

If you honestly don’t find the person attractive in waking life, they may represent a quality or characteristic that is closely linked to a quality you are exploring or discovering within yourself.

If the partner is particularly unsavory, your dreaming mind may be encouraging you to say no to things that are not right for you.

Are dreams of my partner’s infidelity a warning sign? In some cases, yes, but in the majority of cases such dramas are metaphors for some kind of emotional abandonment or neglect; perhaps your loved one is showing more attention to the children—or to their job or hobbies—than to you.

Do repeated dreams of my first love mean I have not got over him or her? Your first love tends to be a symbol of romantic love in dreams but when they appear in your dreams, it is likely that your dreaming mind is using them as an emblem of love to help you work through your current relationship issues. In most cases, your dreaming mind is focused on current issues.

What do dreams of being back with my ex mean? Dreaming about your ex does not mean you want to be with them. Unless you are convinced that your latest ex is the ’one’, your dreaming mind is using them as an actor to represent your love interest. In most cases, such dreams suggest that you are going over old issues or relationship patterns, and that your dreaming mind is using such images to help you heal and move on to a more positive future. When any relationship breaks down, your dreaming mind will delve into memories, fears and hopes to help you unravel mysteries and gain understanding about what makes real love work. Your inner mind is constantly sorting through what works and what doesn’t work in a relationship, and it will refer back to past relationships to compare strengths and weaknesses and try to make sense of things.

If I have a perfect dream romance, does this mean the perfect partner will appear in my life? In you are single and you have a perfect romantic and sexual dream, this could be wish-fulfillment but it could also be your dreaming mind’s way of reminding you that love and passion are still out there and you should open yourself up to the possibility of romance.

If I have a bizarre or distressing dream about sex, does this mean I’m weird? Don’t interpret your dreaming according to how you judge it when you are awake, and try not to feel guilty. Instead, try to understand the dream and remind yourself that your dreaming mind will use sexual images—even graphic or shocking ones—as metaphors or opportunities to learn about yourself.... The Element Encyclopedia

SPIRITUAL OR MYSTICAL DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Tibetan Buddhists call these‘dreams of clarity’ because such dreams go beyond everyday situations and concerns into a space of‘the divine’. You may wake up from such a dream with a feeling of awe and unreality, knowing that something special and mystical has transpired.

The more you focus on the spiritual aspects of your waking life, the more likely it is that you will have a mystical, visionary or spiritual dream. The Tibetan dream yoga tradition, in common with other Eastern practices, encourages daily meditation and other self- awareness rituals to help clear the mind so that you may be open to receiving spiritual dreams during sleep.

Spiritual dreams are often categorized in several ways: Numinous dreams are dreams in which you can achieve practically anything, since you possess‘numen’, or divine power. Transpersonal dreams are those in which you go beyond personal concerns into a concern for the needs of all humanity. Transcendent and spiritual dreams are those in which you make contact with higher or divine knowledge; in such dreams, you might interact with angels, spirits, gurus or other divine messengers and learn profound lessons about ultimate human values, such as compassion, courage and selfdiscipline.

Scrooge’s dream in A Christmas Carol is a classic example of a spiritual dream. As was the case with Scrooge, a spiritual dream leaves you feeling inspired, motivated, filled with hope and at peace. Many dream experts believe that these special dreams have the ability to give your life new meaning and offer a higher perspective on life in general. Spiritual dreams stand out and are rarely forgotten. It is not uncommon to glean incredible insight from this type of dream, information that assists you in various areas throughout the rest of your life. Spiritual dreams are most likely to occur during the following periods in your life:

1. Before a significant change.

2. Before or during a shift in your perception about yourself and your life.

3. After a commitment to something meaningful has been expressed and is genuinely being pursued.

4. Following a major loss or change.

5. When becoming more aware of yourself, your circumstances, your life.

6. During emotional and spiritual breakthroughs, such as taking a class, attending therapy, practicing yoga or meditation.

7. During a recovery process.... The Element Encyclopedia

STRENGTH OF ONE'S DREAMS

Dreampedia

The meaning of a dream is stronger when seen at dawn, or during an afternoon nap, or when fruits are ripening on their trees, or at the time of harvest, or when one's star is in the rising position, or at a time when one is intending to sign a business contract, or if one is thinking of getting married, or at the term of a decade, etcetera. Seeing a dream during a daylight nap is also stronger than seeing it at night. On the other hand, the meaning of a dream becomes weaker and less plausible when seen during the wintertime.

The dream of a righteous ruler or governor is considered to be an inspiration from God Almighty. The dreams of community leaders depend on their beliefs. The dreams of servants come true for their employers. Women's dreams may materialize faster than those of men. Sinners' dreams are a proof against them on the day of judgement, unless they repent before their death. The dreams of rich people are stronger than those of poor people. The dreams of rich people materialize faster than those of poor people. The dreams of poor people are slower when they connote benefits and faster when they connote adversities. Because of their innocence, the dreams of little children are truer than those of teenagers. This is because older children may be busy in their mischief and fulfilling their newly discovered desires. The dream of a drunk person has no ground. Shaikh Al-Karamani explains that "the dream of a scholar is truer than that of an ignorant person, the dream of a chaste person is truer than that of an unchaste person, the dream of a good person is truer than that of a bad person, and that the dream of an elderly person is truer than that of a younger person."

The meaning of a dream also varies depending on how people look in it, their dress, type of work they perform, status, or religion. To someone, the dream may mean glad tiding and mercy, while the same dream could mean the opposite for another person. One may wonder when he receives a gift in a dream, then the same gift reaches him in in wakefulness, or if he suffers an adversity in a dream, then the same adversity takes place in wakefulness. Another person may be promoted in his dream, then the same is conferred on him in wakefulness, or if one sees himself performing his pilgrimage to Mecca in a dream, then he joins the pilgrims' caravan in wakefulness or if one sees someone visiting him in a dream, then the same person arrives in wakefulness, days or hours later.

Finally, in pursuing what we have earlier explained, the elements of a dream are interpreted on the basis of three categories: 1- kind, such as trees, lions, or birds, etcetera, and; 2- specimen, such as the type and name of that tree (e.g. a conifer, a spruce, or a maple tree, etcetera), or what type of bird (e.g. a magpie, a pewee, or a condor, etcetera); and 3- characteristics, such as the nature, or inherent characteristics of a lion, a cat, a crocodile, or their habitat, etcetera.... Dreampedia

SUN SIGNS AND DREAMS

Dreampedia

The Sun signs of astrology can appear in dreams, through the following correspondences: See also SPACE AND SCIENCE.

Aries

  • (21 March-19 April) is the cardinal fire sign, and is dynamic and action oriented. Associated with: soldiers, angry people, athletes; the ram; the owl; Mars; red; tiger lily; ruby; number one; head, brain, eyes, face, teeth; and typical dreams might be set in stadiums or battlefields. The best-known symbol for this first sign of the Zodiac in Western astrology is the ram, the ruling planet is Mars. Aries is influenced by the fire element. People born under the sign of Aries tend to be enterprising, impulsive, warm-hearted and confident free spirits who say what they mean and mean what they say, but they can also be impatient, rash, tactless, excitable and bossy.

Taurus

  • (20 April-20 May) is the fixed earth sign, and is solid, dependable and sensual. Associated with: singers, lovers, gardeners, models; the bull; Venus; red-orange; mallow; topaz; number two; the neck area, voice, ears, thyroid and cerebellum; and dreams set in a luxurious home or a beautiful setting. The best-known symbol of Taurus is the bull and the ruling planet is Venus. Taureans are influenced by the earth element. Those born under the sign of Taurus are persistent, reliable, loyal and patient individuals with a discriminating taste for quality and the good things in life. The downside is that they can at times be lazy, materialistic and moody.

Gemini

  • (21 May-21 June) is the mutable air sign, and is changeable, social and a coordinator. Associated with: teachers, talkers, writers, twins; magpies; orange; Mercury; orchid; tourmaline; number three; arms, hands, shoulders, lungs, thymus, nervous system, speech; and typical dream settings might be high-up places. The twins are the best-known symbol for Gemini and the ruling planet is Mercury. Geminis are influenced by the air element. Those born under Gemini are intellectual, natural communicators but they can also be inconsistent and flighty at times. Their endearing zest for ideas and something new sometimes makes committing to anyone and anything problematic.

Cancer

  • (22 June-22 July) is the cardinal water sign, and is shy, self- protective and nurturing. Associated with: chefs, mothers, carers; crab; turtle; Moon; yellow-orange; lotus; amber; moonstone; number four; stomach, esophagus, pancreas, breasts, womb, ribs, digestive system; and a typical dream setting is of a cottage by the sea. The best-known symbol for Cancer is the crab and the ruling planet is the Moon. Cancerians are influenced by the water element. Those born under Cancer tend to be emotional and empathetic with a wacky sense of humor, but they can be oversensitive and insecure at times.

Leo

  • (23 July-22 August) is the fixed fire sign, and is outgoing, an entertainer and warm. Associated with: actors, salespeople, motivational speakers; lion; Sun; yellow; Sunflower; cat’s eye; number five; the heart, spinal cord, circulation, spleen, pulse; and a typical dream setting is a stage. The best-known symbol for Leo is the lion and the ruling planet is the Sun. Leo is influenced by the fire element. Those born under Leo tend to be courageous, vivacious, energetic and natural leaders but they can also be prone to arrogance and be attention seeking.

Virgo

  • (23 August-22 September) is the mutable earth sign, and is reserved, particular and intelligent. Associated with: dieticians, auditors, priestesses; virgin; Mercury; yellow-green; narcissus; peridot; number six; assimilation, food and diet, intestines, bowels, nails; and dream surroundings that are orderly and neat. The best-known symbol of Virgo is the virgin and the ruling planet is Mercury. Virgos are influenced by the earth element. Those born under Virgo tend to be meticulous, disciplined and analytical. They can appear cool and reserved, but great sensitivity lies behind the detached exterior.

Libra

  • (23 September-23 October) is the cardinal air sign, and is elegant, refined and cultured. Associated with: princes or princesses, artists, musicians; scales; elephant; Venus; green; aloe; emerald; number seven; adrenals, kidneys, lumbar region, skin; and the ideal dream landscape is a rose garden. The scales are the best- known symbol of Libra and the ruling planet is Venus. Librans are influenced by the air element. Those born under Libra tend to be peace-loving, agreeable, harmonious people but their natural ability to understand the viewpoint of everyone and fit in everywhere can be interpreted as insecurity and indecisiveness.

Scorpio

  • (24 October-21 November) is the fixed water sign, and is introverted, intense, and magnetic. Associated with: Grim Reaper; dark figures, exotic people; scorpion; eagle; phoenix; Mars; Pluto; blue-green; cactus; turquoise; number eight; bladder, genitals, colon, prostate, uterus, sex organs; and a typical dream setting would be a bedroom. The best-known symbol of Scorpio is the scorpion and the ruling planets are Mars and Pluto. Scorpios are influenced by the water element. Those born under Scorpio tend to be passionate, focused, sensitive and sensual, but they can also be secretive and destructive.

Sagittarius

  • (22 November—21 December) is the mutable fire sign, and is adventurous, curious and wise. Associated with: hunters, horseback riders, explorers; archery; Centaur; Jupiter; blue; rush; jacinth; number nine; hips, thighs, arteries, base of spine, pelvis; and a typical dream setting would be scenes around a campfire. The best-known symbol for Sagittarius is the archer and the ruling planet is Jupiter. Sagittarians are influenced by the fire element. Those born under Sagittarius tend to be unconventional, idealistic and visionary with a need to seek spiritual enlightenment, but they can also be reckless and ruthless.

Capricorn

  • (22 December-19 January) is the cardinal earth sign, and is conservative, organized and determined. Associated with: mountain climbers, accountants, bankers; mountain goat; Saturn; indigo; hemp; jet; number ten; bones, skeleton, joints, cartilage; and a dream setting might be an old house at the top of a hill. The best- known symbol of Capricorn is the goat and the ruling planet is Saturn. Capricorns are influenced by the earth element. Those born under the sign of Capricorn are persistent, cautious, self-disciplined, warmhearted and stable, but they can also at times be mean and inflexible.

Aquarius

  • (20 January-18 February) is the fixed air sign, and is humanitarian, unique and interesting. Associated with electricians, conductors, Eskimos; water bearer; man; star; Uranus; violet; olive; chalcedony; number eleven, ankles, calves, circulation, breath, eyesight; and a dream setting might be a cold place or planet. The best-known symbol of Aquarius is the water carrier and the ruling planets are Saturn and Uranus. Aquarius is influenced by the air element. Those born under the sign of Aquarius tend to be idealistic, intellectual, generous, altruistic and unconventional, but they can also be unpredictable and emotionally detached at times.

Pisces

  • (19 February-20 March) is the mutable water sign, and is dreamy, imaginative and otherworldly. Associated with: religious teachers, monks and nuns, photographers; fish; dolphin; Neptune; red-violet; poppy; pearl; number twelve; feet, toes, lymph glands; and a typical dream setting might be a cathedral. The best-known symbol of Pisces is two fish and the ruling planets are Jupiter and Neptune. Pisceans are influenced by the water element. Those born under the sign of Pisces tend to be intuitive, sensitive and spiritual but they can also be dreamy, impractical and impressionable at times.
... Dreampedia

SUPERNATURAL DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

There is a long tradition in almost every religion of dreams with messages from a supernatural power. Many people are inclined to accept that dreams containing religious symbols, such as the Cross, Star or Crescent Moon, or leaders of their faith, such as Christ, Buddha, Muhammed or Moses, appear as direct instructions from that power.

If you have been brought up in a particular faith, it is most likely that such dreams are instructing you to act in accordance with the moral standards of that faith. They may also be urging you to regard some waking problem in the light of your religious beliefs. A dream of a religious symbol may therefore be suggesting that a part of your life needs moral, as well as practical, attention. A dream featuring a religious leader tends to occur when there is an important moral decision to be made in your waking life. See also RELIGION.... The Element Encyclopedia

SURREAL DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Most dreams have an element of fantasy or the surreal in them, but when the events or images in your dream are so fantastic or have absolutely nothing to do with your waking reality, how do you interpret them? The first step would be to try to understand them literally. For example, if you dream that a wrist-watch is melting on your hand, are you making the best use of your time? If you dream of having eyes In the back of your head, do you need to watch your back in waking life?

If it simply isn’t possible to interpret your dream this way, the next step would be to sit down with a pen and paper, think of your dream and begin to doodle. In some cases, the symbols that flow from your pen may relate to your dream or provide a point from which you can interpret it.

If this still doesn’t help, you can of course just let the dream go, but if the dream continues to nag at you, it is likely that it had something important to say. Many dream psychologists believe that there is no such thing as a meaningless dream, so if the images in your dream were so fantastic you simply can’t make sense of them, the following technique may help. Just before you go to sleep on the night after having a surreal dream, try to recall the symbols you had difficulty understanding; it is often the case that the dream you will have on this second night will contain the same message as the first dream, but perhaps expressed in symbols that are easier to comprehend. This technique is applicable with any difficult dream, not just dreams that contain elements of the fantastic or the surreal.... The Element Encyclopedia

SWEET DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

To encourage joyful dreams, some dream experts suggest that you do some visualization exercises during the day. For example, you may want to look for flying objects during the day, such as leaves, insects, seeds, birds or kites and then try to imagine what the world looks like from their perspective. How would it feel and what would the earth look like? Another exercise to do during the day would be to imagine or picture in your mind a dream that takes you on an exciting or joyous adventure.

If you do have happy, joyful dreams during the night remember how they feel and try to take some guidance from the dream.... The Element Encyclopedia

TELEPATHIC MESSAGES IN DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

There is one form of communication that requires no paper, pen, computer or phone: thought transference or telepathy. Although the jury is still out as to whether telepathy is a real phenomenon or not, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence to suggest that it is; you may have experienced it yourself in dreams. For example, if you had a dream of your much-loved cousin being badly injured in a car crash, and then woke to receive news that he had been involved in such a car crash during the night, your cousin may have communicated his pain telepathically to you. In most cases, telepathy is thought to occur between two people who have a very close or empathetic relationship and the sender may often be unaware of transmitting their emotions to the receiver. The most common published accounts of telepathy and ESP are between lovers or family members, and focus on a life-threatening injury or death. Psychics believe these people are able to tune into each other’s frequencies as they are so close to each other emotionally; a twin brother, for example, will sense the pain of his twin sister. In times of crisis, we send out our message and those who are in tune will pick it up.

Another example of dream telepathy is called shared dreaming, in which people try to meet up with each other in dreamland or to dream of the same landscape.... The Element Encyclopedia

TELEPATHY IN DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

You may experience dreams in which you pick up emotions or experience the same situations as others. For example, you dream of a loved one being rushed to hospital only to find in the morning that this is in fact the case and your father has had a stroke. In most cases, telepathic dreams occur between people who are close to each other; for example between family members, married couples or close friends. These dreams will be generally be for and about you; but if you really do not think this is the case, keep your mind open to the possibility that you may have been picking up sensations or feelings from loved ones.

If you are an empathic or sensitive person and know you are prone to such dreams, you can easily recognize them to avoid confusion.... The Element Encyclopedia

THE HOWS, WHYS AND WHATS OF SLEEP AND DREAMS

Dreampedia

‘Sleep is the balm for hurt minds, nature’s great second course.’
William Shakespeare

Sleep is absolutely crucial for our physical, mental and emotional health and well-being. It is during sleep that we abandon conscious control of our physical body and the unconscious mind is allowed to roam free, giving rise to dreams.

Although we now know a lot more about dreams, their real purpose isn’t yet fully understood. It wasn’t until we approached the middle of the twentieth century, with the first electronic monitoring of the brain, that we began to get a clearer idea of the nocturnal adventures of the mind. For centuries it was thought that the purpose of sleep was to rest the body and the mind, but this reasoning was disproved when it was shown that both the body and mind are active during sleep. If sleep doesn’t rest the body or mind, then what is it for?

Sleep researchers may not yet have discovered the exact reason for sleep or dreams but they have discovered some fascinating things. For example, it seems that when we are asleep our brains are a bit like computers that are offline. This J. August Strindberg means they are not idle but are filing and updating the day’s activities. They take stock of your body and release a growth hormone to repair damaged tissues and stimulate growth, while the immune system gets to work on attacking any viral or bacterial infections that may be present. Some experts believe the brain also jettisons trivial information during sleep to prevent it becoming overburdened with unimportant information, but this explanation is perhaps too simplistic, as no memory can be totally eradicated.

The advent of space travel gave scientists the opportunity to prove that resting the body was not the main function of sleep. What they found instead was that prolonged periods of isolation decreased the need for sleep. In other words, the fewer stimuli received from people or external contacts during the day, the less sleep was required. It seems we have a sleep control center at the base of our brain linked with activity during wakefulness. When that gets overloaded we get tired, but if there have not been enough stimuli from the outside world, the sleep mechanism isn’t triggered. It seems, therefore, that boredom and lack of stimuli may account for many cases of insomnia. (Paradoxically, overstimulation also produces insomnia.)... Dreampedia

THE SCIENCE OF DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

We typically spend more than two hours each night dreaming but there is much that scientists do not know about how or why we dream.

Freud, who greatly influenced the field of psychology, believed dreaming to be a ’safety valve’ for unconscious desires, but it was not until the 1950s that scientists were able to study sleep and dreaming and come to some of their own conclusions.

In 1953, Eugene Aserinsky of the University of Chicago noticed that the eyes of sleeping babies moved beneath their eyelids at certain regular intervals. This led to the discovery of REM (rapid eye movement) sleep periods, which occur at roughly sixty to ninety minute intervals throughout the night, and contain the dreams that are the most vivid and most often remembered. Since then, EEG recordings that monitor brain activity during sleep have been used to map the various stages of sleep. Scientists soon realized that the strange, illogical experiences we call dreams almost always occur during REM sleep. Whilst most mammals and birds show signs of REM sleep, reptiles and other cold-blooded animals do not. REM sleep begins with signals from an area at the base of the brain called the pons. These signals travel to a brain region called the thalamus, which relays them to the cerebral cortex—the outer layer of the brain that is responsible for learning, thinking and organizing information. The pons also sends signals that shut off neurons in the spinal cord, causing temporary paralysis of the limb muscles.

If something interferes with this paralysis, people will begin to physically ’act out’ their dreams—a rare, dangerous problem called REM sleep behavior disorder.

REM sleep stimulates the brain regions used in learning. This may be important for normal brain development during infancy, which would explain why infants spend much more time in REM sleep than adults.

Like deep sleep, REM sleep is associated with an increased production of proteins. One study found that REM sleep affects the learning of certain mental skills. People taught a skill and then deprived of non-REM sleep could recall what they had learned after sleeping, whilst people deprived of REM sleep could not.

Some scientists believe dreams are the cortex’s attempt to find meaning in the random signals that it receives during REM sleep. The cortex is the part of the brain that interprets and organizes information from the environment during consciousness. It may be that, given random signals from the pons during REM sleep, the cortex tries to interpret these signals as well, creating a ’story’ out of fragmented brain activity.... The Element Encyclopedia

THE TEN MOST COMMON DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Anthropologists, psychologists and dream analysts often find similar themes in dreams that appear to transcend all generations and cultures. Whilst not all experts agree on the same list and frequency, the list below is representative of what are generally accepted as common dream themes. You’ll notice that both fantasy and contemporary scenarios appear in the list, and when it comes to interpretation, both the surreal and the everyday can be rich sources of symbolism.

1. Being chased or attacked

Many people dream of being pursued or attacked, although who or what is attacking or doing the pursuing varies from place to place. These dreams are a natural response to life stress; it could be that events are catching up with you or perhaps you trying to run away from something.

2. Being lost or trapped

In these very common dreams, you’re lost and feeling desperate. You may be buried alive or locked in a cage. You dream of not being able to move; you’re powerless to scream or breathe. Or you may feel desperate for the toilet and unable to find one. These dreams may occur when you feel confusion or conflict about how to act in waking life.

3. Being injured, ill or dying

Such dreams may involve deaths of famous people, your parents or children, a lover and even yourself. When you dream about an accidental death of any person, that person’s death symbolizes something in you that is no longer functioning. It can also suggest new beginnings; out with the old and in with the new. Another common scenario under this theme is of teeth falling out or crumbling. This might have a physical origin in people gritting or grinding teeth during sleep. Freud suggested that dreams of teeth falling out are related to fears of castration, but women have this dream as often as men. Other psychologists believe the dream reflects anxiety about your appearance and how others perceive you.

4. Car or other vehicle trouble

An out-of-control vehicle is a fairly common nightmare among all people and ages, whether or not the dreamers actually drive. Such a dream may occur when the dreamer feels events in waking life are out of control.

5. House or property, loss or damage

In these dreams, your house is damaged or destroyed by fire, water or other causes. These dreams may surface because you feel that some valuable aspect of waking life is at risk. Dreams about losing a wallet, watch or cherished piece of jewelry, such as a wedding ring, also fall into this category. Meanings vary depending on what is lost or damaged. The flip side of this is that dreams about discovering new spaces or rooms in your home, or dreams about repairs or improvements are also common. These dreams may occur when you feel that some valuable aspect of waking life is improving.

6. Poor test or other poor performance

You’ve probably dreamed of arriving for a test and found the exam has already started. Or you search fruitlessly for the examination room.

This is a common dream that can occur years after school or college; it usually occurs when you feel you are somehow being ‘tested’ in waking life. Some psychologists think the dreams can denote anxiety about sexual performance.

7. Falling or flying?

Falling is one of the most common dreams among people of all ages, and may be a reflection of feeling insecure, helpless or of having no support or solid grounding. Some people may actually fall from their beds during this dream. Dreaming about drowning is less common, and often occurs when a person feels overwhelmed. Dreams about flying, swimming or dancing are the flip side of falling or drowning dreams. Such optimistic dreams inspire, as the dreamer is lifted to spiritual heights or is filled with creative notions. Pleasurable swimming may mean freely exploring your depths; dreams of dance may be a metaphor for moving freely through your life.

8. Being naked in public or inappropriately dressed.

This is a common dream scenario that occurs at all ages, even with children. The dreams involve feelings of exposure and vulnerability, and often include an element of embarrassment or shame. On the other hand, dreams of wearing a special outfit may suggest you feel good about your body or your life.

9. Missing the train or connection

You rush to catch a departing bus, train, airplane or ship, only to find it has left without you. These dreams reflect feelings that you are missing out on something in waking life. Machine or telephone malfunction dreams are another variation on this theme, often occurring when you feel anxious about making an emotional connection or when you feel you’re losing touch with someone.

10. Natural or man-made disasters

You’re confronted with overwhelming floods, tidal waves, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tornadoes, hurricanes, bombings or chemical warfare. These dreams may depict personal problems raging out of control. Dreams of vibrant flowers, verdant hillsides or uplifting music that leaves the dreamer feeling inspired are the flip side of disaster dreams.... The Element Encyclopedia

TIMES IN WHICH DREAMS ARE MOST POTENT

Islamic Dream Interpretation

It must be borne in mind that the most authentic dreams are the ones observed in the latter part of the night and during Qayloolah (sleeping at midday ) and during the day. Dreams during the fruit-ripening season and fruit-selling season are also very potent.

The most inopportune time wherein dreams hardly have any significant meaning is during the winter season and when rain is imminent.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

TIMES IN WHICH DREAMS ARE MOST POTENT

Islamic Dream Interpretation

It must be borne in mind that the most authentic dreams are the ones observed in the latter part of the night and during Qayloolah (sleeping at midday ) and during the day. Dreams during the fruit-ripening season and fruit-selling season are also very potent.

The most inopportune time wherein dreams hardly have any significant meaning is during the winter season and when rain is imminent.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

TYPES OF DREAMS

Dreampedia

Daydreams
Studies show that we all have the tendency to daydream an average of 70-120 minutes a day. Day dreaming is classified as a level of consciousness between sleep and wakefulness. It occurs during our waking hours when we let our imagination carry us away. As our minds begin to wander and our level of awareness decreases, we lose ourselves in our imagined scenario and fantasy.

Lucid Dreams
Lucid dreams occur when you realize you are dreaming. “Wait a second. This is only a dream!” Most dreamers wake themselves up once they realize that they are only dreaming. Other dreamers have cultivated the skill to remain in the lucid state of dreaming. They become an active participant in their own dreams, making decisions in their dreams and influencing the dream’s outcome without awakening.

Nightmares
A nightmare is a disturbing dream that causes the dreamer to wake up feeling anxious and frightened. Nightmares may be a response to real life trauma and situations. This type of nightmare falls under a special category called Post-traumatic Stress Nightmare (PSN).

Nightmares may also occur because we have ignored or refused to accept a particular life situation. Research shows that most people who have regular nightmares have had a family history of psychiatric problems, bad drug experiences, people who have contemplated suicide, and/or rocky relationships.

Nightmares are an indication of a fear that needs to be acknowledged and confronted. It is a way for our subconscious to make up take notice. “Pay attention!” We’ll have more later in the book about nightmares and steps you can take to overcome them.

Recurring Dreams
Recurring dreams repeat themselves with little variation in story or theme. These dreams may be positive, but most often they are nightmarish in content. Dreams may recur because a conflict depicted in the dream remains unresolved or ignored. Once you have found a resolution to the problem, your recurring dreams will cease.

Healing Dreams
Healing dreams serve as messages for the dreamer in regards to their health. Many dream experts believe that dreams can help us avoid potential health problems and help us to heal when we are ill. Our bodies are able to communicate to us through our dreams to “tell” us that something is not quite right with our bodies even before any physical symptoms show up. Dreams of this nature may be telling the dreamer that he/she needs to go to the dentist or doctor

Prophetic Dreams
Prophetic dreams also referred to as precognitive or psychic dreams are dreams that seemingly foretell the future. One rational theory to explain this phenomenon is that our dreaming mind is able to piece together bits of information and observation that we normally overlook or that we do not seriously consider. In other words, our unconscious mind knows what is coming before we consciously piece together the same information.

Signal Dreams
Signal dreams help you how to solve problems or make decisions in your waking life.

Epic Dreams
Epic dreams (or Great dreams) are so huge, so compelling, and so vivid that you cannot ignore them. The details of such dreams remain with you for years, as if your dreamt it last night. These dreams possess much beauty and contain many archetypal symbology. When you wake up from such a dream, you feel that you have discovered something profound or amazing about yourself or about the world. It feels like a life-changing experience

You might be wondering what exactly is going on in your head when you dream.... Dreampedia

TYPICAL DREAMS OF LATER LIFE

The Element Encyclopedia

Dreams in later life can be extremely tense and memorable; two of the most common are dreams of losing your purse or wallet and dreams of getting lost. The former dream reflects frustration and anxiety, and the experience of change as loss and threat. The latter is about trying to find your way through a situation that seems unfamiliar. In this second dream you typically find yourself in a strange neighborhood and, if you do stop to ask for directions, people give you the wrong ones. This dream represents a situation that is unfamiliar; the advice of others is not only unhelpful, it can actually make matters more confusing. The dream is reminding you that the more closely you follow your instincts or intuition, the easier it will be to find your way home or have self-knowledge.

The Final Stage... The Element Encyclopedia

TYPICAL TEENAGE DREAMS

The Element Encyclopedia

Although the following dreams can be experienced at any life stage, they are believed to be amongst the most common for teenage dreamers.

If you dream of burying a dead body, you may be aware that you have killed someone, although you may not remember why or how. Your concern in the dream is to bury the body before someone makes a terrifying discovery and exposes you. Despite the horror of what you have done, the main issue in your dream is not the fact that you have killed someone but your desire to cover your tracks and avoid discovery. The dream is all about your need for acceptance and to rid yourself of things that are undesirable in your life. The person you have murdered represents what you would like to get rid of; that is why there is no remorse in the dream and the panic in the dream indicates your fear that people will recognize your anxiety. The teenage years are all about deciding what is or is not acceptable or desirable in your life so, not surprisingly, this dream is most common at that particular time. The things you want to bury can include parental expectation, childish hobbies or activities and so on.

During your teenage years you are very likely to dream of meeting a celebrity and becoming their close friend. This kind of dream focuses on the importance of feeling accepted and admired within your peer group. It is not uncommon for a teenager to dream about the death or funeral of one or both parents. Such dreams are not predictive, being simple reflections of the death of the past and the beginning of a new parent-child relationship.... The Element Encyclopedia

UNLOCKING THE POWER OF YOUR DREAMS

Dreampedia

Dream interpretation provides powerful knowledge about yourself that you might not discover otherwise, if you can understand the language of dream symbols. Encoded within dream symbolism you can find clues to what makes you tick, answers that point you toward your ideal life, and insights to help you resolve past issues and move through the challenges ahead. In fact, dream symbolism is so potent that sometimes translating just one dream symbol can unlock the meaning of an entire life transforming dream. This book teaches you how to translate dream symbol meaning and use it as the key to unlock the power of your dreams.

A Practical Goal
The practical goal of dream interpretation, as I see it, is to find the value in each dream so you can then apply it to improve yourself and your life. A dream’s value may be profound and life changing, or as simple as the realization that eating sweets too close to bedtime can trigger nightmares. Whatever the content of a dream, you can learn from it. So as you explore your dreams, keep the following objective in mind:

Find the value in your dreams.

  • The Value in Dreams
  • Virtually every dream offers value, revealing some new understanding about yourself or your life. If you pay attention to your dreams, they can help you:
  • Better understand yourself and your needs.
  • Get answers to important questions.
  • Clarify life purpose and direction.
  • Discover creative ideas and visions.
  • Help resolve issues from the past.
  • Resolve fears and move ahead.
  • Identify important health conditions.
  • Learn how to reduce stress in your life.”

Quotation: Nancy Wagaman. “The Curious Dreamer’s Dream Dictionary”... Dreampedia

VENTING DREAMS

Strangest Dream Explanations

Venting dreams represent your subconscious mind’s attempt to assist you with the process of cleaning out the old in order to make room for the new. You may be playing out a a frightening or anxiety provoking scenario in order to come to terms with how you would handle it, or to conquer it. Venting dreams usually occur as nightmares or frightmares, anxiety dreams that leave you feeling shaken up. Venting dreams are showing you what we are ready to release. See Types of Dreams (Introduction).... Strangest Dream Explanations

WHAT ARE DREAMS FOR?

Dreampedia

“Trust in dreams, for in them the gateway to eternity is hidden.”
KHALIL GIBRAN

Dreams and their purpose
Consider dreams like home movies that each person produces in response to their daily experiences. These movies are meant to clarify certain situations and support the person. With sufficient knowledge, they can become a sort of spiritual guide, since oneiric thoughts are a window to the subconscious where, frequently, hidden feelings and repressed needs are stored without us realizing.

Even then, there are people who question the importance of dreams. Some scientists, for example, believe that the content of dreams is simply a random mix of the many electronic signals the brain receives. Others, however, find all types of messages in even the simplest dreams, and end up distancing themselves from daily reality in favor of oneiric activity.

Neither extreme is advisable. Each dream is undoubtedly a journey into the unknown, but, at the same time, modern psychology has allowed us to understand a good part of their structure. One of the conclusions drawn from the study of dreams confirms this: dreams can be a priceless aid to the imagination, but above all when it comes to solving problems. You just have to know how to listen to them, because their content tends to have a direct relation to the emotional challenges you are experiencing.

Each dream is a journey to the unknown with an implicit personal message. Although it is the content of the episode that determines our emotional state, dreaming in black and white indicates a possible lack of enthusiasm or nostalgia for the past. These dreams are an invitation to live with more intensity and enjoy the present.

Still from the film Viaje a la Luna (Méliès, 1902).

It is known that in times of crisis, our oneiric production increases significantly, both in quantity and intensity. Should we consider this “surplus” to be positive? Yes, as long as one makes an effort to remember and interpret the dreams, since, as we will see further on, they have a valuable therapeutic potential.

For example, if a couple is going through a critical phase, remembering and analyzing usually helps them understand the subconscious reactions they have to the situation. In other words, dreams are an excellent tool to get to the bottom of emotional conflicts. Knowing the causes is an essential step to resolving the problems, regardless of what course you take.

The English psychologist David Fontana, whose books have been translated into more than twenty languages, said it clearly: “In listening to my patients’ dreams in therapy sessions, I have observed how, often, these can take us right to the root of the psychologic problem much quicker than other methods.” Although, we shouldn’t fool ourselves: dreams are a mystery that can rarely decipher everything. But if a certain level of interpretation helps us understand ourselves better, what more can we ask for? From a practical point of view, our own oneiric material can be very useful.

In dreams, relationships with others are a recurring theme. The people that appear in our dreams, especially strangers, represent facets of ourselves that the subconscious is showing us.

Well-known writers such as Robert Louis Stevenson, William Blake, Edgar Allan Poe, and Woody Allen have had faith in this, acknowledging that part of their works have been inspired by dreams. The discoveries of Albert Einstein or Niels Bohr (father of modern atomic physics), among other celebrated scientists, had the same origin. In any case, these examples shouldn’t confuse us: no dream can tell you what path to follow through symbolic images without the intellect to decipher them.

Prosperity, precognition, and pronostics
What’s more, judging by some documented cases, we can even reap material gain from dreams. There is proof of some people that had premonitory dreams managing to earn significant sums of money thanks to their oneiric “magic.” The most spectacular case was in the fifties, when an Englishman named Harold Horwood won a considerable number of prizes betting on horses. His dreams transmitted clues as to the winning racehorse to bet on. Unfortunately, these types of premonitions don’t come to everyone. However, anyone has the opportunity to discover the greatest treasure of all—knowledge of one’s self—through their dreams.

We’ve all experienced the feeling of having lost control of our lives at some point. We might feel like others are deciding things for us or that we are victims of our circumstances.

Our “dream-scapes” contain valuable information about our desires and concerns; they could also function as a forecast of some aspect of our future. According to ancient tradition, dreaming of stars predicts prosperity and spiritual wealth. “Starry Night” (Van Gogh, 1889).

However, many psychologists disagree with this. That is, they argue that daily events are not coincidences but rather meaningful deeds that reflect the inner state of the individual.

Dreams and thoughts
According to these experts, luck is a pipe dream, something that does not exist, since that which we consider the result of coincidence is none other than the natural manifestation of our thoughts and attitudes. We are basically creator, not passive receivers or victims of the events that unravel in our lives.

An example that illustrates this idea perfectly is the story of the old man who threw rocks into the sea. One day, someone asked if he ever got bored of the simple game. The old pebble thrower stared at his questioner and gave an answer he’d never forget: “My small stones are more important than they seem, they provoke repercussions. They will help create waves that, sooner or later, will reach other other side of the ocean.”

What does this have to do with dreams? It’s simple: as we’ve just seen, we are the only ones responsible for our daily experiences, no matter how hard that is to believe. Therefore it shouldn’t be too difficult to take control of our lives; we just have to listen to the messages in our interior, that is, our oneiric thoughts, of which we are ultimately the authors.

Visualizations
In this way, thanks to dreams, our two existences—conscious and unconscious—can work together to make our lives more creative and free. An important part of this process is getting to know and understanding better the process of thought. One of the most beautiful and commonly used visualizations in yoga reminds us of this: “In the bottom of the lake of our thoughts is a jewel. In order for it to shine in the light of the sun (the divine), the water (the thoughts) must be pure and crystal clear and calm, free of waves (excitement). If our water is murky or choppy, others can’t see this jewel, our inner light...”

In the bottom of the lake of our thoughts is a jewel...

But it’s not that simple: it’s often difficult to discern the connection that unites wakefulness with sleep, between what we think ourselves to be and what our oneiric fantasies say about us. In any case, if our search is passionate and patient, constant and conscious, it will result in the discovery of our true Self. Therefore the interpretation of dreams cuts right to the heart of the message conceived by and for ourselves (although not consciously). It is important to learn to listen to them (further on we will discuss techniques for this) when it comes time to unstitch their meaning and extract the teachings that can enrich our lives.

The rooms in our dreams reflect unknown aspects of our personality.

In this way, when we have to make an important decision, we can clear up any doubts through a clear understanding of our most intimate desires. Although it may seem like common sense, this is not that common these days, since most people make decisions at random, out of habit, or by impulse.

The meaning and psychic effect of some deities in Tibetan Buddhism can be linked to the monsters that are so popular today.

Dreams allow creativity a free rein and free us from worry, sometimes resulting in surreal images that would be impossible in waking life.

Put simply, the idea is to find your true identity and recognize your wounds, fears, and joys through dreams. Never forget that the subconscious, although hidden, is an essential part of our personality. Dreams are fundamental for understanding the Self, since they are a direct path to this little-known part of ourselves. Their symbolic content allows us to recover repressed emotions and gives us a map to the relationships that surround us.

Nightmares that put us to the test
Sometimes the messages they bring us are not so pleasant and take the form of nightmares. However, although it may be hard to accept, these nightmares are valuable warnings that some aspects of our life are not

in harmony with our deepest Self and thus need our prompt intervention. Nightmares are proof that self discovery is not always pleasant. Sometimes it’s necessary to feel this pain in order to find out what you really are and need.

On the other hand, dreams give creativity a free rein because, when we sleep, we are free from our day-to-day worries. Therefore, even if you don’t consider yourself a creative person, keep in mind that all the scenes, symbols, and characters that appear in your dreams have been created solely and exclusively by you.

It’s often very helpful to record dreams in a notebook (we will explain how further on) in order to later analyze them and apply their teachings to daily life.

It is quite the paradox; the human being awakens their most intimate reality precisely when they are sleeping.

Carl Gustav Jung, who dedicated his life to studying dreams, developed this metaphor: “People live in mansions of which they only know the basements.” Only when our conscience is sleeping do we manage to unveil some of the rooms of our magnificent house: rooms that may be dusty and inhospitable and fill us with terror and anxiety, or magnificent rooms where we want to stay forever.

Given that they all belong to us, it is reasonable to want to discover them all. Dreams, in this sense, are a fundamental tool.

How to remember dreams
At this point, you’re probably thinking, “Sure, dreams are really important, but I can’t use them because I simply don’t remember them.” That’s not a problem, there are techniques you can use to strengthen your memory of oneiric thoughts. Techniques that, when applied correctly, allow us to remember dreams surprisingly well.

The use of these methods is indispensable in most cases since people tend to forget dreams completely when they wake up. Why? Because, according to the hypothesis of Sigmund Freud, we have a sort of internal censor that tries to prevent our oneiric activity from becoming conscious material.

Sometimes the message of dreams turns unpleasant and takes the form of a nightmare...

However, we can laugh in the face of this censor with a few tricks. The most drastic is to wake up suddenly when the deepest sleep phase (REM phase) is just about to end, so that you can rapidly write all the details of your mind’s theater in your notebook. Waking suddenly will take this censor by surprise, stopping it from doing its job. The best time to set the alarm is for four, five, six, or a little more than seven hours after going to sleep.

If your level of motivation is not high enough to get up in the middle of the night and record your dreams, there are alternatives that let you sleep for a stretch and then remember what you dream with great precision.

First of all, it’s helpful to develop some habits before going to bed, such as waiting a few hours between dinner and going to sleep. Experts recommend avoiding foods that cause gas (legumes like green beans, raw vegetables, etc.) and foods high in fat.

You must also keep in mind that, like tea and coffee, tobacco and alcohol alter the sleep cycle and deprive the body of a deep sleep (the damaging effects of a few glasses on the body does not disappear for about four hours).

What is recommended is to drink water or juice, or eat a yogurt, more than two hours after eating, before going to bed. There are two main reasons for this: liquids facilitate a certain purification of the body, and because, most interestingly for our purposes, it causes us to get up in the middle of the night. As we said, this will catch the internal censor by surprise and allow us to record our dreams easily.

Relaxing in bed and going over the events of the day helps free the mind and foster oneiric creativity.

Yoga exercises, such as the savasana pose, are great for relaxation, restful sleep, and a positive outlook.

Relaxation
It’s important to surround yourself with an environment that stimulates oneiric activity. You should feel comfortable in your room and your bed. The fewer clothes you wear to sleep, the better. Practicing relaxation techniques, listening to calming music, or taking a warm bath a few minutes before getting into bed will help relieve stress so that you enjoy a deep restorative sleep.

There are good books on relaxation on the market, both autogenous and yogic; we recommend one of the most practical, Relajacion para gente muy ocupada (Relaxation for Busy People), by Shia Green, published by this same publishing house. However, the real key is to concentrate on remembering dreams. When you go to bed, go over the events of the day that were important to you. This way, you will increase the probability of dreaming about the subjects that most interest or worry you.

So, let’s suppose you’re asleep now. What should you do to remember dreams? First, try to wake up naturally, without external stimuli. If this isn’t possible, use the quietest possible alarm without radio. Once awake, stay in bed for a few moments with your eyes closed and try to hold your dreams in your memory as you gently transition into wakefulness. Take advantage of this time to memorize the images you dreamt. The final oneiric period is usually the longest and these instants are when it is most possible to remember dreams.

Remember that it’s best to write the keywords of the dream immediately upon waking. It is convenient to keep a notebook on the nightstand and reconstruct the dream during the day.

The dream notebook
Next, write in the notebook (that you have left beside your bed) whatever your mind has been able to retain, no matter how absurd or trivial your dreams seem, even if you only remember small fragments. This is not the moment to make evaluations or interpretations. The exercise is to simply record everything that crosses your mind with as much detail as possible. Giving the fragility of memory, it’s okay to start off with just a few key words that summarize the content of the dream. These words will help you reconstruct the dream later in the day if you don’t have enough time in the morning. Ideally this notebook will gradually become a diary or schedule that allows you to study, analyze, and compare a series of dreams. Through a series of recorded episodes, you can detect recurring characters, situations, or themes. This is something that’s easy to miss at first glance. One important detail: specialists recommend you date and title each dream, since this helps you remember them in later readings.

It’s also interesting to complement your entries with relevant annotations: what feelings were provoked, which aspects most drew your attention, which colors predominated, etc. An outline or drawing of the most significant images can also help you unravel the meaning. Finally, you should write an initial personal interpretation of the dream. For that, the second part of this book offers some useful guidelines.

While we dream, there is a sort of safety mechanism that inhibits our movement. Therefore, sleepwalkers don’t walk during the REM phase. This protects us from acting out the movements of our dreams and possibly hurting ourselves. Still from the Spanish movie Carne de fieras (Flesh of beasts) (1936).

As we’ve seen, there are a series of techniques to remember dreams. This is the first step to extracting their wisdom. Now, given that oneiric thoughts are a source of inspiration for solving problems, wouldn’t it be great to choose what you dream about before you go to sleep? Rather than waiting for dreams to come to us spontaneously, try to make them focus on the aspects of your life that interest you.

How to determine the theme of dreams
Let’s imagine that someone is not very satisfied with their job. They’d like to get into another line of work but are afraid of losing the job security they enjoy. On one hand, they’re not so young anymore, they should take the risk to get what they really want. But they don’t know what to do. They need a light, a sign, an inspiration. In short, they need a dream. But not just any dream, a dream that really centers on their problem and gives answers.

However, if you limit yourself to just “consulting your pillow,” you won’t get the desired results. There is a possibility you will be lucky and dream about what you’re interested in, but more likely you will dream of anything but. If we are really prepared to dive into that which worries us most intimately, we can direct our dreams to give us concrete answers. Just like the techniques to remember dreams, the process is simple: before sleeping, we must concentrate on the subject of interest.

It’s also best to write in your notebook all the events and emotions of the day that were most important before you go to sleep.

Once your impressions and theme to dream have been noted, concentrate on the subject that most bothers you. Think about it carefully; propose questions and alternatives, “listen” to your own emotions. It’s best if all possible doubts are noted in the dream notebook. This way you’re more likely to receive an answer.

In order for it to be an effective answer, the question must be well defined. The fundamental idea of the problem should be summed up in a single phrase. Once you’ve reflected on the problem, it’s time to go to bed. But the “homework” is not finished yet. Before going to sleep, you need to concentrate on the concrete question. You need to forget everything else, even the details. Just “visualize” and repeat the question, without thinking of anything else, until you fall asleep.

Oneiric thoughts are a source of inspiration. Annotating and analyzing them carefully fosters a process of self discovery.


Writing a dream notebook
You should always have a notebook and pen near your bed to write down dreams the moment you wake up. Don’t forget to always write the date. What details should you include in this kind of diary? As many as you remember, the more the better.

  • Note the events of the dream in order. It may not seem important when they appear unrelated. However, when analyzing them you can establish a chronological relationship between distinct elements.
  • What characters appear in your dreams? Was someone important missing? If one of them reminded you of someone you know, note that. Don’t rely on your memory.
  • If a familiar sight appears, analyze the differences between the dream and the real world. Were the doors/windows in the same place? Were they the same size and color? And so on. This is especially important if you want to practice lucid dreaming.
  • Also note the differences between familiar people in dreams and how
  • Also note the differences between familiar people in dreams and how they are in real life.
  • List the non-human characters that appeared, as well as any objects that behaved as if animated.
  • Take special note of recurrent themes, scenes, or characters. Do they always act/happen the same way?
  • Write down all the colors you remember.
  • Note your emotional reactions: if you feel happy, scared, nervous... Don’t let any theories about the meaning of dreams interfere. You run the risk of skipping details that might be very significant.
  • Finally, don’t trust your memory. After a time, you won’t remember a thing about some of the dreams you wrote down. No matter how clear they are in the moment, write them down.

Dreams are “signs,” messages from our subconscious, and the study and interpretation of them helps resolve the problems that worry us.

Nocturnal sleep puts us in touch with the deepest level of being, which allows us to approach our problems with a wider perspective. And induced dreams tend to be easier to remember than other oneiric activity.

When we dream, we enter a marvelous world that escapes the laws of spatial and temporal logic.... Dreampedia

WHAT ARE MY DREAMS ABOUT?

About Dream Interpretation

Dreams! What do they mean? You probably recognize a connection between the dream world and the “real” world, but did you know that you can actually do things to nurture your dream life? The bulk of this intriguing volume is an alphabetical directory of the psychological and mystical meanings of various dream symbols, from angels to zoos.

For example, if you are chased in your dream, this will show a sense of insecurity. Dreams Interpreted, each page reveals the fantastic meanings of quotidian objects and occurrences that surface in your reveries. Make a note of it when you wake up so you do not forget your dream.... About Dream Interpretation

WHAT DREAMS CAN DO FOR YOU

Dreampedia

Your dream world is an invisible but extremely powerful inner resouce, one that you can learn to access freely. You can learn to command and control your dreams, thereby enriching your life immeasurably.

Once upon a time not so long ago, an inventor was struggling with a major problem. His name was Elias Howe, and for years he had been trying to solve this problem, so that he could complete a machine he was building—a machine that would in time change the world. He was missing a small but vital detail, and, try as he would, he just couldn’t figure it out. Needless to say, Howe was a very frustrated man. One night, after another long day of fruitless work on his project, he dreamed he had been captured by fierce savages. These warriors were attacking him with spears. Although in the dream he was terrified he would be killed, he noticed that the spears were unusual looking: each one had an eye- shaped hole at the pointed end. When Howe woke up, it hit him like a brick: he had actually dreamed the answer to his problem. His nightmare was a blessing in disguise. He immediately saw that the eye of the spear could be an eye in a sewing needle, near its point. Elated with the discovery, he rushed to his laboratory and finished the design of his invention: the sewing machine. The rest, as they say, is history.

The list of what dreams can do for you seems endless. We’ve touched on a few of these benefits of dreaming in the preface and introduction. Now let’s go into a bit more detail. I want you to get really excited about your own dream potential. And, once you realize the possibilities, I think you will.

FAMOUS DREAMERS

The history of dreams is filled with stories of famous people who have called on their dreams for help, or who have received help unexpectedly from their dreams. Here are a few more interesting stories to illustrate the point:

The physicist Niels Bohr, who developed the theory of the movements of electrons, had a dream in which he saw the planets attached to the sun by strings. This image inspired him to finalize his theory.

The great Albert Einstein reported that the famous theory of relativity came to him while he was napping—a good reason for taking frequent naps!

Author Richard Bach, who wrote the bestseller Jonathan Livingston Seagull, was stuck in a writer’s block after writing the first half of his now-famous novel. It was eight years later that he literally dreamed the second half and was able to complete his book.

Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman told reporters that his classic film Cries and Whispers had been inspired by a dream.

Another writer, the well-loved British author Robert Louis Stevenson, was quite dependent on his dreams for ideas that he could turn into sellable stories. Stevenson has related in his memoirs that after a childhood tortured by nightmares, and his successful efforts to overcome them, he was able to put his dreams to work for profit.

A born storyteller (though he started out as a medical student), he was accustomed to lull himself to sleep by making up stories to amuse himself. Eventually, he turned this personal hobby into a profession, becoming a writer of tales like Treasure Island. He identified his dream-helpers as “little people,” or “Brownies.” Once he was in constant contact with this inner source, his nightmares vanished, never to return. Instead, whenever he was in need of income he turned to his dreams:

At once the little people begin to bestir themselves in the same quest, and labour all night long, and all night long set before him truncheons of tales upon their lighted theatre. No fear of his being frightened now; the flying heart and the frozen scalp are things bygone; applause, growing applause, growing interest, growing exultation in his own cleverness . . . and at last a jubilant leap to wakefulness, with the cry, “I have it, that’ll do!”

Stevenson wrote his autobiography in the third person, not revealing that he was the subject until the end.

Stevenson further states that sometimes when he examined the story his Brownies had provided, he was disappointed, finding it unmarketable. However, he also reported that the Brownies “did him honest service and gave him better tales than he could fashion for himself,” that “they can tell him a story piece by piece, like a serial, and keep him all the while in ignorance of where they aim.”

Stevenson’s Brownies are a perfect example of dream helpers just waiting to be called upon. A particularly famous example of the work of Stevenson’s Brownies is the tale The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. As he explains:

I had long been trying to write a story on this subject, to find a body, a vehicle, for that strong sense of man’s double being, which must at times come in upon and overwhelm the mind of every thinking creature. [After he destroyed an earlier version of the manuscript . . .] For two days I went about racking my brains for a plot of any sort; and on the second night I dreamed the scene at the window, and a scene afterwards split in two, in which Hyde, pursued for some crime, took the powder and underwent the change in the presence of his pursuers. All the rest was made awake, and consciously, although I think I can trace in much of it the manner of my Brownies.

Although Stevenson did the “mechanical work, which is about the worst of it,” writing out the tales with pen and paper, mailing off the stories to publishers, paying the postage, and not incidentally collecting the fees, he gave his Brownies almost total credit for his productions.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, a British poet, was accustomed to taking a sedative derived from opium (legal in those days). One afternoon after taking a dose he was reading and fell asleep over his book. The last words he read had been, “Here the Khan Kubla commanded a palace to be built.” When Coleridge awoke some three hours later he had dreamed hundreds of lines of poetry, which he immediately set to writing down. The opening lines of this poem—one of the most famous of all time—are:

  • In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
    A stately pleasure-dome decree:
    Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
    Through caverns measureless to man
    Down to a sunless sea.

Unfortunately for posterity, after writing only fifty-four lines of the two to three hundred he had dreamed, Coleridge was interrupted by a caller, whom he entertained for an hour. When he returned to complete the poem, he had lost all the rest of what he had dreamed! In his diary he noted that it had disappeared “like images on the surface of a stream.” Even so, he had written a masterpiece. This true story, however, emphasizes the need to record dreams upon awakening, a subject we will take up in chapters 5 and 6.

Not only artists and writers give their dreams credit for their ideas and inspirations, but many scientists as well (as we saw in the examples of Bohr and Einstein). Psychologist Eliot D. Hutchinson reports numerous cases of scientists receiving information through dreams and says of dreams that “by them we can see more clearly the specific mechanism of intuitive thought,” and that “a large number of thinkers with whom I have had direct contact admit that they dream more or less constantly about their work, especially if it is exceptionally baffling . . . they often extract useful conceptions.”

I personally can attest to this statement, as it mirrors my own experience writing books. For example, when I began work on this book about dreams, I noticed that my dream production immediately doubled; and I have had Stevenson’s experience of “little people,” whom I call my “elves,” and whom I write about extensively in my book for teens called Teen Astrology, telling about how they came to my rescue when I was quite stuck (see chapter 9, pages 249– 252 in that book).

One of the most astonishing as well as fascinating stories is that of Hermann V. Hilprecht, a professor of Assyrian at the University of Pennsylvania in the late 1800s. It seems to be a characteristic of those who receive dream help that they have recently been working long and hard and are frustrated. In Hilprecht’s case, he was working late one evening in 1893, attempting to decipher the cuneiform characters on drawings of two small fragments of agate. He thought they belonged to Babylonian finger rings, and he had tentatively assigned one fragment to the so-called Cassite period of 1700 B.C.E. However, he couldn’t classify the second fragment. And he wasn’t at all sure about the first either. He finally gave up his efforts at about midnight and went straight to bed—and had the following dream, which was his “astounding discovery.”

Hilprecht dreamed of a priest of pre-Christian Nippur, several thousand years ago, who led the professor into the treasure chamber of the temple and showed him the originals, telling him just how the fragments fitted in, all in great detail. Although the dream was long and involved, Hilprecht remembered it all and in the morning told it to his wife. In his words: “Next morning . . . I examined the fragments once more in the light of these disclosures, and to my astonishment found all the details of the dream precisely verified in so far as the means of verification were in my hands.”

Up until then, Hilprecht had been working only with drawings. Now he traveled to the museum in Constantinople where the actual agate fragments were kept and discovered that they fitted together perfectly, unlocking the secret of a three-thousand-year-old mystery by means of a dream!

How did this happen? Clairvoyance? Magic? Who was the priest? How was it that Hilprecht seemed to make contact in a dream with someone who had lived so long before him? We will never know the answers to these questions; but we do know from the professor’s own words that this is exactly what happened to him. (It makes you wonder whether Professor Hilprecht was in the habit of paying attention to his dreams!)

No doubt one of the most famous dream sources of scientific discovery was experienced by the German chemist Friedrich August Kekulé, when he was attempting to understand and model the molecular structure of benzene. Like Professor Hilprecht, Kekulé had been searching for the answer for many years and was totally immersed in the problem. He told of a dream he had while he napped in front of his fireplace one frigid night in 1865:

Again the atoms were juggling before my eyes:
My mind’s eye, sharpened by repeated sights of a similar kind, could not distinguish larger structures of different forms and in long chains, many of them close together; everything was moving in a snake-like and twisting manner. Suddenly, what was this? One of the snakes got hold of its own tail and the whole structure was mockingly twisting in front of my eyes. As if struck by lightning, I awoke.

This dream led Kekulé directly to the discovery of the structure of benzene, which is a closed carbon ring. A dream had presented a realization that served to revolutionize modern chemistry. Later, reporting his discovery to his colleagues at a scientific convention in 1890, he remarked, “Let us learn to dream, gentlemen, and then we may perhaps find the truth.” Not the sort of comment one generally expects from a scientist!

Here is the story of another scientist. Otto Loewi, who won the 1936 Nobel

Prize in Psychology and Medicine for his discovery of how the human nervous system works, credited this discovery to a dream. Prior to Loewi, scientists had assumed that the body’s nervous impulses were the result of electrical waves. However, in 1903 Loewi had the intuition that a chemical transmission was actually responsible. But he had no way to prove his theory, so he set the idea aside for many years. Then, in 1920, he had the following dream:

The night before Easter Sunday of that year I awoke, turned on the light, and jotted down a few notes on a tiny slip of thin paper. Then I fell asleep again. It occurred to me at six o’clock in the morning that during the night I had written down something most important, but I was unable to decipher the scrawl. The next night, at three o’clock, the idea returned. It was the design of an experiment to determine whether or not the hypothesis of chemical transmission that I had uttered seventeen years ago was correct. I got up immediately, went to the laboratory and performed a simple experiment on a frog’s heart according to the nocturnal design:
Its results became the foundation of the theory of chemical transmission of the nervous impulse.

Interestingly, Loewi had previously performed a similar experiment, which combined in his dreaming mind with the new idea, creating the successful result. This is an excellent example of the ability of dreams to combine with previous dreams, or with actual events, to produce fertile new ground.

These are some of the stories of famous people who have used dreams to solve problems, enhance creativity, and even make money and win important prizes. They are all evidence of the vast human ability to make use of dreams. As you draw upon your own dream life and develop skills in both dreaming and interpreting your dreams, you will become an advanced teen dreamer. Think of your dreams as a school where you are continually learning new skills and developing new aptitudes, reaching ever higher levels of achievement.

As you pay conscious attention to your dreams, and then use your dream symbols in your waking life, you will be integrating yourself, creating the greatest artwork of your life: your whole and unique Self.... Dreampedia

WHY ARE DREAMS HEALING?

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The idea that dreams can be healing is not new. In the ancient civiliza¬ tions of Egypt and Greece, patients who failed to respond to medical treatment could arrange to sleep in a temple especially dedicated to the god of healing. They hoped he would visit them in a dream, enabling them to regain their health. The temples of the Greek God Asclepius were especially renowned for their high success rate - and often grew rich on the contributions of grateful patients.

Native American Indians believed that dreams were sent by the Great Spirit, to act as a guiding light for your soul and prevent it from becoming lost in the darkness of ignorance. Losing touch with them would be disastrous, as you would then be unaware of your true path in life and become depressed or ill.

The eminent psychologist Carl Jung also believed in the healing power of dreams, many years of clinical experience convincing him that most of our problems are the

result of losing contact with our deepest instincts. He observed that there is a way of gaining access to the age-old wisdom hidden in each of us deep within the unconscious mind. That way is through our dreams.

Nowadays, doctors are well aware of the link between our state of mind and physical symptoms. Stress is a major factor in ill-health, whilst suppressed

feelings like rage or resentment can also disturb the body’s equilibrium and create dis-ease. Our dreams are nature’s way of helping us to maintain a balanced outlook. They usually contain helpful messages about the emotional adjustments we need to make from day to day. If we take these seriously, we avoid nurturing unrealistic attitudes and prevent the build-up of stress or toxic emotions.

Sometimes you may develop an illness if you secretly feel unable to face up to something and have a need for someone to take care of you. Your dreams can reveal your hidden agenda and suggest a way for¬ ward. In helping you to focus on the underlying cause of your symptoms, they enable you to participate in your own healing process.

Your dreams can further your emotional well-being by helping you to understand how your feelings and attitudes affect other people, often at a subliminal level, and can therefore create or destroy relationships. If someone has let you down, for instance, your dreams may reveal that, subconsciously, you expect people to disappoint you - and, sooner or later, that is exactly what they do. Once you wake up to the fact that relationships don’t have to turn out this way, you can transform your life.

Whether you need more confidence, to have better relationships, or the courage to make the correct decisions, your dreams can guide you through even the most difficult situations and help you to become the person nature always meant you to be. I hope this Dream Encyclopedia will inspire you to find out more about one of your most precious, yet most neglected natural resources - your dreams.... Dreampedia

WHY DO WE DREAM? PHYSIOLOGY OF DREAMS

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“Everything serious comes to us at night.”
CICERO

What happens when we sleep?

Why do we sleep? The answer is not as simple as it seems. We sleep so that our body can rest, we think at first. However, science has not been able to prove concretely that sleep is necessary for physical recuperation of the body. Experiments performed on rats have proven that when deprived of sleep, these animals die.

But human nature is not as simple as that of rats. Everyone knows people who barely sleep. The most extreme case, published in some scientific magazines, is that of a man who claims not to have slept since contracting a serious illness. In a similar vein, some individuals with a highly developed spirituality are able to remain conscious all night. We’re not referring to a student during exam time drinking coffee or taking stimulants to stay awake more than twenty-four hours straight. We’re talking about people who can achieve advanced levels of relaxation through deep meditation.

It is known that anxiety and lack of concentration increase considerably after a night or two without sleep. One theory related to sleep affirms that we sleep to conserve energy. However, another suggests that we rest to conserve our food stores, since when we lose consciousness, we repress the hunger mechanism.


How much do we sleep?

Sleep at different ages

In the course of his life, a person has, on average, 300,000 dreams. As we age, both the time we spend sleeping and the time we spend dreaming decrease gradually.

Newborns sleep almost all day, alternating hours of sleep with short spells of wakefulness. By one year of age, they sleep fewer sessions but for longer in total: they have cycles of 90 minutes of sleep followed by another 90 minutes of waking time. Gradually, the child will sleep more at night and less during the day. By 9 years of age, most need between 9 and 12 hours of sleep a day.

The average for an adult is between 7 and 8.5 hours. But after age 70, we return to the sleep phases of childhood and sleep fewer hours continuously.

There are arguments that even claim we have slept since ancient times in order to appear a less tasty snack for nocturnal predators (when we sleep, our body looks like a corpse).

There are theories to suit everyone, but we shouldn’t forget the fundamental: for almost all of us, sleeping is a relaxing and pleasant experience that lasts between six and eight hours each night, an experience that is utterly necessary to “recharge the batteries” of our bodies.

It’s no coincidence that we choose nighttime to sleep. In the darkness our vision is reduced, the world becomes strange, and as a result, our imagination runs wild. Our minds remain occupied with images (that is, dreams). At night, our eyes don’t work, but we have a need to create images. If for some reason we are deprived of sleep, the following nights our dream production increases, since we spend more time in the REM phase (the period of sleep when oneiric thoughts are most active). Therefore it seems evident that we need dreams to live.

Some ancient civilizations believed that dreaming served, more than anything, to be able to dream. They were convinced that oneiric activity wasn’t the result of sleeping, but rather the reason for it. Some scientists, however, don’t share the theories of our ancestors when it comes to the reason behind our dreams.

There is a scientific school of thought that asserts that oneiric thoughts are simply a neurophysiological activity that comes with sleep. According to this theory, when we sleep we generate spontaneous signals that stimulate the sensory channels in the mind. The brain transforms these signals into visual images and induces the dreamer to believe that he is living real experiences.

Up to that point, perfect. But, why do dreams have such an interesting narrative? Why do they so often express metaphoric language? Why do they narrate stories that directly affect us? There is no concrete or scientific answer to these questions.

Percentages of REM sleep

Cold-blooded animals never dream; the cold temperatures at night cause them to hibernate and all their vital functions, including the brain, slow down. Only when the sun comes out or the temperature rises to an acceptable level do they recuperate all vital functions. The only cold-blooded animal that has shown signs of dreaming is the chameleon.

On the other hand, we know all warm-blooded animals dream, since REM-phase activity has been detected in all of them. Birds dream only about 0.5% of the time they spend asleep, while humans dream up to 20% of the time. There are exceptional cases, such as that of the Australian platypus, that never dream.

Other theories suggest that dreams serve to eliminate unnecessary facts from memory, since we can’t store everything that happens every day. According to this thesis, at night we erase the “archives” we don’t need, just like a computer. The sleeping mind tests the process of erasing in the form of dreams, which would explain why they’re so difficult to remember. There are obvious limitations to this theory if you keep in mind that, occasionally, oneiric thoughts work creatively (they go beyond the information that we give them). These don’t have much to do with the merely “hygienic” function that the aforementioned scientific community claims. Often, dreams don’t eliminate the useless leftovers of daily experiences. Quite the opposite: they give them a surprising new shape, so when we wake up, we can reflect more deeply on their meaning.

The phases of sleep

Even though we don’t realize it, when we sleep at night we pass through four different phases of sleep. Each phase is distinguished by the deepness of sleep. That is, when we are in phase 1, it is a fairly light sleep; during phase 4, we reach maximum intensity.

When we go to sleep, we enter a period in which we gradually pull away from the exterior world. Little by little, our sleep deepens until finally (phase 4) our breathing slows and becomes regular, our cardiac rhythm slows down, and our body temperature decreases. Therefore the body’s metabolism also reduces its activity.

More or less an hour after falling asleep, your body has already gone through the four phases. At this point you begin to go back through the levels until you return to phase 1. This brings along an increase in respiratory and cardiac rhythm. Parallel to this, brain waves once again start to register an activity close to that of consciousness. You are therefore in a moment of transition, demonstrated by the fact that at this point the body tends to change position.

All signs indicate that any noise might wake us. But that’s not the case: since your muscle tone has been reduced, this is actually the moment when it’s most difficult to regain consciousness. At the same time, your eyes begin to move behind your eyelids (up and down and side to side). This ocular phenomenon, which anyone can observe easily, is known as the REM phases, which stands for “rapid eye movement.”

Certain areas of the brain are associated with different functions and human skills, translating external sensory stimuli into a well-organized picture of the world. In dreams, those same stimuli produce different reactions. If a sleeping person hears a sound or touches something repulsive, those stimuli will probably be integrated into their dream before they wake up.

The REM phase

The REM phase is particularly important for those interested in dreams. All studies indicate that during this brief spell (from five to ten minutes) we typically experience the most intense oneiric activity. Some of these studies, done in a sleep laboratory, have observed that eight out of ten individuals relate very vivid dreams when woken up right at the end of the REM phase. These periods alternate at night with what we could call non-REM phases, that is, periods when no ocular movement is registered.

How many times do we reach a REM stage at night? It is estimated that each cycle is repeated four to seven times. As the hours pass, each phase gets longer. This way, the final REM stage might last twenty to forty minutes. On average, an adult enjoys an hour and a half of REM sleep each night, although for older individuals it may be less than an hour and a quarter. Babies, on the other hand, remain in the REM phase for 60 percent of the time they spend asleep.

In any case, let’s make this clear: not all dreams are produced during this period. It has also been demonstrated that humans generate images in other stages. However, these are dreams of a different quality, since during the non-REM phases, our oneiric activity tends to generate only undefined thoughts, vague sensations, etc. Nothing close to the emotional content that characterizes dreams produced in the REM phase.

The oneiric images produced in the most intense phase (REM) are more difficult to remember. One method to remember them consists of waking up just after each REM phase.

As we’ve commented already, those who wish to read their dreams have to first do the work of remembering them. If we want this work to be 100 percent effective, we can use a method that, although uncomfortable, almost never fails: wake up just after every REM phase. If you want to try this method, set your alarm (without music or radio) to go off four, five, six, or seven and a half hours after falling asleep. You can be sure that if you wake up just after one of the REM phases you go through each night, you will enjoy vivid memories.

This is the process used in sleep laboratories, where oneiric activity is studied through encephalographic registry of electrical brain activity.

The people in the study—who are volunteers—sleep connected to machines that register their physiological reactions (brain waves, cardiac rhythm, blood pressure, muscle activity, eye movement, etc).

At certain points during the night, these reactions indicate that, if you wake them, they will be able to tell you what they dreamed. This is because the phase that produces the most intense dreams (REM) is characterized by a physical reaction easily observed: the rapid movement of the eyes of the dreamer.

With this method, sleep laboratories can collect proof of precisely

when subjects are dreaming. And given that oneiric images are difficult to remember, the lab techniques have been a great advance in dream research. Some experts assert that thanks to the scientific advances of the second half of the twentieth century, we have learned more about sleep processes in the last fifty years than in all the history of humanity.

What do we dream?

A wide study done in France on the subject of dreams produced these results:

  • Relationships with partners (18%)
  • Home, especially that of our childhood (15%) -Aggressors, thieves, being chased, etc. (10%)
  • Missing the train; embarrassing baggage (8%) -Water, wells, tunnels; traffic accidents (6%) -Forgotten children or babies (5%)
  • Snakes, fires, stairs (5%)
  • Negative animals: spiders, cockroaches, rats, etc. (4%) -Clothing or lack of clothing; nakedness (3%)
  • Losing teeth or other alarming situations (2%)

Hypnagogic images: between waking and sleep

As we’ve seen, throughout the night our sleep is divided into four distinct phases. But what happens just before we sink into the first phase? Are we still awake? Not exactly. In the moments when our mind decides between wakefulness and sleep, we begin to lose contact with the world around us, without the characteristic physiological changes of sleep.

This intermediate point has been called the “hypnagogic state” by psychologists. This is a period when, despite the fact that we’re not asleep, our brains generate images that can sometimes be very beautiful. In some ways, these images rival those found in our dreams.

Hypnagogic images of great visual beauty evaporate like bubbles when we wake up and are barely remembered.

However, the hypnagogic state cannot be considered a truly oneiric state. Among other reasons, the scenes produced in this phase are unrelated to the episodes with a more or less coherent plot that characterize dreams.

In the hypnagogic state we produce unrelated images that hardly connect to each other and that, unlike dreams, are not linked to our daily experiences. This phenomenon occurs not only before sleeping but also in the moments before waking up, when we are not yet conscious enough to be aware of them.

Sometimes, before falling asleep we also experience a curious sensation of floating or flying, or we may see very sharp scenes, with a clarity comparable to that of real visual experiences. These types of images, like dreams, evaporate like bubbles when we wake up and we barely remember them, which is a shame because their beauty slips from our minds. In any case, unlike oneiric thoughts, the hypnagogic state is little use for understanding the messages our subconscious wants to send us, and we should value it more for its beauty than its transcendental content.

Salvador Dali, painter of dreams.

To remember them you must not lose consciousness during the apparition. That is, you must observe the process of the hypnagogic state without falling asleep. It seems simple but it is not, because you must submerge yourself in sleep while the mind remains aware of the events happening in its interior. With a little luck, we can see some of the marvelous “paintings” of our private museum.

The surrealist artists of the 20s and 30s knew all about this. This is how Salvador Dali, fervent lover of hypnagogic scenes, turned to what is known as “the monk’s sleep.” He went to bed with a large iron key in his hand. With the first dream, the key would fall to the floor and he would wake up suddenly. In his mind he recorded the hypnagogic images he would later transfer to the canvas in his masterful style.

The seven “chakras,” or centers of subtle energy in the ayurvedic hindu medicine (1).
The nadis according to Tibetan tradition (2).
The meridians of traditional Chinese medicine (3).

If you have difficulty retaining the hypnagogic state, try centering your attention on a concrete point. For example the “third eye” of the yogis (that is, between your eyes), in the area of the heart, or in the top of the head. These three positions are, according to the philosophy of yoga, the centers of subtle rather than physical energy in the human body. You need a place to direct the mind. Another trick to hold attention without effort is to think abstractly about the name of the object you wish to see. This doesn’t mean you have to “create” the images; you just have to induce its appearance during the hypnagogic state. Entering through meditation is also very useful and beneficial.

Sometimes, the hypnagogic scenes are not as pleasant as we would like, but we must confront them in order to strengthen our ability for self-control. If they persist, try following the previous advice. Think abstractly about the name of what you want to see, resisting the temptation to construct it in a certain way from the conscious mind.

The main advantage of the hypnagogic state is that it brings us progressively closer to our deep Self . . . and all that helps to understand and better benefit from dreams.

The same subject can have very different meanings depending on the circumstances and personal situation of the dreamer.... Dreampedia

WHY REMEMBER YOUR DREAMS?

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Your dreaming mind has access to information that is not readily available to you when you are awake. Your dreams may reveal your secret desires and subconscious feelings.

In remembering your dreams, you will have an increased knowledge about yourself, bring about self- awareness and self-healing. Dreams are an extension of how you perceive yourself. They can be a source of inspiration, wisdom, and joy.

You don’t have to interpret your dreams in order to solve your problems. But just as there is the saying that “Death cures cigarette smoking,” you might find that listening to your dreams may help you solve your problems before you run out of time.

Dreams are always “true”—it’s just that what they mean isn’t always what we think they mean. Sometimes a dream gives a warning of danger, but if you pay attention to the dream and change your ways the danger won’t necessarily happen. And most often a dream’s meaning will be metaphorical, not literal.

For example, a woman may dream that her husband is having a sexual affair, but it would be a mistake to conclude that her husband is really having an affair. The dream is simply providing the woman graphic evidence that she somehow feels betrayed by her husband. Once she acknowledges that feeling, she can then start examining her life consciously—and honestly—to find out why she feels betrayed and what she needs to do about it.

All dreams essentially tell us one important thing: “Wake up!” That is, just as you must wake up from a dream to remember it, the dream itself is telling you to “wake up” to the truth that you try to hide from others—and from yourself.

Of course, there is a positive as well as a negative side to remembering and interpreting your dreams.

The negative side is that you may come across a side of yourself that you really don’t like or are afraid to know about. You may discover that you aren’t (always) the “Miss Goody Two Shoes” or “Mr. Nice Guy” that you profess to be during the day. You may discover that your childhood was not all ice cream, roller-skating and amusement parks. You may end up shedding light on dark places and recall secrets long repressed. This can be scary stuff.

The positive side is that you go through a metamorphosis or catharsis and become -- you. You become the “you” that you were always meant to be. You will become truer to yourself and therefore, you will find that you are happier.

Learning to recall your dreams may help you become a more assertive, creative person. In remembering your dreams, you are expressing and confronting your

feelings. Remembering your dreams can help you come to terms with stressful aspects of your lives.

But this may be easier said than done. Five minutes after the end of the dream, half the content is forgotten. After ten minutes, 90% is lost. Dreamers, who are awakened right after REM sleep, are able to recall their dreams more vividly than those who slept through the night until morning.Obviously, remembering your dreams is vital to interpreting them. So, how can you better remember your dreams?... Dreampedia

WISH FULFILLMENT DREAMS

Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)... Strangest Dream Explanations

WORD ANALYSIS OF DREAMS

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Having written a dream down, by using highlighting pens to make all matching words the same colour, one can immediately see the main issues in some dreams.

Example: ‘We walk around, go upstairs, and I notice a staircase leading to a room or rooms. It goes up square, about eight steps in a flight, but round and round—spiral. I am scared by them, don’t want to go up, but am curious. We move in and nobody but myself has really taken any notice of the stairs. Nobody has been up . In one dream I try to go up but the children are scared for me. They plead, ‘Don’t go up Mum, just forget them”. Then I wake. In the next dream I wait till they are asleep. Half way up_ I am terrified but have to go on. Then I wake. Next dream I got up there. Then I woke’ (Ann H). Ann’s dream theme recurs, so is important to her. In marking just some of the words we see that the ‘up’ or go up’ is important. Childhood fears hold Ann back for a while, but she dares to climb.

If we look at the entries for climb and stairs, we see they depict taking steps towards ex­ploring the unknown, daring to explore one’s potential or opportunities.

By marking the words in this way we might also highlight certain statements otherwise hidden in the dream. Particularly watch out for the connections with the word T, such as I want, I do, I will, I have, I know, I cannot, etc. Example: ‘1 want to withdraw.’ I was full of sadness but was trying not to show it.’ ‘1 felt keyed up and ready to fight.’ Taking such statements out of context and looking for connections with everyday feelings oi situations often throws considerable light on the dream.

If what you realise is then considered in con­nection with the plot of the dream, the viewpoint your uncon­scious has on the situation might become evident.

For in­stance, the statement ‘I felt keyed up’ occurred within a classroom, and helped the dreamer understand the anger gen­erated at school. See amplification; plot of the dream; the comments on dream processing in the Introduction; dream processing; postures, movement, body language; settings; symbols and dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

WORKING WITH DREAMS

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How to Remember a Dream
Everyone of us can learn to remember dreams. This, of course, is a prerequisite to working with dream symbols. After you are reliably recalling dreams, you can begin to program them for problem solving.

The most effective way to work with dreams is to keep a dream journal. Date each entry as you go along, for you will begin to see patterns and recurring themes as the weeks go by. If you do not understand an important dream message, you will be given more dreams trying to get the same point across. So do not worry about losing a big lesson; you will be given the message again and again until you finally get the idea. The most important thing in learning to remember a dream is your intent to do so.

Before going to sleep sit on the side of your bed (if you lie down you may fall asleep before you finish the process), take several deep breaths and relax. Then say to yourself, “Tonight I want to remember a dream and I will remember a dream. As soon as I awaken I will write it down.” Then go to sleep with a pad and pencil beside your bed, expecting to remember and write down a dream as soon as you open your eyes. If you prefer, record your dream on a cassette tape recorder.

When you awaken, whether at 3:00 a.m. or right before getting up the next morning, immediately record any impressions, images, or feelings about the dream. If you do not usually remember dreams, you may have only a vague sense about it: a feeling of frustration, uplift, concern, peace. Just write down whatever you sense in the waking moment. If you have good recall of most of the dream images, put down everything in as much detail as possible: people, vehicles, scenery, objects, colors, shapes, numbers and so on.

If you do not immediately write down the dream, you will lose it. Do not think that you can go back to sleep and remember it later. You are in an altered state of consciousness, that half-awake half-asleep state when you first open your eyes. Until you learn to build bridges between levels of consciousness, you will not be able to recall your dream once you are fully awake. That is why you tell yourself you will remember and write down the dream.

By continuing to practice this technique of writing down material, bringing it back from superconscious to conscious mind, you are learning to bridge the gap between levels of consciousness.

You dream all during the night, but often your best teaching dreams occur between 3:00 and 5:00 a.m. or right upon awakening. Of course, if you are working the night shift and sleep during the day, your dream schedule will be adjusted to your biological rhythms. But dreams can come at any time whether during a nap in the afternoon or a catnap after dinner.

Using Dreams for Problem Solving
Even if you do not consciously use dreams for problem solving, you no doubt have had the experience of waking up in the morning with a clear and simple answer to a problem. You may not even remember a dream, but you know what to do in the situation at hand. This technique has been used for centuries to get insight. The conscious mind can struggle and wrestle with a problem, but when it is released to the superconscious mind, the greater infinite resources of consciousness, the answer effortlessly appears.

Deliberately programming your dreams for answers to problems, however, is taking even more control of the dream state and letting it work for you.

To use dreams for problem solving, again sit on the side of your bed before going to sleep. Take several deep breaths, relax, and bring the problem to mind. Whether it concerns relationships, career, health, inspiration for a creative project, or whatever, go over in your mind all the different parts of the problem that seem relevant. You have already thought about it, reflected upon it, but you are not sure which is the best direction, or the most positive solution. Feel into the problem as well as mentally reviewing it. Now mentally repeat, “Tonight I will have and remember a dream containing information for the solution to this problem. The problem concerns . . . (and briefly describe it as objectively as possible). I will now have this dream, and will recall, understand, and record it upon awakening. I open myself to the highest possible insight and guidance.” Then go to sleep, completely releasing the situation from your mind, resting in the expectation that you will receive the answer.

As soon as you awaken write down everything you can remember. Write down any general sense of the dream, feelings, impressions, as well as images. You may awaken with a clear recall of a dream which, upon analysis, gives a very definite answer. You may awaken with a strong sense of just knowing what to do. Or, sometime during the day, something in waking reality may trigger an image or impression from the dream, and you have your answer.

You may recall a dream that you cannot seem to figure out. Just record it, and continue the process the following night.

Avoid telling yourself that the process is not working, however. It is working; you just do not yet understand it. So if you do not have the answer you want upon awakening, do another little relaxation before starting your day. Suggest to yourself: “I have completely released this problem or situation to a higher wisdom within me. This answer is now presenting itself to me. I am open and receptive.” Then dismiss the concern from your mind. Holding on to it or worrying about it will block your insight. If you do not get the answer during the day, repeat the programming pro-cedure again before going to sleep. You should have the answer to any problem within a three day period.

Some people have said to me: “But I have tried to program dreams and it just did not work.” There may be a variety of reasons. First, anything that affects the chemistry of the body significantly—alcohol, drugs, barbiturates, Valium, sleeping pills—may completely botch dream recall. Your dreams will not be clear if you are able to remember them at all. A full meal right before going to sleep also affects dream life in a negative way.

Second, it is important to be relaxed when programming or asking for a dream. Do deep breathing and relax your body. Still the conscious mind enough to focus on the programming technique. Feel the desire to problem solve or get insight from your dreams. Don’t just mouth the words. You want the feeling of the heart center but the detachment and clarity of the third eye, so you are not reacting emotionally. Love yourself for creating the situation. It is a valuable teacher. Love yourself for now desiring to resolve and move beyond it. Love all persons involved for helping you learn and get to know yourself. When you approach problem solving through love, the answers are more readily available to you.

Third, ask yourself, “Do I really want to know what is best? Or am I trying to dictate the answer? Am I really open to the best and highest solution, or am I blocking my receptivity through fear?” Sometimes we ask for things that we really do not want to know. Particularly if the problem involves a decision over a major transition—leaving a relationship, changing jobs, taking self-responsibility—we may not really want to hear it. Ask, and you shall receive. But the asking must be an honest, open asking.

Finally, you may not be asking the right question. Questions should always have to do with insight into self, not how to change or manipulate others. If you are asking how to get your spouse to stop drinking, you are starting in the wrong place. Instead, realize that it is his or her responsibility to change, and all the love and support in the world may not be enough to help. The question should be: why have I created this situation for myself? What in myself needs to be changed to enable me to have a love-filled, joyous life? Through a need to be needed, a martyr syndrome, poor self- image or a number of other things, you may feel stuck in a situation. You can be assured of only one thing: with genuine self-insight the situation will change. You may have to leave it, you may not. But above all you must desire wisdom, not limiting ideas about self and others.

Remember the greatest thing we can do for another is to honor his or her inner power to make decisions and choose the kind of life he or she wants to live. We are all free to make our own mistakes. That is the only way we learn. When you are too concerned with shaping up someone else’s life, you can be sure you are copping out on your own lessons. If you are saying to yourself, “If so and so would just change, then I would be fine,” that is handwriting on the wall that you are avoiding self-responsibility.

So, ask for insight into self. Release others to learn their own lessons. You certainly can pray for others and send them love. But do so in the way that you are honoring their higher self, giving them the energy and freedom to make their own decisions, to determine their best life path, whether or not it may include you and your expectations and desires.

Kinds of Dreams
There are six basic kinds of dreams, and often you will remember snatches from several of them. As you begin to work with dreams more and more, you will recognize the differences and determine the value each is offering you. I call these different dreams clearing house or clutter, teaching, problem solving, precognitive, prophetic or visionary, and outside interference.

Clearing house
These dreams clean out the input from the day, sorting through mental and emotional clutter, rerunning experiences. Often the mind is still running a mile a minute when you first try to go to sleep. You are worried, anxious, stressful. These dreams begin the process of releasing useless concerns and integrating helpful ones. They help body and mind begin to relax.

If you meditate before going to sleep, stilling and focusing the mind, the clutter dreams are usually unnecessary. If you practice briefly rerunning the day in your mind, blessing, releasing and forgiving self and others, you are ready for a higher level of awareness in the dream state. Also, your energy will be higher and your dreams will be clearer.

Teaching
You usually have one important teaching dream a night. This gives you information on problems you are facing, or shows you higher teachings from advanced levels. You are prepared for what is going to happen during the next 24 hours. Often a dejâ vu experience is remembering what the superconscious mind stored in the subconscious memory back during the dream state. You already knew you were going to say something in a certain way, or that a particular person was going to do or say something. Most dreams are concerned with what you are presently going through and how best to deal with situations and relationships.

You may find yourself sitting in a classroom, giving or hearing a lecture, or walking with a teacher in some beautiful surroundings. You may be hearing information you never knew before and have good recall of it upon awakening. Many discoveries and inspirations have come from higher levels of these teaching dreams.

Problem solving
These are dreams you have programmed or asked for. You may be seeking insight on understanding a difficult relationship, solving a scientific mystery, or asking for the plot of a new novel. All knowledge and information are available to you when you learn how to tap it. Learning how to program dreams and understand their messages is one of your most valuable inner resources.

Precognitive
This dream gives you a glimpse of something in the future. It is different from the cieja vu experience, because precognition is usually concerning someone other than yourself. Precognition means foreknowing. There is a special sense or feeling to the precognitive dream. As you learn to recognize it, you will know which images are symbolic and which may happen to be literal precognitive events. It is a psychic level phenomenon.

Most precognitive dreams are given to awaken people to expanded dimensions of the mind. Often non-meditators will have them, for then they are forced to ask how they know such and such about a particular person. The mind, of course, is not bound by time. Hopefully these dreams direct your attention inward so that you become more interested in developing and learning about the inner self.

Prophetic or visionary
This dream comes from the highest level of the soul. It is a message from God or the God-self and concerns spiritual growth. It comes from the mystical level of awareness. It may have a personal message or may contain a universal truth. The vision is on a much larger scale than you commonly associate with dreaming. It has a totally different quality of awareness about it. You know you are awake, aware, yet also realize you are in the dream state. Prophesies of old and mystical teachings have come through the visionary level of consciousness. A vision has many qualities within it: insight, understanding, expansion, realization of the oneness of all life, power and love. I may have only one vision a year, but it is always worth waiting for.

Outside Interference
This dream is produced when something in your physical environment is causing enough disruption to get incorporated in your dream story. For example, you dream you are very hot and awaken to find too many covers piled on top of you. Ringing phones, barking dogs, cold feet on your back—anything can be a part of the dream, with no real message from the superconscious or higher self.

Also, if you fall asleep watching television or listening to the radio, any or all of that information can affect your dreams. It is always best to sleep in a quiet, restful environment. There is enough blaring into the subconscious throughout the day without adding more to it during your sleep time.

Indigestion or a full bladder also affects dream images. Just be aware when interpreting dreams that you may be picking up such outside interferences.

Anatomy of a Dream
Dreams often present themselves in three steps. First they give the time reference for the problem, situation or program you are running. For example, if you are shown a house you lived in when you were a child, the house represents an old program or awareness of self that started way back then.

Second, they will show you how the problem is manifesting itself now in your life and present awareness—what is surrounding it.

Third, they will present the solution to the situation, or how to learn from and move beyond the program or problem that is limiting you.

Most teaching dreams will follow this format. If you remember seeing a car, house, school or person of your past, that is usually part of the first phase of the dream.

Understanding Dream Symbols
The most curious thing about dreams, perhaps, is they speak to us in symbols. These may seem strange, but once we understand the meaning they are much clearer than our usual way of attempting to communicate with ourselves and others.

Why, you may ask, do I have to go through all the symbology in dreams? Wouldn’t it be easier just to get the straight message? Communication among people is difficult at best. So many things are open to misinterpretation because of blocks and perceptual filters.

My guidance has said that dreams are given symbolically because once you know your own symbols you cannot mistake the message. You will know instantly what is being given to you and you will understand it totally. Actually symbols are like shorthand and are much easier to interpret than verbal conversation.

Working with dream symbols might be compared to playing the piano. When you first begin you are certain that this has to be the most awkward and complicated thing you have ever undertaken. But after a routine of regular practice, your new skill becomes a natural, flowing easy part of your life. Or, take the computer industry. If you do not understand computer language, it all seems foreign and difficult. If you hear someone speaking a language different from your own, it is the old ‘it’s all Greek to me” feeling. If you speak, read and write Greek, however, it is another story.

So think of working with dream symbols as just learning another language. They are a higher, more accurate, more integrative level, that enables you to become aware of self as an interdimensional being.

The Starting Point
There are primary dream symbols which usually have the same meanings. A good place to begin is to realize that everything in the dream is you. You are the producer, writer, actor and director. People in the dream usually represent qualities within yourself you have projected on to them. Male and female figures represent your own masculine and feminine energies. A child represents your child part, an aged person an old part of self, either one that is wise or a part that is dying because you have outgrown it. Animals represent feelings you have about specific animals or the characteristics associated with them; for example, a wolf is danger, like the wolf in sheep’s clothing; a fox is cunning and craftiness.

A house, building, store or other structure is you. If it is large, it indicates great potential and awareness of opportunities and/or inner resources. If the rooms are cluttered, you obviously are not keeping your house in order. If some of the rooms are dark, they are parts of the self you do not know or understand. The attic or upstairs represents the spiritual self, the ground floor the physical or everyday self, and the basement the sexual or subconscious self. The various rooms and how they are decorated and arranged indicate that particular aspect of your life; bathroom—cleansing, eliminating, releasing; dining room—nurturing, fellowship, and so on.

Any vehicle—a car, plane, spacecraft, boat—also represents the self. It is your mode of traveling or being in the world. A car is your physical vehicle and indicates how you are traveling in everyday life. Going backwards, downhill, the wrong way? Got a flat tire? Are you speeding ahead in perfect control? A boat or ship is your emotional vehicle and lets you know what is going on in your emotional life. Are you being tossed upon the seas of life, going up and down? Are you in dry dock? Are you at the helm? Do you have an anchor?

An airplane or any airborne vessel is your spiritual vehicle, and if you are on your way to the airport, you know you are preparing to take off to new spiritual understanding.

A motorcycle or bicycle means you need balance in your life.

Water represents the emotions, fire is purification, air is the spiritual self and earth is the physical self (or degree of grounding).

Once you begin to recognize a few basic symbols, then you begin to look for colors (you do not dream in black and white), clothes, people, scenery, objects, sizes, shapes, numbers, words, letters and so on. Everything has its own significance. Fences or road blocks indicate that creative thinking is needed to get beyond a particular problem that is now facing you. The kind of road on which you find yourself traveling represents how smooth or rough your journey is at present. If you are on a freeway it is easy going. If a bumpy road you are getting there but it is a little rough at present. If you are paving a road you are making your way easier for the future.

Any symbols given to you—whether in fantasy, meditation or guided imagery—are all the same. They are coded messages from self to self. When you “get the picture,” you understand the situation.

You Are The Final Word
Remember that you are always your own best interpreter. You are the final word on the meaning of a symbol for you.

Do not be so gullible that you eagerly accept another’s interpretation. This is giving away power and neglecting the refinement and trust of your own inner resources. If the symbol in the dream dictionary does not feel right, look it up in an unabridged dictionary. Often meanings are there you have never considered before, and a little bell will ring in your head when you read one of them. The definitions offered in this book are generalized and if they do not apply to a specific situation, you need to keep looking, reflecting, and meditating upon a symbol until it reveals its true meaning to you. And by working them out, they become so simple that you know you are always being guided by your own higher self or the God within you.

Common Types of Dreams
Nothing is off limits in the dream state. We are open to experiencing all levels of self, all fears, frustrations, suppressed images, unknown territory, visionary insights. We will become more comfortable with all dream images when we learn to welcome them, whatever they are, as symbolic messengers of self.

There is no such thing as a bad dream symbol. The most grotesque or frightening dreams have the most positive insights once they are worked out. Remember, dream images are just trying to get your attention, so do not resist them. Seek to recognize the insight so you can move on to more joyous awareness. Many people have the following common types of dreams:

Nightmares
A dream known to most all of us is the nightmare. It is one of our most valuable teaching dreams because it shows us a fear that has been blown way out of proportion or something we have suppressed that is affecting us negatively. Often we do not remember the happy dreams. But the frightening ones will make more of an impression and we will be more inclined to work them out.

For example, a man had a recurring nightmare that a large rat was eating away at his neck. He would awaken screaming and clawing at his neck to remove the rat. Upon analysis, he discovered that the neck represented the throat chakra. He was not verbalizing his needs, and the suppression was gnawing away and resulting in self-destructive behaviors. The rat was an insecure part of self that was betraying him. We must always nurture the inner self, taking care to verbalize and express what it is that we want and need. After he began to take assertive steps to resolve these problems both at work and in his personal relationships, the rat dream no longer continued.

Disaster Dreams
Whether earthquakes, flood, fire or tidal wave, a disaster indicates a sudden change in some area of your life. A flood means an emotional upheaval and an earthquake means a big rearrangement in your affairs. They usually indicate turning points or opportunities to take advantage of a new direction. See specific disasters in Part II.

Sexual Dreams
Sex is a big part of many dreams, and usually has little to do with the literal meaning of intercourse. Usually it indicates learning to balance the male and female polarities of our being. Remember that each one of us is both male and female, manifesting itself in a particular body.

To have sexual intercourse in a dream represents a merger of energies. If having intercourse with a man, it is a merger of masculine energies within the self; with a woman it is a merger of feminine energies. If you are a female (or male) and dream of making love with another female (or male) you actually know, it represents taking within the self qualities you associate with the particular individual. Making love with a member of the same sex usually has nothing to do with homosexuality.

Also, having intercourse in a dream with members of your family does not indicate a desire for incest. If making love with your father or mother, it represents a merger of wiser, nurturing qualities of the masculine or feminine self; with a son or daughter, an integration of the more childlike or youthful qualities of self. Remember all persons in the dream are an aspect of you.

A sexual dream accompanied by an orgasm may indicate a need to release and balance physical energy, and this is a way the body has of restoring equilibrium. We must remember that we are physical, sexual beings and this part of the self needs to be honored.

Costume Dreams
If you find yourself in a costume, it usually represents a past life. It may be that a problem you are facing now was the same one you were dealing with in another time and place. Remembering and understanding the dynamics of the costume dream will help you gain a perspective on whatever is presently confronting you.

Direction Dreams
The direction in which you are traveling indicates whether you are on the right track. If you are going up in a dream—up a mountain, up a road, ladder, staircase, elevator, whatever, you are going in the right direction. If you are going down, it is the wrong way. If you are going both up and down, your energy is scattered and you need to get centered. Going around in circles speaks for itself. If you are going to the right, you are following the path of intuition and guidance. To the left is the intellect and reason.

One man asked if he should participate in a conference and got a dream showing him riding on a down escalator, so steep that he had to heave his briefcase in front of him in order to hold on. Wrong direction, not in support of his study and projects at hand. Another example: a woman was considering the purchase of a certain automobile. She was shown the car sitting down at the bottom of a hill, and she had to walk down crowded streets to get there. She did not buy the car, and a much better offer came up within a few days.

Flying
Flying dreams are great fun, and usually mean you are consciously out of the body. If you can gain control of a flying dream you are free to go anywhere you like. You may think yourself in different places in time/space and instantly be there, or you may transcend dimensions. If you are flying around and then start losing altitude or think you are going to crash, it simply suggests that you have a fear of exploring higher dimensions and breaking out of limits. Try again the next night.

Falling
If you dream you are falling, you are probably having a bad landing coming back into the body. We all leave the body at night. If you jerk as you are dozing off, it is a bad exit. If you wake up and cannot move or talk, it means you are half in and half out of the body. We cannot move until we are totally in. Think yourself down to your feet. This will ground you.

We leave the body at night, or transcend physical awareness, to be taught and trained. The physical or third dimension is illusion; the dream state is reality. Through meditation and working with dreams you will never fear death as you will experience the fourth dimension and be as comfortable there as you are in the third dimension here.

Obscene Dreams
Nothing in a dream is obscene once you understand the meaning. Nothing is meant to insult you or offend you, but to get you to look at a level of self or limitation that you have avoided. Work it out and usually you will find a great deal of humor behind it.

Recurring Dreams
Like a movie rerun, there is a message you are not seeing. Recurring nightmares mean that you have not dealt with a particular fear. Recurring fence or barricade dreams mean there is a limit you imposed upon yourself that you have not yet recognized and removed. These are most important to write down and work out. Once you get the message they will stop.

Snake Dreams
Snakes frequently appear in dreams, and are power symbols. They represent the kundalini energy, or life force. One woman dreamed that a snake entered her lower body and moved up through the body trunk to the throat. The snake stuck in her throat, and she started choking. She awakened horrified. At first glance this does seem a bit unnerving, but actually it was a perfect explanation of what was happening in her life. The kundalini power is housed at the base of the spine. So the snake enters her body and begins to move upward. As we awaken energy it moves up through the various chakras. Her energy was flowing well until it reached the throat center, and there it stopped, causing choking. She was blocking energy in that center, and not verbalizing her needs and feelings. She was choking off communication because of fear and a poor self-image. This dream explained that her inner power was alive and well, and through releasing the blocks in the throat center by verbalizing and not suppressing she would get past present limitations in relationships with others.

Money Dreams
When you dream of coins or dollar bills, it represents changes coming into your life. Small coins, small change. Lots of bills, big changes.

Toilet Dreams
These dreams concern how well we are taking care of our inner garbage. Are we letting go of unneeded thoughts and experiences? Are we releasing the past so that we are able to live fully in the present? Difficulty in elimination or constipation indicates suppression. Diarrhea suggests forced elimination whether ready or not, and we are out of control in the process. A stopped up toilet means you are not releasing, flushing out negativity and wastes.

I had a dream with three stopped up toilets sitting out in the open. This was letting me know that I had to clean up my act mentally, physically and emotionally. I was now aware of things to do, priorities to establish, because the toilets were totally exposed for all to see.

Blood and Guts Dreams
Blood in a dream means loss of energy. If you are being stabbed, note the area of the body and check the corresponding chakra to see how you are losing energy. If you are being murdered or are murdering someone else, you are killing off a part of the self. This may be an aspect no longer needed, or a part that you are failing to nurture that is still valuable to self-growth.

Death Dreams:
A death means the ending of the old and making way for the new. A death seldom means a literal death. Rather it suggests the dying of a part of self necessary in the process of growth and regeneration. It may also mean you are dead inside and need to awaken feelings and sensitivity. So check carefully the symbols in the dream to get the message.

Chase Dreams. If you are being chased, or trying to run away from something, you are avoiding looking at a problem. If you cannot get your legs to move or are moving in slow motion, you will soon have to confront the fear you have been avoiding. When you are being chased, you are putting yourself through unnecessary anguish and pain. Remember to turn around and confront whatever aspect of self is chasing you, make peace with it, and the drama will end.... Dreampedia


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