The meaning of Goats in dream | Dream interpretation


Though, according to Artemidorus.

To dream of goats signifies no good, but is worst of all to navigators: yet, according to other authors.

To dream of she-goats is a sign of wealth and plenty.

The Complete Dream Book | Gillian Holloway

These animals grazing in an open space are an augury of good fortune.

The Complete Dream Book | Gillian Holloway

Many trials, but you will face them bravely.

If the animals are White or Black or Piebald, then you must take the colour into consideration, as well. See BLACK, also WHITE, for a Piebald animal; your luck will be very erratic and unreliable.

Mystic Dream Book | Internet Archive - Anonymous


Goat Dreams | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Goats


GOAT

To dream of goats wandering around a farm, is significant of seasonable weather and a fine yield of crops To see them otherwise, denotes cautious dealings and a steady increase of wealth.

If a billy goat butts you, beware that enemies do not get possession of your secrets or business plans.

For a woman to dream of riding a billy goat, denotes that she will be held in disrepute because of her coarse and ill-bred conduct.

If a woman dreams that she drinks goat’s milk, she will marry for money and will not be disappointed. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

BECOMING A SHEPHERD

If he sees himself as a shepherd, tending to goats, allowing them to graze, he will become the leader of his people or a ruler of the community.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

GOAT

When interpreting dreams with goats in them, consider the characteristics that we associate with these animals. We consider them to be sturdy and tenacious. Historically, lambs are sacrificial and when we place blame on an individual we may call him a “scapegoat.” Additionally, in pagan mythology goats are considered to be symbols of sexual vitality. Look at the details of your dream and see if you can connect any of these characteristics to yourself or someone else in your daily life. See Also: Animals... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

INDIVIDUATION

One of Carl Jung s most interesting areas of thought is that of individuation. In a nutshell the word refers to the processes involved in becoming a self-aware human being.

The area of our being we refer to when we say T, ‘me’ or ‘myself’ is our conscious self awareness, our sense of self, which Jung calls the ego.

The autobiography of Helen Keller has helped in understanding what may be the difference be­tween an animal and a human being with self awareness. Helen, made blind and deaf through illness before learning to speak, lived in a dark unconscious world lacking any self awareness until the age of seven, when she was taught the deaf and dumb language. At first her teacher’s fingers touch­ing hers were simply a tactile but meaningless experience. Then, perhaps because she had leamt one word prior to her illness, meaning flooded her darkness. She tells us that ‘noth­ingness was blotted out’. Through language she became a person and developed a sense of self, whereas before there had been nothing.

The journey of individuation is not only that of becoming a person, but also expanding the boundaries of what we can allow ourselves to experience as an ego. As we can see from an observation of our dreams, but mostly from an extensive exploration of their feeling content, our ego is conscious of only a small area of experience.

The fundamental life pro­cesses in one’s being may be barely felt. In many contempo­rary women the reproductive drive is talked about as some­thing which has few connections with their personality. Few people have a living, feeling contact with their early child­hood, in fact many people doubt that such can exist. Because of these factors the ego can be said to exist as an encapsulated small area of consciousness, surrounded by huge areas of ex­perience it is unaware of.

In a different degree, there exists in each of us a drive towards the growth of our personal awareness, towards greater power, greater inclusion of the areas of our being which remain unconscious.

A paradox exists here, because the urge is towards integration, yet individuation is also the process of a greater self differentiation. This is a spontaneous process, just as is the growth of a tree from a seed (the tree in dreams often represents this process of self becoming), but our personal responsibility for our process of growth is neces­sary at a certain point, to make conscious what is uncon­scious.

Because dreams are constantly expressing aspects of indi­viduation it is wonh knowing the main areas of the process. Without sticking rigidly to Jungian concepts—which see indi­viduation as occurring from mid-life onwards in a few individuals—aspects of some of the main stages are as fol­lows. Early babyhood—the emergence of self consciousness through the deeply biological, sensual and gestural levels of experience, all deeply felt; the felt responses to emerging from a non-changing world in the womb to the need to reach out for food and make other needs known. Learning how to deal with a changing environment, and otherness in terms of rela­tionship.

Childhood—learning the basics of motor, verbal and social skills, the very basics of physical and emotional indepen­dence. One faces here the finding of strength to escape the domination of mother—difficult, because one is dependent upon the parent in a very real way—and develop in the psyche a satisfying sexual connection. In dream imagery this means, for the male, an easy sexual relationship with female dream figures, and a means of dealing with male figures in competition (father); see sex in dreams.

The dream of the mystic beautiful woman precedes this, a female figure one blends with in an idealistic sense, but who is never sexual.

The conflict with father—really the internal struggle with one’s image of father as more potent than self—when re­solved becomes an acceptance of the power of one’s own manhood. Women face a slightly different situation.

The woman’s first deeply sensual and sexual love object—in a bonded parent-child relationship—was her mother. So be­neath any love she may develop for a man lies the love for a woman. Whereas a man, in sexual love which takes him deeply into his psyche, may realise he is making love to his mother, a woman in the same situation may find her father or her mother as the love object. In the unconscious motivations which lead one to choose a mate, a man is influenced by the relationship he developed with his mother, a woman is influ­enced by both mother and father in her choice. Example: ‘I went across the road to where my mother’s sister lived. I wanted to cuddle her and touch her bare breasts, but we never seemed to manage this. There were always interruptions or blocks.’ (Sid L).

At these deep levels of fantasy and desire, one has to recog­nise that the first sexual experience is—hopefully—at the mother’s breast. This can be transformed into later fantasies/ dreams/desires of penis in the mouth, or penis in the vagina, or penis as breast, mouth as vagina.

For most of us, however, growth towards maturity does not present itself in such primi­tively sexual ways, simply because we are largely unconscious of such factors. In general we face the task of building a self image out of the influences, rich or traumatic, of our experi­ence. We leam to stand, as well as we may, amidst the welter of impressions, ideas, influences and urges, which constitute our life and body. What we inherit, what we experience, and what we do with these creates who we are.

One of the major themes of individuation is the journey from attachment and dependence towards independence and involved detachment. This is an overall theme we mature in all our life. In its widest sense, it pertains to the fact that the origins of our consciousness lie in a non-differentiated state of being in which no sense of T exists. Out of this womb condi­tion we gradually develop an ego and personal choice. In fact we may swing to an extreme of egotism and materialistic feel­ings of independence from others and nature.

The observable beginnings of this move to independence are seen as our at­tempt to become independent of mother and father. But de­pendence has many faces: we may have a dependent relation­ship with husband or wife; we may depend upon our work or social status for our self confidence; our youth and good looks may be the things we depend upon for our sense of who we are, our self image. With the approach of middle and old age we will then face a crisis in which an independence from these factors is necessary for our psychological equilibnum.

The Hindu practice of becoming a sanyassin, leaving behind family, name, social standing, possessions, is one way of meeting the need for inner independence from these in order to meet old age and death in a positive manner. Most people face it in a quieter, less demonstrative way. Indeed, death might be thought of as the greatest challenge to our identifica­tion with body, family, worldly status and the external world as a means to identity. We leave this world naked except for the quality of our own being.

Meeting oneself, and self responsibility, are further themes of individuation.

The fact that our waking self is a small spot­light of awareness amidst a huge ocean of unconscious life processes creates a situation of tension, certainly a threshold or ‘iron curtain’, between the known and unknown.

If one imagines the spotlighted area of self as a place one is standing in, then individuation is the process of extending the bound­ary of awareness, or even turning the spotlight occasionally into the surrounding gloom. In this way one places together impressions of what the light had revealed of the landscape in which we stand, clues to how we got to be where we are, and how we relate to these. But one may remain, or choose to remain, largely unconscious of self.

The iron curtain may be defended with our desire not to know what really motivates us, what past hurts and angers we hide. It may be easier for us to live with an exterior God or authority than to recognise the ultimate need for self responsibility and self cultivation.

To hide from this, humanity has developed innumerable escape routes—extenonsed religious practice, making scapegoats of other minority groups or individuals, rigid belief in a political system or philosophy, search for samadhi or God as a final solution, suicide. This aspect of our matunng process shows itself as a paradox (common to maturity) of becoming more sceptical, and yet finding a deeper sense of self in its connec­tions with the cosmos. We lose God and the beliefs of humanity’s childhood, yet realise we are the God we searched for. This meeting with self, in all its deep feeling of connec­tion, its uncertainty, its vulnerable power, is not without pain and joy. Example: ‘On the railway platform milled hundreds of people, all men I think. They were all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I knew I was among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there was a guard watching us. He was cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap was a red star. He carried a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realised they were all me. Each one had my face. I was looking at myself. Then I felt fear and terror’ (Anon).

The last of the great themes of individuation is summed up in William Blake’s words ‘1 must Create a System, or be en- slav’d by another Man’s; I will not Reason and Compare: my business is to Create.’ A function observable in dreams is that of scanning our massive life experience (even a child’s life experience has millions of bits of information) to see what it says of life and survival. Out of this we unconsciously create a working philosophy of what life means to us.

It is made up not only of what we have experienced and learnt in the gen­eral sense, but also from the hidden information in the cul­tural riches we have inherited from literature, music, art, the­atre and architecture.

The word hidden” is used because the unconscious ‘reads’ the symbolised information in these sources. It is, after all, the master of imagery in dreams. But unless we expand the boundaries of our awareness we may not know this inner philosopher.

If we do get to know it through dreams, we will be amazed by the beauty of its in­sight into everyday human life.

In connection with this there is an urge to be, and perhaps to procreate oneself in the world. Sometimes this is experi­enced as a sense of frustration—that there is more of us than we have been able to express, or to make real. While physical procreation can be seen as a physical survival urge, this drive to create in other spheres may be an urge to survive death as an identity. Dreams frequently present the idea that our sur­vival of death only comes about from what we have given of ourself to others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

WOLF

The male wolf is universally accepted as an image of Man, with reckless aggression and problems in sexual restraint. Considered a cunning, malicious predator, the concept of the wolf implies greed and hunger and, in that sense, physical urges and dissatisfaction. See Greed.

The wolf often symbolizes the shadow of male sexuality. Be glad to have had such a strong dream. You are powerful; you do not need to kill the wolf, hut you can dance with him.

In Steppenwolfy by Herman Hesse, the wolf becomes a symbol for the lonely seeker (and sufferer). Here it is not so much a reference to the meanness of the wolf, but rather the lonely search for the meaning of life.

In Christianity, the wolf is compared to the false prophet and heretic.

According to Jung, the wolf is wilder than the Lion and the Dog. Between 1910 and 1914, Sigmund Freud treated a patient who later would become famous as the “Wolfman.” As a small child this patient suffered from terrifying dreams about wolves, which was the reason why Freud gave him this name.

The earliest memories this man had about his nightmares involved six or seven White wolves that were sitting in a hazelnut tree in front of his window, and he was sure they had come to devour him. Freud here makes reference to two fairy tales: “Little Red Riding Hood” and “The Wolf and the Seven Little Goats.” In addition, Freud sees the wolf as a father substitute. As a young boy, the patient had observed his parents having intercourse from behind, and according to Freud, the patient transferred his repressed desire for sexual gratification by his father to a fear of wolves.

The female wolf symbolizes the nurturing power of nature, like Romulus and Remus, who were both nursed by a wolf. This is also the essence of the fairy tale “Little Red Riding Hood,” where the wolf is not only devouring Grandmother but he is Grandmother—the great mother symbol of wild nature.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

ANIMALS

1- When animals appear in a dream they usually represent an aspect of the personality which cannot be properly understood except on an instinctive level.

Animal with a cub
This will represent motherly qualities and therefore the mother.

Baby animals
The dreamer will be dealing with the child-like side of his or her personality, or possibly children known to him.

The hurt young animal
The dreamer may perceive a difficulty in becoming mature or facing life.

Eating the animal
The dream could be about the ‘demons’ one creates which can only be overcome by assimilating them in a constructive way. Pagan belief thought that one took up certain aspects of the animal that were superior in certain respects to ordinary’ human attitudes.

Godlike, talking awe-inspir- ing or wise animals, or those with human characteristics

Animals have not vet become conscious of, or pitted themselves against, the power from which they came so the wisdom they show is innocent and simple.

It is always important to pay attention to this aspect of animal life in fairy tales and dreams, since we need to be in touch with that part of ourselves.

Helpful animals
The subconscious is producing helpful images from its depths.

The figures of animals arc an easy way for the dreamer to accept that help.

Killing the animal may destroy the energy derived from the instincts. Taming or harnessing the animal shows the efforts made to control the dreamer’s instincts and, if possible, make them productive and useful.

To dream of trying to find some refuge from animals whether by building defences - or perhaps by running away - is indicative of the dreamer’s struggle with his animal instincts, and whether the action being taken is adequate. Such instincts may be threatening or damaging to aspects of the dreamer’s life.

2- When we need some sort of understanding of our own psychological urges, animals will appear which symbolise those qualities. These are:

Bear
The mother (see Family) appears in dreams in many forms, the bear being one of them.

The image may be of the possessive, devouring mother or of the all- caring mother.

If it is recognised in the dream that the bear is masculine the image may then be of an overbearing person, or possibly the father.

Bull
Usually the bull in a dream denotes the negative side of behaviour, such as dcstructivcness, fear or anger (for example a bull in a china shop). However, more positively, the bull is recognised as sexual passion or creative power.

Slaying the bull
Indicates initiation into the world of the mature adult who succeeds in mastering his instincts and can also represent the sign of Taurus in the Zodiac.

Cat
To dream of cats is to link with the feline, sensuous side in human beings, usually in women. Goddesses such as Bast the Egyptian cat goddess arc usually represented as having two sides to their natures, one devious and one helpful, so the cat often denotes the capricious side of the feminine.

The elegant but also the powerful, yet overly self-sufficient aspect of woman, may also be perceived as the cat. Chameleon The dreamer is recognising either in himself or others the ability to adapt and to change according to surrounding circumstances.

Cold-blooded animals or reptiles
The unfeeling, inhuman aspect of the instincts is often portrayed by reptiles and other cold-blooded animals. They are usually recognised as being destructive and alien.

Composite animals
To dream of composite animals could indicate some confusion in sorting out what qualities are needed.

The various qualities of the different animals of which they are made up need to be assimilated and integrated. There are two potentials of development in one figure.

Half-animal, half-man
The dreamer’s animal instincts arc beginning to be recognised and humanised.

Cow
The eternal feminine, especially the mother (see Family) or mother figure (see Archetypes) is often depictcd by the cow. This is partly because it provides milk and nourishment.

Deer/Reindeer
The deer and the reindeer herd have a strict hierarchical structure.

The dreamer recognises his place in the world.

The deer symbolises pride/nobility

Deformed animals
The dreamer realises that some of his impulses are offensive, or revolting.

Dog
Also see individual entry

The dreamer may recognise a faithful and constant companion, a protector or more negatively, somebody the dreamer can’t shake off and who might make trouble.

A dog that the dreamer owned or knew at some period of his life There may be memories asso- ciated with that period of his life, which hold clues to present behaviour.

A huntress with dogs The dreamer is making a connection with one of the feminine archetypes, that of the Amazon (see Archetypes).

A dog guarding gates, being near a cemetery In dreams this indicates the guardian of the threshold, and creatures which must be put to sleep or tamed before there can be an initiation into the underworld Domesticated (tame) animals When we dream of domesticated animals we arc aware of those parts of ourselves with which we have come to terms. There are passions which arc being used in a controlled way although there is the suggestion that those passions were never very formidable. Elephant To see an elephant in a dream is to recognise the qualities of patience, long memory, strength and fidelitv. In the more esoteric sense it signifies radiant and glowing wisdom.

Fox
A fox in a dream tells of hypocrisy, cunning and slyness.

Frog
A period or act of transformation (a frog transforms from a tadpole and moves on to the land). There is something repugnant which is turning into something of value (i.e. a frog into a prince). Also see Snake as all reptiles have the same significance.

Goat
To dream of a goat is to recognise creative energy and masculine vitality. It may also represent the dark side of human nature, promiscuousness and sexuality.

To be riding a goat is to be trying to come to terms with the dreamer’s relationship with the dark side of his nature.

The goat may also represent the Devil or Satan.

It is also the symbol for Capricorn.

Hare
The hare highlights intuition, spiritual insight and intuitive ‘leaps’. Intuition may be debased into madness by fear or ignorance. Because of its association with the moon, the hare can, in its negative aspect, signify the Priestess/Witch aspect of femininity or the Priest/Sorcerer of the masculine (see Archetypes). In its positive imagery however it is the radiant hare (often holding its baby in a cave) and thus the Mother of God.

Hedgehog
The hedgehog can represent evil and bad manners, or literallv our inability to handle a ‘prickly’ situation.

Horse
The horse in a dream represents the energy at the dreamer’s disposal.

A white horse depicts the spiritual awareness of the dreamer; a brown one the more pragmatic and down-to-earth side, while a black horse is the passionate side of the dreamer’s nature.

A pale horse is taken to indicate death, and a winged horse depicts the soul’s ability to transcend the earthly- plane.

If the horse is under strain or dying there is a severe weakening of the dynamic power that carries the dreamer forward. Ibo much pressure may be being experienced in our lives.

If the horse is being harnessed to a cart the dreamer may be concentrating too hard on thoroughly- utilitarian objectives.

In a man’s dream, a mare will denote the Anima, a woman; or the realm of the feminine (see Archetypes).

In a woman’s dream, being kicked by a horse may indicate the Animus or her relationship with a man.

A horse that can get through any door and batter down all obstacles is the collective Shadow (see Introduction) those aspects of the personality which most people attempt to suppress.

The horse as a beast of burden is often the Great Mother (See Introduction). or mother archetype (see Archetypes). In modern dreams the car has largely taken over from the horse as a symbol with many of the same associations (see Car and Journey Sections).

Hyena
The hyena is generally taken in dreams to signify impurity, instability and deviousness.

Jackal
The jackal is associated with the graveyard, and therefore with Death. As a scavenger it is also a cleanser. Esoterically, it is the servant of the transformer, guiding souls from the earth plane into the light.

Jaguar
The jaguar’s main qualities are its speed and balance. It stands for the balance of power between the dark and light forces. Kangaroo This somewhat exotic animal often stands for motherhood. and also strength. Lamb The lamb is the innocent side of man’s nature.

It is said that evil cannot withstand such innocence.

Leopard
The leopard represents cruelty and aggression, and traditionally the deviousness of wrongly used power. Lion The lion stands for majesty, strength and courage. It can also represent the ego and the passions associated with it.

If the dreamer is struggling with the lion there should be a succcssful development as long as the dreamer is not overpowered, or the lion killed.

A man-eating lion shows that an aspect of the personality- has slipped out of alignment, putting both the dreamer and his surroundings at risk.

A lion lying with a lamb There is a union, or compatibility of oppositcs; instinct and spirit going hand in hand. Lizard also see Reptiles The lizard appearing in a dream represents instinctive action or ‘one-track’ thinking.

Lynx
The main quality associated with the lynx is its keen eyesight, thus in a dream it can often portray objectivity. Monkey The monkey characterises the infantile, childish and arrested side of the dreamer’s character.

The qualities of mischief, impudence and inquisi- tiveness all belong to the monkey. While these are often seen as regressive tendencies, that of lively- curiosity maintains a necessary lightness of spirit.

Mare
see Horse

Mole
The mole is often taken to represent the powers of darkness, but can often signify the blind persistence and determination which enables the dreamer to succeed. Monster/Dragon also see Dragon in D Section A fear which is beyond understanding, usually welling up from within rather than from the outside world, is often represented in dreams by monsters and dragons.

The devouring monster The dream may deal with a recognition that ultimately we arc all absorbed back into a greater whole.

If the dreamer gets the better of the monster he will have mastery over his own fear of death, and may be able to harness this forcc for his own use. Cutting out the monster’s heart or other vital organ, or lighting a fire inside it, depicts the struggle against the dark forces of the underworld.

Mouse
Also see Vermin

The mouse’s quality of timidity can often be addressed in the dreamer, if it is recognised that this can arise from turbulence and lack of understanding.

Otter
The otter is uniquely equipped to exist within its chosen element of water and to be able to gain subsistence from its environment, all things the dreamer may- need to develop.

Ox
The ox depicts the ability to be patient, and to make sacrifices for others.

Parts of animals
(the limbs, eyes, mouth, etc.)

These have the same significance as parts of the human body (see Body).

If the four legs are particularly emphasised possibly in contrast with a three-legged animal the whole rounded personality with all four functions of the mind fully developed is being highlighted. Pig or Wild Boar The pig is taken in Western belief to indicate ignorance, stupidity, selfishness, and gluttony.

The dreamer’s better self may be beginning to recognise these unattractive qualities in himself. Without such recognition there can be no transformation or mastcry of them. Pigs and jewels There is a conflict between the lower urges and spiritual values. Perhaps there is a failure to appreciate spiritual values. Big litters of piglets can represent fruitful- ness, although sometimes without result, since the sow can depict the Destructive Mother (see Archetypes). Wild Boar The wild boar depicts the archetypal masculine principal, and therefore the negative Animus in a woman’s dream.

(See Introduction).

The dreamer may be evading an issue that should be challenged and dealt with more daringly.

Prehistoric animals
A trauma from the past, or from childhood, may be causing difficulty. Rabbit Rabbits appearing in a dream can mean one of two things.

The obvious connection with fertility could be important or it could be that the trickster aspect of the personality could be coming to the fore (see Hare).

A white rabbit may show the dreamer the way to the inner spiritual world and, as such, act as a guide.

Ram
The ram is a svmbol of masculine virility and power, and by association has those qualities of the sign of Aries in the Zodiac.

Rat
also see Vermin ‘flic rat signifies the diseased and devious part of the dreamer or of his situation. It can also represent something which is repulsive in some way.

The dreamer may be experiencing disloyalty from a friend or colleague.

Reptiles
To dream of reptiles indicates that we are looking at the more frightening lower aspects of the personality. We may have no control over these, and could therefore be easily devoured by them. We are afraid of Death or the death process, but must go through a process of change in order to be reborn.

Seal
Dreaming of a seal suggests that we are at one with the clement in which we live.

Serpent
Also see Snake

The serpent is a universal symbol which can be male or female or it can be self-created. It can signify death or destruction or conversely life and also rejuvenation.

It is the instinctive nature and is also potential energy. When the power of the instinctive nature is understood and harnessed, the dreamer comes to terms with his or her own sexuality and sensuality and is able to make use of the higher and more spiritual energies which become available. In a man’s dream a snake may appear if he has not understood the feminine or intuitive part of himself, or when he doubts his own masculinitv. In a woman’s dream the snake may manifest if she is afraid of sex, or sometimes of her own ability to seduce others. Because of its connection with the Garden of Eden, the serpent is the symbol of duplicity and trickery; and also of temptation. Sheep The sheep is renowned for its flock instinct, and it is this interpretation which is most usually accepted in dreams.

The helplessness of the sheep when off balance is also another aspect which is recognisable, as is the apparent lack of intelligence.

The god-fearing, ‘good sheep’ and also the passive and ‘sheepish’ may have relevance within the context of the dream.

To dream of sheep and wolves or of sheep and goats is to register the conflict between good and evil.

Sinister Animals Any threat from animals indicates the fears and doubts the dreamer has over his ability to cope with the stirrings of the unconscious. Snake - also see Serpent. Snake dreams occur like serpent dreams - when the dreamer is attempting to come to terms with his or her more instinctive self.

Inevitably, this has to do with the recognition and harnessing of energies which have been suppressed and thwarted. Since the most primeval urge is sexuality, the image of the snake is the most primitive one available.

A snake twined around the body or limb

This indicates some form of bondage, possibly being enslaved to the passions.

A snake, or worm, leaving a corpse by its mouth

This can sometimes represent the sexual act (the little death), but can also signify the dreamer’s control of his or her libido.

A snake in the grass This image denotes disloyalty, trickerv and evil. With its tail in its mouth This image is one of the oldest available to man and signifies completion and the union of the spiritual and physical (see Shapes, Circle). Being swallowed by a snake This shows the need and ability to return to the ultimate, and lose our sense of space and time (see Eating). Because snakes are such a low form of life, while also being in some cases poisonous, they have become associated with death, and all that man fears. Snake twined around a staff or similar (see Caduceiis) The unconscious forces that are released once the dreamer reconciles the opposing sides of himself create healing, rebirth and renewal, and this is universally represented as two snakes entwined round a central staff.

It is a symbolic representation of the basic form of DXA, the ‘building blocks’ of life.

The colours of the snake may give additional insight into the meaning of the dream (see Colours). Squirrel The squirrel represents the hoarding aspcct of our personalities.

Tiger
The tiger signifies royalty, dignity and power and is both a creator and a dcstrover

Toad
To dream of toads is lo connect with whatever the dreamer may consider ugly in life, or in his behaviour. However, implicit in that ugliness is the power of transformation and growth into something beautiful.

For a toad and an eagle to appear is to note the difference between earthly and spiritual values.

Transformation of animals In dreams, the metamorphosis of the dreamer or other people into animals and vice versa shows the potential for change within any situation.

Unicorn
The unicorn is a symbol of purity and traditionally could only be owned and perceived by virgins.

It is a return to, and a resurgence of, an innocence necessary in self-understanding, and it often suggests the control of the ego and selfishness.

Vermin
In dreams vermin may represent the enforced contemplation of something that is unnecessary or that has invaded one’s spacc.

Vertebrates
Animals with backbones often give an understanding of the qualities associated with that animal.

The smaller and lower orders of animal signify the unconscious, the higher orders the emotions.

Whale
The whale, because it is a mammal which lives within water, indicates the power of resurrection and rebirth man’s abilitv to come back from the dead.

Weasel
The weasel traditionally highlights the devious, more criminally oriented side of ourselves.

Werewolf
see Sinister Animals

Wild animals
Usually wild animals stand for danger, dangerous passions, or dangerous people. There is a destructive force arising from the unconscious, threatening the safety of the individual. Such a dream may be a way of understanding anxiety.

Domesticating wild animals The dreamer may- have come to terms with his or her wilder side.

Wolf
Dreaming of wolves may- indicate that we are being threatened by others, whether singly or by the pack.

The dreamer may- have cruel sadistic fantasies without taking responsibility for them.

The She-wolf The hussy; but also the carer for orphans and rejected young.

Wounded animals
The dreamer may be suffering either emotional or spiritual wounds.

Zebra
This animal has the same significance as the horse, but with the additional meaning of balancing the negative and the positive in a very dynamic way.

3- By understanding animals and their symbolism we approach life in a more simplistic and natural way.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

GOAT

To dream of goats is a sign of prosperity. But if you get butted by a goat, you will suffer a loss.

To be milking a goat means several small setbacks but final triumph.... Gypsy Dream Dictionary

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Gypsy Dream Dictionary

SHE-GOAT

To dream you see or have many she-goats, sheep, cows, and horses, signifies wealth and plenty.... The Complete Dream Book

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The Complete Dream Book

WETHERS

To dream you see or have many wethers, sheep, she-goats, etc. , signifies health and plenty.... The Complete Dream Book

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The Complete Dream Book

GOAT

Symbol: The goat stands for being alert and listening attentively. Vision: Watching goats at play: try not to be too boisterous or foolish. Watching goats being milked: modesty will serve you well in a coming situation. Listening to goats: it does not matter how hard you try—someone will always find something to complain about.

Depth Psychology: The female goat is a symbol of patience, modesty, amiability, and the ability to resolve challenging situations without difficulty.

The goat—as the sacrificial lamb—is also a sign of the sacrifices you have made in your life. Which description—modesty or martyrdom—fits your present situation?

See Billy Goat. ... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

GOAT

Dreams of a goat reflect that something is eating at you or that someone’s got your goat. You are letting things make you feel bad. This dream is giving you the message to take responsibility for the situation you are in and to stop blaming or making anyone your scapegoat. Alternatively, this dream might signify that you are climbing upward toward status and recognition. You are butting your way through the obstacles to your success with machismo. In the Hebrew traditions it is believed that he who dreams about goats shall be blessed throughout all their years. See Capricorn.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

SHEEP

The sheep is renowned for its flock instinct and it is this interpretation that is most usually accepted in dreams.

The helplessness of the sheep when off balance is also another aspect that is recognizable, as is the apparent lack of intelligence.

The god-fearing, ‘good sheep’ and also the passive and ‘sheepish’ may have relevance within the context of the dream.

To dream of sheep and wolves or of sheep and goats is to register the conflict between good and evil.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

GOAT

A dream concerning goats is a warning against involving yourself in any venture or activity which is not strictly cm the up and up; the warning is especially strong if the dream featured milking a goat.

If you were chased, frightened, or butted by a goat, the message pertains specifically to gambling— don’t!... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

GOBLITL

(see also Gnome, Spirits)

(1) In folklore, goblins are mischievous, destructive spirits. In dreams, they should be understood as unconscious forces; emotions or instinctive drives that have been repressed and are either rebelling against their neglect or forcing you - the conscious ego - to take notice of them. Listen to their story (of when and why they were repressed), consider their demands, and allocate them a useful role in your life.

(2) The troll / goblin in the story of the Three Billy Goats Gruff guards a bridge leading to a lush meadow and threatens whoever tries to cross. The goblin figure in your dream may symbolize whatever is preventing you from being happy, or fulfilling yourself. See also Bridge.

GOD(DESS)... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

TROLL

Like the troll in the Billy Goats Gruff story, it may symbolize whatever is preventing you from making the transition to a new phase of personal development (the rich pastures in the story).... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

FAIRY TALES AND SYMBOLISM

The symbolism in fairy tales speaks to adults as well as children, and deals with childlessness, sexual maturation, remarriage, jealousy across the generations, sibling rivalry, incest, murderous rage, inheritance issues and other timeless problems.

If you find yourself transported to the scene of a well-known fairy tale, the following tips may help with the interpretation. First of all, consider what common fairy tale motif your dream scene is depicting. For example, it could be:

Courtship tale
A strong theme in many fairy tales is the idea that love and goodness triumph. In the animal bridegroom tale, the girl protagonist marries some kind of beast, who is transformed by love in the course of the story into a (usually handsome) prince. In your waking life, do you feel you deserve the reward of love and security for your efforts? Do you believe love can conquer all? Or is your dream urging you to reconcile your masculine and feminine attitudes in waking life?

Good and bad choice
Most fairy tales involve a moment when the protagonist is faced with a choice. These include: helpless people or creatures to be kind or beastly to; opportunities to tell the truth or lie, or cheat or be honest; a choice to stand up for your principles or betray the innocent and submit to tyranny.

If someone’s inside and outside are at odds, typically by the end of the tale the two are reconciled (as in the Beast’s transformation in ‘Beauty and the Beast’). Notice the elemental justice of this fairy tale motif and see whether you can relate any of its themes to your waking life.

Magical gift
A mirror that allows one to see one’s heart’s desire (or one’s loved ones); a table that sets itself with food and dishes; a stick that beats one’s enemies; a goose that lays golden eggs; a pouch that replenishes itself with gold. Consider the symbolism of these motifs. To what gift or hidden quality is your dream referring?

Magical Helper
These would include: an old crone, a talking frog, a fairy godmother, a swan to convey one across a river, a bird that carries one in his claws. Also, and not always in a helping role, one might encounter magical creatures such as witches, ogres, fairies, mermaids, unicorns, trolls, gnomes and dragons. Consider the symbolism of any helpers, or non-helpers, that appear in your dream; they represent psychological energy or strength that you either possess or need to find. What qualities do they represent, and how will they help or hinder you?

The ‘Rule of Three’
Many fairy tales, as well as many dreams, seem to obey what might be called the ‘rule of three’. They may contain three characters (’Goldilocks and the Three Bears’, ‘The Three Little Pigs’, The Three Billy Goats Gruff); three wishes; three tasks that a prince (or princess) must do to win his (or her) true love; three times for a request or saying to be repeated (I’ll huff, and I’ll puff…’).

If you find yourself in a story in which three is significant, see NUMBERS.

Trial or test to win one’s love
Going ‘east of the sun and west of the moon’ and bringing back a treasure; learning the answer to a riddle; spinning straw into gold (and guessing Rumpelstiltskin’s name); breaking through the 100- year-old forest to find the sleeping princess. Can you relate such tests to your waking life? What trials and tribulations do you need to overcome?

Remember that these stories have been told and retold for centuries because they have resonated with their hearers and expressed something important to their audiences. So if scenes from a specific fairy tale appear in your dream, consider the symbolism of the fairy tale motif, and see how the story and the lessons it teaches apply to your waking life.

If a specific character appears in your dream out of context from his, her or its fairy tale, for example Cinderella wandering the streets of New York on her own, Sleeping Beauty buying a house or Puss in Boots accompanying you on a train journey, consider what aspect of yourself or your life the character represents. So if you find yourself having lunch with Rapunzel in your dreams, think about the symbolism of her hair, which was cut off to punish the girl for her indiscretion. Is there something you feel guilty about in waking life or should feel guilty about? Or do you feel imprisoned in an ivory tower and long for freedom of expression?

Finally, don’t forget that, above all, fairy tales encourage you to believe in possibilities and the hidden ‘magic’ that can be discovered in the most unexpected places.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

DO ANIMALS DREAM?

It seems that they do, although we can’t know for sure. All we can measure is whether or not they have REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, which is more or less associated with dreams. All mammals have REM sleep, and that increases the likelihood that they do dream.

Because REM sleep is recognizable in mammals and birds, but not in snakes and other reptiles, scientists think that most warm- blooded animals dream. Studies have monitored the sleep of goats, sheep, cats, dogs, rats, mice, monkeys and apes, and all had dream periods and symptoms; all except the spiny anteater, which seems to be a dream-free mammal.

Watch a sleeping dog or cat sometime, and you can tell if it is dreaming of running after something. Its eyes twitch, sometimes it moves its paws—something could be happening in its dreams.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia



















































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