formula

The meaning of Formula in dream | Dream interpretation


Solution to a problem is at hand. Develop a plan to accomplish your goals. Also, need to organize, plan and gain clarity on your life direction.

The Dream Books Symbols | Betty Bethards

A dream of anything prepared from a formula is a happy omen in regard to your love and/ or sex life.

The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams | Stearn Robinson - Tom Corbett

Dreams of a formula signify that you are about cracking the code and finding the answers you desire. See Code.

Strangest Dream Explanations | Dream Explanations - Anonymous

You are in a race to get to the finish line. Remember it is the tortoise that always finishes first; haste makes waste. See Car, Race and Competition.

Strangest Dream Explanations | Dream Explanations - Anonymous

1. Plans and ideas.

2. A good omen for romance and inti­mate affairs.

3. The knowledge of what must be done to correct a problem or difficulty.

New American Dream Dictionary | Joan Seaman - Tom Philbin


Formula 1 | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Formula


REASONING

Given in order to formulate an analysis... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

BASMALAH - BISMALAH

(arb.) Calling the Name of God Almighty in a dream means blessed tidings. Basmalah in a dream also represents attainment, knowledge, guidance and wealth. Reciting the formula ‘Bismillahi Rahmani Raheem’ (In the Name ofAllah, the Merciful, the Compassionate) in a dream also means living to see one’s children and grand children. It also means recovering a lost article. Basmala in a dream also means placing the intention to get married, tidings of a good progeny, and receiving guidance after heedlessness.

If one writes down such a call ‘In the Name of God’ with a beautiful handwriting in his dream, it means that he will receive wealth and recognition in his field of knowledge.

If a deceased person writes it in one’s dream, it means that such a person dwells encompassed with God’s mercy.

If the one who wrote it in the dream is alive and if he erases it or if a bird steals it from him in the dream, it means the nearing of his death and exhaustion of his sustenance in this world.

If one recites it during his prayers in a dream when it is not his custom to do so, it means borrowing an unnecessary amount of money or giving preference to leaning toward one’s mother rather than his father or the opposite.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

EXALTING GOD’S ONENESS

Exalting God’s oneness and sovereignty in a dream means receiving financial compensation for pain and suffering.

To utter the Exalting God’s oneness and sovereignty in a dream means receiving financial compensation for pain and suffering.

To utter the formula: ‘La ilahe: il Allah’’ (there is no god other than Allah) in a dream means that one will only die having faith in his Lord.

(Also see Exclamation of God’s Sovereignty)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

EXCLAMATION OF GOD’S SOVEREIGNTY

In a dream, exclamation of God’s sovereignty, i.e., uttering the formula “La Hawla Wa La Quwwata Ilia Billah” (There is no will or power except that of God’s Almighty) means constant repentance in wakefulness and hope for salvation. It also means conquering one’s enemies.

(Also see Exalting God’s oneness)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

RESPONDING

(arb. Talbiyah) Responding to a call, or uttering and repeating a formula “Labbaiha Alliihumma Labbaik,” during the pilgrimage season in a dream means that one will capture his enemy and bring him to justice. Loud answering to a call in a dream means complaining before ajudge, and winning the case thereafter.

(Also see Hajj; Feast of Immolation; Pilgrimage)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

ARCHBISHOP

Rules and formulas to be followed. Are the rules reasonable and accurate or is someone trying to control you? Could it be by your own belief in restrictions? Who is being holier than thou? Rules have their place as in the formula for water; H20 is the rule that is followed to create water. Nothing else will do.

If you are not trying to create water, you need not follow that rule or be held by it. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Y-SHAPE

The letter 44Y” unites the masculine and the feminine. It also represents the dowsing rod that is used to find something hidden.

The “Y” also represents a magical formula where one becomes two and two become one.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

BLACKBOARD

(see School, Signage, Writing)

Life’s important lessons—the ones that we return to regularly to determine our actions and reactions.

Structured learning and accumulated knowledge.

A common dream appearing to students during exam time. In this case, what’s on the blackboard is likely a reflection of those studies.

A formula appearing on a blackboard often refers to the solution to some conflict or problem. Try to find a way to translate the pictographs into positive actions.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

MATHEMATICS

Vision: Dreaming about a mathematical formula means you are facing a very tricky assignment—but rest assured you will make it.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

CHURCH BUILDINGS

also see Church in Dream Dictionary: Religious Buildings and Religious Imagery

To dream of church buildings can imply we are formulating a new set of values or morals. It may also mean we are abandoning old, outdated beliefs.... Dream Meanings and Dream Interpretation

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Dream Meanings and Dream Interpretation

PUBLICIST

Dreams of a publicist symbolize your inner advocate and champion. This dream is revealing your healthy -esteem and belief in yourself, which is the winning formula to true success. See Cheerleader.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

TOOLS

Dreams of tools signify your street smarts and coping mechanisms for life, your resources, and formula for handling challenges.

If your tools are in good shape, then you are prepared to take on your life challenges.

If your tools are broken or ineffective, this dream is telling you that it’s time to learn a whole new set of tools. Keep in mind that every challenge you face affords you a new opportunity to discover a new tool. See Shed, Hammer, Drill or Screwdriver.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

OUTLINE

Psychological / emotional perspective: An outline is usually a brief statement of intent, and with practice in dreams we are often able to formulate such a statement.

An outline document in dreams can symbolize this.

The problem is that when we wake up, unless we are used to recording our dreams, such a statement of intended action can be lost.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

RETREAT

Psychological / emotional perspective: When we dream of retreating from something we may need to decide whether it is a forced withdrawal or a strategic move.

If the former then we may be under pressure, if the latter then we must formulate new plans.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

DO YOUR DREAMS HAVE A MEANING?

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter. The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us. A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general. In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‘one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm’), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2] As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction. The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated. To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject. But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature -- for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked. In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds: I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‘research workers on dreams’, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‘Les savants ne sont pas curieux’, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it! And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes: Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‘interpretation of dreams’ is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

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About Dream Interpretation

DO YOUR DREAMS MEAN ANYTHING?

The Scientific Literature of Dream-Problems

I shall begin by giving a short account of the views of earlier writers on this subject and of the status of the dream-problem in contemporary science; since in the course of this treatise, I shall not often have occasion to refer to either. In spite of thousands of years of endeavour, little progress has been made in the scientific understanding of dreams. This fact has been so universally acknowledged by previous writers on the subject that it seems hardly necessary to quote individual opinions.

The reader will find, in many stimulating observations, and plenty of interesting material relating to our subject, but little or nothing that concerns the true nature of the dream, or that solves definitely any of its enigmas.

The educated layman, of course, knows even less of the matter.

The conception of the dream that was held in prehistoric ages by primitive peoples, and the influence which it may have exerted on the formation of their conceptions of the universe, and of the soul, is a theme of such great interest that it is only with reluctance that I refrain from dealing with it in these pages. I will refer the reader to the well-known works of Sir John Lubbock (Lord Avebury), Herbert Spencer, E. B. Tylor and other writers; I will only add that we shall not realise the importance of these problems and speculations until we have completed the task of dream interpretation that lies before us.

A reminiscence of the concept of the dream that was held in primitive times seems to underlie the evaluation of the dream which was current among the peoples of classical antiquity.[1] They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons. Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.

The extraordinary variations in the content of dreams, and in the impressions which they produced on the dreamer, made it, of course, very difficult to formulate a coherent conception of them, and necessitated manifold differentiations and group-formations, according to their value and reliability.

The valuation of dreams by the individual philosophers of antiquity naturally depended on the importance which they were prepared to attribute to manticism in general.

In the two works of Aristotle in which there is mention of dreams, they are already regarded as constituting a problem of psychology. We are told that the dream is not god-sent, that it is not of divine but of daimonic origin.

For nature is really daimonic, not divine; that is to say, the dream is not a supernatural revelation, but is subject to the laws of the human spirit, which has, of course, a kinship with the divine.

The dream is defined as the psychic activity of the sleeper, inasmuch as he is asleep. Aristotle was acquainted with some of the characteristics of the dream-life; for example, he knew that a dream converts the slight sensations perceived in sleep into intense sensations (‰_÷one imagines that one is walking through fire, and feels hot, if this or that part of the body becomes only quite slightly warm‰_ª), which led him to conclude that dreams might easily betray to the physician the first indications of an incipient physical change which escaped observation during the day.[2]

As has been said, those writers of antiquity who preceded Aristotle did not regard the dream as a product of the dreaming psyche, but as an inspiration of divine origin, and in ancient times, the two opposing tendencies which we shall find throughout the ages in respect of the evaluation of the dream-life, were already perceptible.

The ancients distinguished between the true and valuable dreams which were sent to the dreamer as warnings, or to foretell future events, and the vain, fraudulent and empty dreams, whose object was to misguide him or lead him to destruction.

The pre-scientific conception of the dream which obtained among the ancients was, of course, in perfect keeping with their general conception of the universe, which was accustomed to project as an external reality that which possessed reality only in the life of the psyche. Further, it accounted for the main impression made upon the waking life by the morning memory of the dream; for in this memory the dream, as compared with the rest of the psychic content, seems to be something alien, coming, as it were, from another world. It would be an error to suppose that the theory of the supernatural origin of dreams lacks followers even in our own times; for quite apart from pietistic and mystical writers -- who cling, as they are perfectly justified in doing, to the remnants of the once predominant realm of the supernatural until these remnants have been swept away by scientific explanation -- we not infrequently find that quite intelligent persons, who in other respects are averse to anything of a romantic nature, go so far as to base their religious belief in the existence and co-operation of superhuman spiritual powers on the inexplicable nature of the phenomena of dreams (Haffner).

The validity ascribed to the dream life by certain schools of philosophy -- for example, by the school of Schelling -- is a distinct reminiscence of the undisputed belief in the divinity of dreams which prevailed in antiquity; and for some thinkers, the mantic or prophetic power of dreams is still a subject of debate. This is due to the fact that the explanations attempted by psychology are too inadequate to cope with the accumulated material, however strongly the scientific thinker may feel that such superstitious doctrines should be repudiated.

To write a history of our scientific knowledge of the dream problem is extremely difficult, because, valuable though this knowledge may be in certain respects, no real progress in a definite direction is as yet discernible. No real foundation of verified results has hitherto been established on which future investigators might continue to build. Every new author approaches the same problems afresh, and from the very beginning.

If I were to enumerate such authors in chronological order, giving a survey of the opinions which each has held concerning the problems of the dream, I should be quite unable to draw a clear and complete picture of the present state of our knowledge on the subject. I have therefore preferred to base my method of treatment on themes rather than on authors, and in attempting the solution of each problem of the dream, I shall cite the material found in the literature of the subject.

But as I have not succeeded in mastering the whole of this literature - for it is widely dispersed and interwoven with the literature of other subjects -- I must ask my readers to rest content with my survey as it stands, provided that no fundamental fact or important point of view has been overlooked.

In a supplement to a later German edition, the author adds:

I shall have to justify myself for not extending my summary of the literature of dream problems to cover the period between first appearance of this book and the publication of the second edition. This justification may not seem very satisfactory to the reader; none the less, to me it was decisive.

The motives which induced me to summarise the treatment of dreams in the literature of the subject have been exhausted by the foregoing introduction; to have continued this would have cost me a great deal of effort and would not have been particularly useful or instructive.

For the interval in question -- a period of nine years -- has yielded nothing new or valuable as regards the conception of dreams, either in actual material or in novel points of view. In most of the literature which has appeared since the publication of my own work, the latter has not been mentioned or discussed; it has, of course, received the least attention from the so-called ‰_÷research workers on dreams‰_ª, who have thus afforded a brilliant example of the aversion to learning anything new so characteristic of the scientist. ‰_÷Les savants ne sont pas curieux‰_ª, said the scoffer, Anatole France.

If there were such a thing in science as the right of revenge, I, in my turn, should be justified in ignoring the literature which has appeared since the publication of this book.

The few reviews which have appeared in the scientific journals are so full of misconceptions and lack of comprehension that my only possible answer to my critics would be a request that they should read this book over again -- or perhaps merely that they should read it!

And in a supplement to the fourth German edition which appeared in 1914, a year after I published the first English translation of this work, he writes:

Since then, the state of affairs has certainly undergone a change; my contribution to the ‰_÷interpretation of dreams‰_ª is no longer ignored in the literature of the subject. But the new situation makes it even more impossible to continue the foregoing summary.

The Interpretation of Dreams has evoked a whole series of new contentions and problems, which have been expounded by the authors in the most varied fashions. But I cannot discuss these works until I have developed the theories to which their authors have referred. Whatever has appeared to me as valuable in this recent literature, I have accordingly reviewed in the course of the following exposition.... About Dream Interpretation

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About Dream Interpretation

EAST

A dream in which this direction is the main fea- ture indicates the formula- tion, or cancellation, of a plan involving an impor- tant change of location.

See also Compass.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

PERSPIRATION

This dream is reminding you that the formula for success is inspiration plus perspiration, so don’t rest on your oars; if you want to enjoy the rewards, you’ll have to endure the efforts:... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

RECIPE

A recipe featured in your dream is telling you that all work and no play is a good formula for a nervous breakdown, and all play and no work is a likely road to ruin; try to get your proportions in balance.

See also Cooking.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

ACCIDENT

The accident may be a car crash, a careless dropping of a brick on someone’s head, or just slipping on a banana skin. Whatever it is, you have to ask who is the victim of the accident and (where applicable) who caused it? Usually it will be you, or some aspect of you.

(1) If the accident in the dream involves only you - if, for example, it is a repeat of some accident diat actually happened to you - then ask yourself: am I accident prone? If you are, the dream may be expressing your worries about this accident proneness. It may also be asking you to do something about it.

Accidents are often less accidental than we think.

If there were no unconscious dimension to the human psyche, then we would be justified in speaking of ‘pure accidents’ - unless we subscribe to the notion of some implacable God or fate that causes them. But if we accept the existence of unconscious drives, unconscious desires and motivations, then what otherwise we might properly call accidents may be seen as misfortunes we have brought upon ourselves. We may, at an unconscious level, be playing the martyr or punishing ourselves for imagined guilt. Docs any of this apply to you? If so, try to discover - ask your unconscious to reveal - the cause of your neurotic selfpunishment. The cause will almost certainly turn out to be not so much a fact as a fantasy, and any factual element in it will almost certainly be quite innocuous and innocent. If, for instance, you concluded that the cause of your guilt-feelings and consequent masochism was connected with your father’s death, was it really you who killed him? Or if you think the cause is a childhood sexual desire for your mother or father, isn’t that a natural part of human development, and therefore blameless?

(2) If the dream strikes you powerfully as a premonition, act accordingly. Avoid whatever action might expose you to an accident of the kind depicted in the dream.

(3) If the accident happens to someone else in your dream, you have to decide who that person is or, alternatively, what part of yourself is represented by that person.

If the victim is identifiable as someone in real life, then, no matter how close the person is to you and no matter how much you love that person, you should consider the possibility that the dream is expressing an unconscious hostile wish or resentment towards that person. Even if the dream makes you anxious for the safety or well-being of the person, it may be that the anxiety is a cloak for repressed antagonism towards him or her. Feelings and desires arc repressed because they are felt to be unacceptable. But, however disgusting or morally reprehensible those feelings or desires may appear to you, it is better to face up to them in the clear light of consciousness than to leave them to brood and breed in the dark cellars of the unconscious. What is repressed does not cease to exist (what is out of sight is not out of mind!); nor does it cease to function negatively and destructively.

Siblings, as well as parents and spouse, are likely objects of jealousy and even of uncharitable death-wishes. For siblings, see also Brother / Sister; for parents, see also Father, Mother.

(4) Dream accidents of a rather different kind may be mere reviewings of actual happenings: forgetting your spouse’s / parent’s / sibling’s birthday, or failing to do in a certain situation what you normally do in that situation (e.g. complimenting a person on his or her looks or performance). What may appear to be accidental may, in fact, be the effect of an unconscious cause (see (1) above), and the dream’s repetition of the ‘absentmindedness’ or ‘inexplicable lapse of memory* may, in fact, be a prompting from your unconscious to get some inner conflict sorted out.

On the other hand, such dreams may be pure anxiety dreams, representing your fear of making such a slip. Remember, though, that anxiety can cloak unconscious anger, and it is anxiety that causes repression. (Freud began by saying that repression causes anxiety; but he later reversed that formula.) See also Anxiety.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

AUDIENCE

Opportunity to express yourself and be heard; diverse parts of self are receptive to integration and direction, so goals may be formulated and new adventures begun.

If audience is not listening, parts of yourself are unwilling to hear and respond to needed changes. You have to get their attention through self-love and acceptance.... The Dream Books Symbols

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The Dream Books Symbols

TRAPPED

This dream is probably expressing how you feel in real life. Perhaps, you are trapped by marriage, dependence on your parents, or in a job without future. In this case you need to reformulate some aspects of your own situation. On the other hand, you might be trapped on your own conservatism or obstinacy.

If you change the way you do things, you will surely experience a feeling of liberation.

Gypsy tradition says that if you dream that an animal is caught in a net you must act with caution. Otherwise, your plans will fail.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

ANGEL

Angels are major archetypal energies that were here before us. Over many thousands of years, humankind has formulated these huge energetic sensations into specific beings that appear in many religious and spiritual disciplines. These beings can appear in dreams and are evidence of a highly evolved moment in your spiritual development. Angels are also symbolic of divine intervention in process, where miraculous turns of events can occur through being guarded from a high level.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

E-MAIL

E-mail is the communication venue of the new world order. We are simultaneously brought closer together and further isolated by this almost instantaneous way of connecting our thoughts to the minds of other people.

The realm of the intellect is represented by this image.

The newness of Internet technology imbues the symbolic meaning with a sense of uncharted territory in the world of thought and interpersonal expression. We live in a time where the technology has evolved faster than our ability to formulate a universal sense of etiquette and propriety. Its speed implies spontaneity. However, the ability to edit and alter our words prior to sending the finished product adds a dimension of control that should not be overlooked when arriving at an accurate interpretation. Words typically account for about 20 percent of any verbal interaction. Absent from the e-mail experience are the crucial elements of tone and body language. Despite this enormous limitation, most people approach e- mails as if they were clear and accurate when, in fact, they are subject to projection and presumption. In this way, an e-mail in a dream connects to communication that is assumed to be lucid but may not be received with the same intention with which it was sent.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

MERMAID

The mermaid is a mythological creature with the torso of a woman and the lower half of a fish. In this way, she is an archetypal figure that embodies the feminine principle coupled with the capacity to connect to the unconscious mind and the emotional realms. In modern media, the mermaid has been transformed into something lovely and beguiling; however, her origins are dark and are associated with peril, death, and seduction.

A dream that features a mermaid should be considered aspirational, and you must keep in mind all of her qualities, light and dark, when formulating an interpretation. In any case, such a dream is connecting you to the spiritual side of your nature.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

PREGNANCY

You are formulating a new idea, project, or direction in your life.

A pregnancy represents the appearance of something new on the horizon. All ideas, changes in direction, and physical shifts must first be created in the vat of ideas within the mind. Everything that we create in life is first felt as the spark of a new thought. To dream of pregnancy is to be connecting powerfully to this part of the creative process. Consider that something in you or your life is about to change dramatically.

Dreaming of pregnancy is not relegated to women alone—men will often dream of being pregnant. Many men report such dreams when their significant other is literally preparing to give birth, and in the dream world, this represents the dramatic change of life that is about to take place as fatherhood descends upon them. Shame or fear of being exposed as pregnant because it is unwanted connects to uncertainty of how the shift in you may be perceived by others in your life.

The closer the pregnancy is to birth, the more imminent the change that is germinating.

If the pregnancy is experienced by a character within your dream, then consider that it is an element of your personality as represented by that character aspect that is undergoing the change that is afoot.

If the term of the pregnancy is clear in the dream, you might want to consider what was going on in your life at the time conception would have been likely. For example, if you were seven months pregnant in your dream, look back seven months in your life for some new element that could be making itself known at this time.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

INFLUENTIAL PEOPLE IN WORLD HISTORY

Certain key figures in human history have had such an impact on world history that your unconscious may have stored the information—perhaps from school or college days, or even from a documentary or media report—and then drawn upon that knowledge to create an image that can encourage, teach or inspire you in dreamland. The list below contains some of the world’s most influential figures and gives keywords to trigger personal associations. Please note that the list is by no means comprehensive or definitive; if the influential person in your dreams isn’t listed here or in this chapter and you want to find associations that have meaning and relevance to you, it might be worthwhile reading their biography or autobiography, or investigating their life story and significance to world history.

Alexander the Great: Conqueror, empire building, warrior archetype.

Aristotle: İnfluential greek philosopher, the importance of asking questions and challenging conventional thought.

Bell, Alexander Graham: İnventor of telephone, communication, networking .

Bonaparte, Napoleon: French emperor, tactician, warrior archetype, exile.

Columbus, Christopher: Explorer, led europe to the americas, new territories to discover, new potential.

Confucius: The founder of confucianism, wise old man archetype.

Copernicus, Nicolas: Priest, astronomer, taught heliocentricity, the world revolves around the sun.

Daguerre, Louis: Pioneer of photography, vision, impressions, image change.

Darwin, Charles: Biologist, formulated theory of evolution, survival of the fittest.

Descartes, René: Rationalist philosopher and mathematician, logic, reason, ı think therefore ı am.

Edison, Thomas: İnventor of light bulb, illumination, insight.

Einstein, Albert: Physicist, theory of relativity, greatness achieved by power of the mind.

Fermi, Enrico: Father of atomic bomb, ultimate weapon of destruction, the last resort.

Fleming, Alexander: Penicillin, advances in bacteriology, immunology and chemotherapy, strengthening your defenses.

Ford, Henry: İndustrialist, revolutionized mass production, the repetition of the production line.

Galilei, Galileo: Catholic astronomer, accurately described heliocentric solar system, visionary, conflict of authority with freedom of thought.

Gutenberg, Johann: Developed movable type, printed bibles, communication, the printed word.

Machiavelli, Niccolò: Author of the prince, archetype of the manipulator.

Marconi, Guglielmo: İnventor of the radio, communication, words, reaching a large audience.

Marx, Karl: Social philosopher, marxist communism, class struggle.

Michelangelo: Painter; sculptor, architect, diversity, energy, talent.

Moses: God’s messenger, leader of people out of slavery.

Muhammad: Prophet of ıslam, founder of major world religion, military and political leader, pure ideals, indomitable will.

Newton, Isaac: Physicist, theory of universal gravitation, laws of motion, universe working like clockwork.

St Paul: Proselytizer of christianity, dogma, tradition, rules and regulations.

Plato: Greek philosopher, intellectual focus on spiritual concepts rather than physical elements of life.

Shakespeare, William: Playwright, understanding of complete range of human emotions, stupendous output.

Voltaire: Writer and philosopher, crusade against tyranny and bigotry, the importance of tolerance.

Washington, George: First president of the united states of america, the basic rights of the individual, david versus goliath.

Watt, James: Developer of steam engine, new possibilities, travel.

William the Conqueror: First king of modern england, beginning a new project, invasion.

Wright, Orville and Wilbur: Inventors of airplane, longing to escape, fly away or reach new heights... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

BLACK AND WHITE DREAMS

To dream in black and white suggests that you need to be more objective in formulating your decisions. You may be a little too unyielding in your thought processes, and thus need to find some sort of balance between two opposing views. Consider the views and opinions of others. Alternatively, black and white dreams may be a sign of depression or sadness. You may feel that there is not enough excitement in your life.

It is a quite commonly held belief that we only dream in black and white, but many people are able to identify tones of color in their dreams.

If this is the case, why is it believed that we only dream in black and white? It may be because dreams that appear to be black and white only appear so because the color is not relevant. This doesn’t necessarily mean, however, that such dreams are in black and white. Black and white is a function of television when the color information is removed, but the same is not true of the mind. For example, grass might not be green in a dream, but it’s not gray as it is in a black and white movie; the color simply is not relevant and your unconscious isn’t highlighting it. This non-relevance fools the conscious mind on waking up into concluding that, by implication, the dream must have been in black and white.

A black funeral may suggest difficulties in, or the need for a new approach to, a relationship or work issue, as the current approach is doomed. Or are you grieving for a phase or aspect of your life that has recently come to an end? As stated above, black often represents the death of new ideas, so could your dream be telling you to prepare for the transition? Black animals that appear in dreams are usually associated with notions of temptation, unconscious drives and urges, whilst black clothes and underwear are a symbol of hidden or unconscious feelings, or sexuality. A night dream scene shrouded in darkness may relate to a certain lack of direction in your waking life. According to traditional symbolism, black is also associated with wickedness, so if you are menaced by a person wearing black in your dream, could the dream be a depiction of your darkest fears. Do you worry that someone is a threat to you or are you your own worst enemy?

Keywords: the unknown, the unconscious, danger, mystery, darkness, death, mourning, hate and malice.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

FOOD

Physically, food nourishes the body. Mentally, knowledge nourishes the mind, thus the old adage of ‘food for thought’. In the universal language of mind, food represents an experience of a type of energy to be taken in. The preparation of food represents the formulation and creation of something important, and the consumption of food represents the taking in of knowledge.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

NUTS AND SEEDS

Although less juicy then fruits, nuts are equally nutritious and satisfying, sharing fruit’s general symbolism of reward, fertility and well-being. And because their edible parts are encased in hard shells, they also denote wisdom and insight that may be hidden or yet to be discovered. To dream that you are gathering nuts could suggest success in business and in love. You may also be trying to get to the core of a matter or situation. To dream that you are eating nuts signifies prosperity and attainment of your desires, but if you dreamed of exerting enormous force to crack open a nut, your unconscious may have been referring to someone in your waking life who is a tough nut, presenting a hard face to the world whilst possessing a tender interior. Alternatively, it may signify some project in your life that is proving to be a tough nut to crack. Bear in mind also that your unconscious may have been making a reference to testicles or ’nuts’, or was reflecting the current craziness of your waking life. Consider also the association with health, as in a ’health nut’, or feeling passionate or nuts about something.

Your dreaming mind may also home in on a particular nut and if it does there may be a sexual connotation. Almonds, for example, resemble female genitalia and because the almond is a symbol of the Virgin Mary, they may also denote virginity or innocence. Bear in mind, too, the phrase ’almond eyed’, which indicates a perceptive individual. Although most nuts symbolize masculine sexuality, the walnut does so more than others, suggesting fertility in particular. To see or eat filbert nuts in your dream signifies peace, harmony and profitable business ventures. Nutmeg indicates a basic natural ability or talent you may be unaware that you have. A nutcracker will exemplify a need for solutions or resolution, whilst a nutshell relates to the shells you use in waking life to protect yourself. A nutshell may also indicate a need to consolidate your beliefs into a basic, simple formula. To see a nut tree in your dream signifies happiness and rewarding experiences in waking life.

Dreams of seeds or kernels pertain to your inner talents and abilities. Other interpretations include: the beginning of something or the completion of a phase or cycle, mission accomplished, fertility and going to seed. They may also be a homonym for ’cede’, or surrendering. Sunflower seeds suggest the emergence of spiritual joy, pumpkin seeds stand for opportunities to express yourself in waking life, hemp seeds refer to a strong or powerful factor in your life and flax seeds signify a way of life that offers multiple benefits.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

INTERPRETING YOUR DREAMS

Interpreting your dreams can be a lot of fun. As we’ve said, it can also give you valuable insight. Dreams are like coded messages from your unconscious mind. When you decode them, you gain access to a wealth of intuitive wisdom.

Remember that only you can interpret your dreams. Many people have published “Dream Dictionaries” that describe what each part of the dream symbolizes. Actually, the same dream can have infinite meanings, depending on the person who dreamed it. The important thing is, what does it mean to YOU?

Interpreting dreams isn’t something you can pick up and become an expert at right away. It takes time and practice. First, keep the following things in mind:

  • Dreams are the reaction of the inner self to daytime activity and often show the way out of the dilemma. So relate them to current activity, because dreams may be retrospective as well as prospective.
  • Observe carefully recurrent dreams, as well as the serially progressive ones. These often illustrate progress or failure.
  • Be practical in your interpretations. Always look first for a lesson. What have you refused to face or been ignoring?
  • Dreams come to guide and help, not to amuse. They direct your attention to errors of omission and commission and offer encouragement for right endeavors. They also give us the opportunity to pray for others and to help them bear their burdens.
  • Look for past-life experiences in your dreams. These manifest themselves not only in color, but in the proper costume and setting of their period. They come to warn you against repeating the same old mistakes; to explain your relationship and reactions to certain people and places; to reduce your confusions; to enable you to better understand life.
  • Dreams that are unchanged through the years indicate the dreamer’s resistance to change.The difficulty most people have with interpreting their own dreams is that they aren’t objective enough. Their familiarity with the people and places in their dreams obscures the dreams meaning. Experts have come up with the “I AM and I NEED” formula, devised to overcome this. Here’s how it works.
    Once you have your dream written on paper, get two different colored pens. Using one color, underline every negative word or phrase in the dream which indicates limitation, disrespect, containment, avoidance or damage.
    Using the other color, underline every positive word or phrase. You now make two lists. List the negative words and phrases under a column titled I AM. List the positive words and phrases under a column titled I NEED. You are almost ready to interpret your dream.

Determine the subject matter of the dream. The location where the dream takes place is one of the best methods for doing this. When you have determined the subject matter take each of the phrases or words in the ‘I AM’ column and fit them into the following sentence.

When it comes to my (subject matter)
I AM (phrase or keyword)

Change the phrase or keyword slightly to force the sentence to make sense. If you cannot determine the subject matter apply the keywords to yourself in general. This exercise tells you how you feel or react to the subject matter of the dream. When you have done this read through the ‘I NEED’ column to learn what you must do to correct the problem. To get the meaning put each of the phrases or keywords into the sentence,

When it comes to my (subject matter)
I NEED (phrase or keyword)

Let’s take an example. Using the sentence ‘The dead woman lay on the cold hard slab’. The negative keywords are; dead, cold and hard. Women, in dreams, can represent emotions so in this case the sentences constructed would be

  • When it comes to my emotions I am dead.
  • When it comes to my emotions I am cold.
  • When it comes to my emotions I am hard.

The meaning is obvious. With analyzing just one sentence from a dream we have learned a lot about the dreamer. Using this technique you now have all of the information you need to start interpreting your dreams. However it takes practice to be able to apply what you have learned. Be patient with your efforts.

Not all dream interpretations will be that cut and dried, but it is a way to remain objective when you are analyzing what your dreams mean and how best to put the messages they are conveying to good use in your life.

Keep in mind that Most dreams are * NOT * precognitive, and once one learns the subtle differences between a precognitive dream versus a regular dream, they are easily discernable and will put your mind at ease.

The first thing everyone should consider is the typical universal symbology of the dream images. For instance, death symbolizes the end of something that’s ready for change, and a new beginning. Most people start out highly resistive to changes of any sort, and see any upcoming change in their life as something foreboding and scary. Death dreams are usually about change.

The symbols and what they represent is the most fascinating part of dream interpretation. There are literally hundreds of them. We don’t have the space to address ALL of them, but we will touch on some of the most recurring themes in dreams as well as the symbols of those dreams and what they mean.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

A SHORT HISTORY OF DREAMING

Dreams, it seems, have fascinated the entire human race from earliest times. And until quite recently, most cultures have set great store by dreams. For example, in ancient Egypt the high priests used dreams for prophecies. There still exists a papyrus book of dreams dating back approximately 3,500 years in which dream symbols are interpreted, proving that the Egyptians took their dreams seriously.

In ancient Greece, people believed that dreams were a direct contact with the gods. One of the principal uses of dreams was for healing. Sick people went to special temples that were dedicated to dreaming as a curative method. There, a physician would help to induce a dream, which the physician would then interpret as a guide to the treatment of the ailment, and its cause as well. In modern times, the father of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, drew upon the writings of Artemidorus, a Greek who lived in the second century B.C.E. whom Freud much admired. Artemidorus’s books have been preserved for over two thousand years and were in constant use as references before the scientific revolution put dreams into the category of “unimportant nonsense.”

At the time of the Italian Renaissance, when rational thinking was beginning to come to the fore, dreams began to be dismissed as trivial by-products of sleep. William Shakespeare denounced dreams as “the children of an idle brain.” (On the other hand, he wrote eloquently on the nature of dreams in his play Hamlet!) John Dryden, an English philosopher, dismissed dreams as the result of indigestion or infection. The bias against dreams continued through the nineteenth century, when most people thought that dreams were caused by some external stimulus—such as a knock on the door making a person dream the house was being burglarized. Aside from such shallow interpretation, most ordinary people, doctors and philosophers, church fathers and professors, believed that dreams had no meaning and saw no need to heed them.

In his autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Dr. Jung tells of a dream in which he was a guest at a garden party. Another guest was a woman from the town of Basel, a good friend of both Jung and his sister. In the dream, Jung says, he instinctively knew the woman from Basel would die. However, when he woke up he had no idea who the woman was in real life, though the dream was exceptionally vivid. He writes, “A few weeks later, I received news that a friend of mine had a fatal accident. I knew at once that she was the person I had seen in the dream but had been unable to identify.”

It took the work of Sigmund Freud to open people’s eyes once more to the possibility of dreams being important and useful. Though Freud was obsessed with sexual meanings in dreams to the exclusion of all else, he performed a useful service with the publication of his book on dream interpretation. However, his narrow view held that dreams were mere “wish fulfillment” and a substitute for sexual satisfaction. Fortunately, one of his student colleagues, Carl Gustav Jung of Switzerland, disagreed with Freud and formulated a more comprehensive theory of dream analysis.

Jung researched the previously unstudied territory of the unconscious and came up with the idea of a collective unconscious, through which all people were connected by a common store of knowledge and experience that often revealed itself in dreams.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

ACTIVATION-SYNTHESIS MODEL OF DREAMING

The activation-synthesis model of dreaming was proposed in 1977 by Robert McCarley and J. Allan Hobson of Harvard Medical School. Examining the purely physiological correlates of dreaming, Hobson and McCarley believed they had put forward a hypothesis that refuted the notion that dreams are meaningful, especially as this notion was formulated by Sigmund Freud and promulgated in the tradition of dream interpretation he initiated.

During rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the stage of sleep most closely connected with dreaming, a portion of the brain called the pons (located in the primitive hindbrain) generates electrical signals that go to many different brain areas, including those associated with motor activities, sensory activities, and conscious thought. Hobson and McCarley hypothesized that one of the effects of this electrical activity is to send a series of essentially random images, feelings, and so forth to the higher mental centers of the forebrain. This is the “activation” stage of the theory.

In normal waking consciousness, the fore- brain sorts through various kinds of internal and external sensory input to create a meaningful experience of the world. Faced with a barrage of disconnected inputs during REM sleep, the higher mental centers attempt to impose order on the incoming messages, creating whatever narrative structure dreams have. This is the “synthesis” stage of the theory. Many dreams are just masses of incoherent images representing incoming groups of signals that the brain was simply not able to synthesize.

For anyone who has been exasperated by the convolutions of Freudian or other schools of dream interpretation, the activation-synthesis theory has a certain iconoclastic appeal because it dismisses dreams as just so much nonsense. How- ever, because almost everyone has had at least a few truly insightful dreams, the theory is ultimately unsatisfying. Also, on a purely physiological level, it is an incomplete theory because it does not offer an explanation for the dreams that occur during non-REM sleep.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

LUCID DREAMING

“In waking, the dream gains imperceptibly on the subject and engenders a forgetting, or rather a memory, whose contour is transferred to a plane of the conscious that cannot accept it. But if it reaches an appropriate plane of the conscious, where it and the soul enter into symbiosis, it becomes an element of creations in the process of personal life.”
MARIA ZAMBRANO

The technique of “lucid dreaming”
Broadly speaking, this type of dream permits the dreamer to consciously participate. That is, realize suddenly that they are dreaming and that they can use the elements of the oneiric scene to their advantage or whim. In this aspect, lucid dreams have a greater potential for creativity; it is the ideal occasion to invent, conceive, and formulate without any type of limit or restriction. The main course of these dreams are the curative properties they offer. The life of any individual can be improved by sleeping, since making direct contact with unconscious material makes it easier to discover oneself and progress interiorly.

But what is a lucid dream? You may have experienced it before. You are sleeping and your mind enters into a dream in which a stranger, for example, yells at you to go home. The inverosimile of the situation makes you suddenly say to yourself: “This is a dream.”

Lucid dreams are very stimulating, above all because they allow the dreamer to control their reactions within the oneiric episode, even if it is a nightmare.

Experts define this phenomenon as “prelucid oneiric activity.” But this situation can manifest in a much more evident form. In this case, you not only know you are dreaming, but you can also use your conscious to change the dream as you wish. In the example given, you could ask the stranger who he is, or why he is throwing you out of your own house.

It must be said, however, that oneiric lucidity is not common, even though surveys have reported that 70 percent of people claim to have had this type of dream at some point. It is possible that many are confusing lucid images with prelucid ones, in which they only had the vague sensation of dreaming.

Keeping the conscious awake for a long time as you navigate your oneiric oceans is complicated. When one has lucid dreams, normally you either wake up shortly after, or quickly fall back into an unconscious state. Lucidity is only intermittent. And once you’ve had a dream of this type, it could be years before you experience another one. This exceptional character is why many people consider lucid dreams to be the most stimulating, above all because they allow the dreamer to control their reactions within the oneiric episode, even if it is a nightmare.

Unfortunately, not much is yet known about this type of oneiric process, although it is believed to occur more frequently in the early morning hours, since this time period makes it easier for the individual to realize that the mind is conceiving something improbable or outright impossible (for example, seeing yourself lift an airplane with one hand).

Are lucid dreams beneficial? Of course, since the individual who experiences them, upon realizing their mind is conscious, has the satisfaction of the sensation of freedom increasing as their self-control does. In this sense, some experts go beyond and claim that when one has learned to control oneiric events, it is much easier to solve daily problems and face anxiety. Lucid dreams, therefore, can contribute to our spiritual growth.

In another way, their potential can help us to treat the most terrifying nightmares. Lucidity allows you to face the threatening images in order to understand them, not obliterate them. According to some psychologists, such as the reputable American analyst Gayle Delaney, the best way to deal with a nightmare is not to turn it into a pleasant dream. Quite the contrary, those who dream lucidly have a better option: directly ask the oneiric characters that so terrorizes them what it is they want, or what they represent.

This experience can not only help transform the evil figures into friendly characters, but also allows one to discern what parts of the dreamer’s personality are represented by the original threatening images. With proper training, the individual will report feeling more secure and confident upon waking.

How it all began
The term “lucid dream” was coined by Frederik Van Eeden in 1898, using the word “lucid” in the sense of “mental clarity.” So we can say that a lucid dream is one in which “the dreamer becomes conscious that they are dreaming.” This definition, given by the researcher Celia Green in 1968, is the most widely accepted today. In any case, the

study of this type of dream has been ongoing since Ancient Greece. In the fourth century BC, Aristotle makes the first written reference to a lucid dream in his Treatise on Dreams: “When one is sleeping, there is something in the conscious that reveals that what is present is nothing more than a dream.”

In 415 AD, Saint Augustine used the story of a lucid dream to justify life after death. Later on, in the seventh century, Tibetan Buddhism studies the yoga of dreams, in which the monks train themselves in lucid dreaming as part of their spiritual development. Despite these precedents, the study of lucid dreams, as we understand them today, does not emerge until the nineteenth century, by the hand of Marquis d’Hervey Saint Denys. This researcher published the book Los suenos y como controlarlos (Dreams and how to control them), in 1867. In this, he demonstrated that it is possible to learn to dream consciously. This fact converted him into the founder of the first line of study on lucid dreams, although his discoveries were put into doubt by many researchers afterward.

In lucid dreams we are conscious that we are dreaming.

The sensation that time has passed, in a normal dream, is due to the sudden change of setting. In a lucid dream, however, the critical sense of the dreamer makes them question passing of time they did not live. Much more systematic and objective than Saint Denys, was the English psychologist Mary-Arnold Forster (1861–1951). In her book, Studies in Dreams (1921), she describes techniques of lucidity and control over dreams she herself experienced. The researcher was especially interested in “learning to fly” in lucid dreams, a practice which she had done since childhood.

Another very important aspect of her work was her nightmare therapy. She learned to recognize that her terrifying dreams were “just dreams.” So she helped many children overcome their nightmares through lucid dreaming, teaching them techniques to change an unpleasant dream to a pleasant one. The fact that she criticized many Freudian theories, especially those about pretending and censorship, relegated her brilliance to obscurity. It wasn’t until many years later that the true value of her discoveries was recognized.

Meditation is a good resource to stimulate lucidity in dreams.
Through the techniques of lucid dreaming, we can overcome nightmares by transforming them into pleasant and agreeable dreams.

The lucid dream, today
Modern research on lucidity has advanced a lot in the last fifty years and has come to dismiss old theories. Traditionally, it was thought that dreams happen in a moment, although long stories occurred within them. However, after studying in a lab the subjective experience of the dreamer, in all cases the estimated time of the lucid dream was very close to the real time (LaBerge, 1980–1985). The sensation that more time has passed is due to the sudden changes of scenery during dreams. In 1982, a study by psychologist Stephen LaBerge and William Dement demonstrated that, in the lucid dream, respiration was controlled voluntarily. They confirmed it with three lucid dreamers, who could breathe rapidly or hold their breath during the experiment without suffering any alteration of the dream.

On the other side, one of the most common themes of lucid dreams is sexual activity. LaBerge, Greenleaf, and Kedzierski (1983) completed a pilot experiment on the physiological response in lucid dreams of a sexual nature. The experimental protocol required the lucid dreamer to make ocular signals at the following moments: when he entered lucidity, when the sexual activity of the dream began, and when he experienced orgasm. The investigators discovered that the body reacts the same sexually during a lucid dream as it does while awake.

The situations, characters, or objects that are present in dreams but impossible in real life are precisely those that awaken the dreamer’s critical sense and brings them to lucidity. “The Meaning of Life,” Hipgnosis.

Meditation is also a good resource to stimulate lucidity in dreams. Before going to bed, find a quiet place and sit in a straight chair or on the floor with your legs crossed. Close your eyelids until only a faint fringe of light enters your eyes, or close them entirely if it won’t make you sleepy. Then, try to relax for five minutes (as you practice, you can lengthen the sessions). Concentrate in a single stimulus, focusing your attention on a specific spot. When you finish the exercise, go directly to bed, trying not to lose the relaxation you attained. Meditation will help you concentrate as you sleep, allowing you to recognize the incongruencies in your oneiric thoughts. This is the starting point of lucid dreaming.

Another method for inducing this type of dreams consists of proposing to complete some sort of assignment while you sleep. When dreaming, you will try to finish this job, something that will remind you that the activity you are doing (if you do in fact dream about what you proposed to) is nothing more than a dream.

A variation of this technique (also implies taking on a task) consists of leaving a glass of water in the bathroom and eating something very salty before going to bed. If you follow this method, you are likely to be thirsty but, given that your body is reluctant to get up and go to the bathroom, the displacement will end up incorporated in your dream. The coincidence will make you realize you are dreaming.

When in daily life, if a person, feeling, or thought appears repetitively, there is a greater chance you will dream of it. The content of dreams is always influenced by the content of your day. The more often you do a certain task, the more likely it is to appear in dreams. Therefore, if you ask yourself “am I dreaming?” frequently, you will end up asking this question in dreams. The problem comes when the sensation of reality in dreams is so strong that it tricks you. It is necessary to repeat the reality test we show later on.

Dr. Consuelo Barea notes that there are two primary techniques to induce lucid dreaming at night. It has to do with self suggestion and direct entry into dreams without losing consciousness, which comes from Tibetan yoga.

The number of times that stimuli repeat in a dream has a great impact on the content. However, the same happens with the quality of these stimuli. An event that impresses you, that hits you hard, that causes a big impact, is much more susceptible to appearing in your dreams, even if it only happened once. The way in which people talk to you or in which you receive information can be very suggestive and enter directly into your unconscious.

The prospective memory is a variation of this ability. It consists of giving yourself an order, forgetting it, and then completing it when the opportune moment arrives. We see an example of this memory in people who are able to wake up without an alarm at the hour they want. When the order of oneiric lucidity is given intensely and with force, it can directly reach the unconscious. Some people are able to have a lucid dream just by hearing about it for the first time; this seems interesting, but it’s more useful to educate one’s prospective memory, so that one knows how to give the order effectively.

The process of training in lucid dreaming requires a gradual increase in oneiric experience. It is possible to advance suddenly to a much higher level of lucidity and control but, if this happens by chance, without having worked for it, you will not be able to maintain this achievement. Advances remain fixed when you work for lucidity, persisting with the techniques for induction. Then, the accomplishments are incorporated with your normal oneiric repertoire. In this way, you can reach a point where, in non-lucid dreams, you still act spontaneously, following the lessons learned from lucidity. For example, if you train yourself in lucid dreams to confront an oneiric character that terrorizes you, you will end up responding bravely to this person automatically, even if you are not having a lucid dream.

When in daily life, if a person, feeling, or thought appears repetitively, there is a greater chance we will dream of it; this happens because the content of dreams is very influenced by the content of our waking day. “El voyeur” (The voyeur) (Carles Baró, 1996).

This practice will give you the keys to discover all that worries you in waking life and ends up represented in worry dreams and nightmares. Upon practicing with oneiric lucidity, you will learn to reap maximum benefit from this source of inspiration and creativity.

In the box we show the steps to follow to train yourself in lucid dreaming. The information comes from the studies of Dr. Consuelo Barea that appear in her book El Sueño Lúcido, (The Lucid Dream), published by this same editorial.

Practicing lucidity gives us the keys to discovering everything that worries us and stalks us in nightmares.
1. Development of induction techniques. Practice some of the techniques described earlier with the intention of having a lucid dream (for example, self-suggestion). You can practice it during the day, before going to sleep at night, or in the morning before a morning nap.

2. Gradually increase the level of oneiric astonishment.

  • - Level 0. No surprise about oneiric signs. - Level 1. One-time astonishment without seeking an explanation. - Level 2. Astonishment and superficial search for an explanation. - Level 3. Lucidity: “I am dreaming.”

The objective is to reach Level 3 through practice of the prior techniques.

3. Reality test. Once you’ve reached at least Level 1, you must get used to practicing the reality test in a dream. This can be visual, of laws of physics, or temporal. To do so, question for a moment the reality or coherence of that which you are seeing or what is happening, according to your notion of time and space. If you find something strange in the evaluation of one of these factors, it will set off an alarm for you.

4. Prolongation of lucidity. Once you’ve reached lucidity, you must extend the time as much as possible to better obtain more information. The way to do this is by internal dialogue with the people in the oneiric scene, and with the thoughts you have during the dream.

5. Control. When you’ve achieved lucidity for a while and it seems like it will continue, you can begin to practice control:

  • - Space-time orientation
    - Changing your own behavior
    - Changing settings, people, events . . .
6. Entering and exiting a dream. After achieving all of the prior steps, you will encounter oneiric moments that you want to remember.

The Kabbalists associate dreams with the central symbol of their tradition: the Tree of Life. “Tree of Life” (Gustav Klimt, 1909).
... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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