The meaning of Hamlet in dream | Dream interpretation


See Village.

The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams | Stearn Robinson - Tom Corbett

To dream of a small village or Hamlet indicates a removal to a crowded city.

Mystic Dream Book | Internet Archive - Anonymous


Hamlet | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Hamlet


SKULL

A reminder of Death and the meaning of life. This symbol often points to a feeling of spiritual emptiness. On the other hand, it also addresses the shape, structure, and essence of spirituality and, in that sense, of life itself.

(See the skull of Yorick in Hamlet.)... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

HERBS

Many herbs have symbolic meanings that go back centuries. For example, the ancient Romans offered wreaths of bay leaves as a symbol of triumph and peace. Earlier, bay was a sacred plant for Greeks and considered to be a protector from disease, witchcraft and lightning. In Britain, rosemary was called ‘Rose of Mary’ in memory of the Virgin Mary; in Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Ophelia says, ‘There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance, pray you love, remember.’ This is by no means a complete list of the symbolic meanings of each herb in your dreams. Bear in mind that the symbolism of herbs is inextricably tied to culture and religion; your personal associations also need to be taken into account.

Aloe: Healing, protection, grief, bitterness, affection .

Angelica: İnspiration, magic.

Basil: Sweetness, kindness, deep affection.

Bay: Glory, honor, reward.

Calendula: Joy, remembrance, grief.

Chamomile: Energy in adversity, patience, long life, wisdom .

Chives: Usefulness.

Dandelion: Faithfulness, happiness.

Dill: Preservation, good spirits.

Dock leaves: Used to soothe the irritation caused by nettles, so in dreams they suggest how you should approach a difficult situation in waking life.

Fennel: Strength, worthy of praise, flattery.

Garlic: Protection, strength, healing.

Lavender: Housewifely virtue, acknowledgment.

Lily of the Valley: Contentment, return of happiness, let’s make up .

Marjoram: Joy, happiness.

Mint: Eternal refreshment, wisdom, virtue.

Mugwort: Tranquility, happiness.

Mustard: Faith, indifference.

Parsley: Useful knowledge, feast, joy, victory.

Rosemary: Remembrance, love, loyalty, fidelity.

Saffron: Beware of success; all is not what it seems.

Sage: Wisdom, self-esteem.

Sassafras: Foundation, considered choices.

Thyme: Activity, bravery, courage, strength.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

SPICE / CONDIMENT / HERB

To dream of spices or herbs suggests you need more variety in your life. You need to look at a situation or relationship from a different perspective. To dream of growing herbs suggests self-advancement through hard work but the dream may also refer to your health. Many herbs have symbolic meanings that go back centuries and, as a result, most individual herbs have specific symbolic meaning in dream lore (see box on page 270).

For example, the ancient Romans offered wreaths of bay leaves as a symbol of triumph and peace, and they also used to strew rose petals, a symbol of both love and victory, on the paths of wedding parties and victors of war. In Britain, rosemary was called ‘Rose of Mary’ in memory of the Virgin Mary, and in Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Ophelia says, ‘There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance, pray you love, remember.’ In accordance with this association of rosemary with remembrance, the herb was once placed on the graves of loved ones. To see sage in your dream constitutes rejuvenating elements in your life, but it could also signal the need to be ‘sage’, or wise, when taking a decision that is preoccupying your waking mind. Majoram is thought to absolve and purify, rue reflects the bitterness of loss, whilst thyme is seen to represent ‘love forsaken’.

If garlic features in your dream, this refers to your personal defenses against negative aspects or forces in your life. The dream may, in addition, have referred to garlic’s medicinal properties and the need to take better care of your health in waking life.

To dream that you are eating gravy suggests that something in your life will happen more easily than you expected. Alternatively, it may suggest health problems and business disappointments. To dream of vinegar indicates worrisome and negative matters in real life; it may indicate that are the object of jealousy.

If ketchup features in your dream, this suggests that you need to spice something up in waking life. To see mustard in your dream signifies a desire to improve your prospects in life. On the other hand, it could denote some hasty action for which you are suffering and now bitterly regret. Or are you hoping to ‘cut the mustard’ and satisfy your own expectations in a forthcoming challenge in real life? Mustard seeds will most often indicate a new idea and your desire to plant, tend and realize its harvest.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

GHOST OF SOMEONE WHO HAS DIED

Some believe that the ghosts in their dreams are real representations of the dead. This is an unlikely explanation of such dreams. More likely, to dream of the ghost of someone who is departed represents a part of you that is unclear and that you do not understand. Ghosts can also be all that you have left of loved ones who are no longer alive, so they can offer you comfort by appearing in your dreams, representing a welcome opportunity to speak once again to that special person and to come to terms with the fact that they are gone. To dream of the ghost of someone who has died might also represent something that you wanted that is no longer in your reach. This dream is telling you to move on. Another explanation is that your unconscious was pointing out an uncomfortable truth that your conscious mind is working hard to repress, just as the ghost of his father appeared to Shakespeare’s Hamlet to tell him something that he may already have known—that his father was murdered by Hamlet’s new stepfather.

To dream of touching a ghost and having it disappear indicates that you are trying to confront and come to terms with painful memories. Demonic ghost images with no face or dark shadows (’dementors’, if you are a Harry Potter fan) may represent your negative tendencies, unpleasant parts of personality or your ’shadow’. Old superstition-based dream interpretations say that dreaming of friendly ghosts is a lucky omen, and that you should be receiving unexpected good luck. On the other hand, if you were very frightened by the ghost in your dream, then others will try to impose their will on you and you must be vigilant in order to stand up to it.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

A SHORT HISTORY OF DREAMING

Dreams, it seems, have fascinated the entire human race from earliest times. And until quite recently, most cultures have set great store by dreams. For example, in ancient Egypt the high priests used dreams for prophecies. There still exists a papyrus book of dreams dating back approximately 3,500 years in which dream symbols are interpreted, proving that the Egyptians took their dreams seriously.

In ancient Greece, people believed that dreams were a direct contact with the gods. One of the principal uses of dreams was for healing. Sick people went to special temples that were dedicated to dreaming as a curative method. There, a physician would help to induce a dream, which the physician would then interpret as a guide to the treatment of the ailment, and its cause as well. In modern times, the father of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, drew upon the writings of Artemidorus, a Greek who lived in the second century B.C.E. whom Freud much admired. Artemidorus’s books have been preserved for over two thousand years and were in constant use as references before the scientific revolution put dreams into the category of “unimportant nonsense.”

At the time of the Italian Renaissance, when rational thinking was beginning to come to the fore, dreams began to be dismissed as trivial by-products of sleep. William Shakespeare denounced dreams as “the children of an idle brain.” (On the other hand, he wrote eloquently on the nature of dreams in his play Hamlet!) John Dryden, an English philosopher, dismissed dreams as the result of indigestion or infection. The bias against dreams continued through the nineteenth century, when most people thought that dreams were caused by some external stimulus—such as a knock on the door making a person dream the house was being burglarized. Aside from such shallow interpretation, most ordinary people, doctors and philosophers, church fathers and professors, believed that dreams had no meaning and saw no need to heed them.

In his autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Dr. Jung tells of a dream in which he was a guest at a garden party. Another guest was a woman from the town of Basel, a good friend of both Jung and his sister. In the dream, Jung says, he instinctively knew the woman from Basel would die. However, when he woke up he had no idea who the woman was in real life, though the dream was exceptionally vivid. He writes, “A few weeks later, I received news that a friend of mine had a fatal accident. I knew at once that she was the person I had seen in the dream but had been unable to identify.”

It took the work of Sigmund Freud to open people’s eyes once more to the possibility of dreams being important and useful. Though Freud was obsessed with sexual meanings in dreams to the exclusion of all else, he performed a useful service with the publication of his book on dream interpretation. However, his narrow view held that dreams were mere “wish fulfillment” and a substitute for sexual satisfaction. Fortunately, one of his student colleagues, Carl Gustav Jung of Switzerland, disagreed with Freud and formulated a more comprehensive theory of dream analysis.

Jung researched the previously unstudied territory of the unconscious and came up with the idea of a collective unconscious, through which all people were connected by a common store of knowledge and experience that often revealed itself in dreams.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

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