intervention

The meaning of Intervention in dream | Dream interpretation


To dream of being involved in an intervention for someone, foretells that you will be appreciated by others for your good deeds. This dream is also common when the dreamer is worried about someone from their waking life.

If you dream of people having an intervention for you, this means you may need to end an unhealthy relationship or situation in your life.

My Dream Interpretation | myjellybean


Dreaming Of An Intervention | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Intervention


EXECUTION

To dream of seeing an execution, signifies that you will suffer some misfortune from the carelessness of others.

To dream that you are about to be executed, and some miraculous intervention occurs, denotes that you will overthrow enemies and succeed in gaining wealth. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

FINGERS

To dream of seeing your fingers soiled or scratched, with the blood exuding, denotes much trouble and suffering. You will despair of making your way through life.

To see beautiful hands, with white fingers, denotes that your love will be requited and that you will become renowned for your benevolence.

To dream that your fingers are cut clean off, you will lose wealth and a legacy by the intervention of enemies. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

GAOL

If you dream of being confined in a gaol, you will be prevented from carrying forward some profitable work by the intervention of envious people; but if you escape from the gaol, you will enjoy a season of favorable business. See Jail. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

MIRE

To dream of going through mire, indicates that your dearest wishes and plans will receive a temporary check by the intervention of unusual changes in your surroundings. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

MEDICINE

Necessary intervention for physical or mental pain or neglect, i.E. Undesirable, but beneficial chastisement; see “pill”... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

MILKY WAY

Viewing the milky way is searching for divine intervention... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

PLUG

Used to constrict and prevent intervention... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

ROSARY

Revealing a need for spiritual intervention... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

MIRACLE

One needs a miracle or religious intervention to get through a very difficult situation. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

TRIPLETS

1. Great joy, a surprise is in the offing after a great period of suffering.

2. A feeling that obstacles can be overcome, usu­ally in business affairs.

3. Destiny or divine intervention is at hand. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

ROAD

Symbolic of a person’s journey in life or a choice.

If the road is bumpy and hard it can symbolize a rough period in life.

If the road is smooth it symbolizes God’s intervention on your behalf, Lk.3:5 ... Christian Dream Symbols

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Christian Dream Symbols

FORK (UTENSIL)

To dream of being stabbed with a fork or seeing someone stabbed with one is a warning to guard your statements in order not to lose status and prestige.

If you see someone eating with a fork it denotes that the dreamer may be cleared of all his present worries through the intervention of a friend.... Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

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Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

HALLUCINATIONS, HALLUCINOGENS

Example: ‘1 dream insects are dropping either on me from the ceiling of our bedroom, or crawling over my pillow. My long-suffering husband is always woken when I sit bolt upright in bed, my eyes wide open and my arm pointing at the ceiling. I try to brush them off. I can still see them—spiders or woodlice. I am now well aware it is a dream. But no matter how hard I stare the insects are there in perfect detail. I am not frightened, but wish it would go away’ (Sue D). Sue’s dream only became a hallucination when she opened her eyes and continued to see the insects in per­fect clarity.

A hallucination can be experienced through any of the senses singly, or all of them together. So one might have a hallucinatory smell or sound.

To understand hallucinations, which are quite common without any use of drugs such as alcohol, LSD or cannabis, one must remember that everyone has the natural ability to produce such images. One of the definitions of a dream according to Freud is its hallucinatory quality. While asleep we can create full sensory, vocal, motor and emotional expenence in our dream. While dreaming we usually accept what we experience as real.

A hallucination is an experience of the function which produces dreams’ occur­ring while we have our eyes open.

The voices heard, people seen, smells smelt, although appearing to be outside us, are no more exterior than the things and images of our dreams. With this information one can understand that much classed as psychic phenomena and religious experience is an encoun­ter with the dream process. That does not, of course, deny its imponance.

There are probably many reasons why Sue should experi­ence a hallucination and her husband not. One might be that powerful drives and emotions might be pushing for attention in her life. Some of the primary drives are the reproductive drive, urge towards independence, pressure to meet uncon­scious emotions and past trauma and fears, any of which, in order to achieve their ends, can produce hallucinations.

A hallucination is therefore not an ‘illusion’ but a means of giving information from deeper levels of self. Given such names as mediumship or mystical insight, in some cultures or individuals the ability to hallucinate is often rewarded so­cially.

Drugs such as LSD, cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, pey- ote and opium can produce hallucinations. This is sometimes because they allow the dream process to break through into consciousness with less intervention.

If this occurs without warning it can be very disturbing.

The very real dangers are that unconscious content, which in ordinary dreaming breaks through a threshold in a regu­lated way, emerges with little regulation. Fears, paranoid feel­ings, past traumas, can emerge into the consciousness of an individual who has no skill in handling such dangerous forces. Because the propensity of the unconscious is to create images, an area of emotion might emerge in an image such as the devil. Such images, and the power they contain, not being integrated in a proper therapeutic setting, may haunt the indi­vidual, perhaps for years. Even at a much milder level, ele­ments of the unconscious will emerge and disrupt the person’s ability to appraise reality and make judgments. Un­acknowledged fears may lead the drug user to rationalise their reasons for avoiding social activity or the world of work. See ESP and dreams; dead lover in husband under family. See also out of body experience.... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

RESCUE

Intervention in our life by someone else’s action or emotions; something which changes the situation one is in, or changes mood. Rescuing someone else, or animal: the effort we make, or what we have put into dealing with a relationship difficulty or an internal feeling state. Also can relate to one’s desire to do something admirable or noble, such as saving souls, helping someone in distress, and thus having power in life. Rescuing someone of opposite sex: breaking the bonds of emotion, sexuality or dependence which tie us to parents or others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

ACCIDENT

1- Dreams of being injured, murdered or killed occur relatively frequently, and attention needs to be paid to the specific circumstances of the dream. We are usually receiving a warning to be careful or to be aware of hidden aggression, either our own or others.

2- Such dreams may highlight anxieties to do with safety or carelessness, or fear of taking responsibility.

3- Since there is no such thing as an accident in spiritual terms, it signifies Divine intervention, or interference from an authoritative source.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

REFEREE

A referee as a character in your dreams may point to some problem that needs mediation. He may ask you to follow the rules of the game in any of your social interactions. His appearance may be a response to your own intervention in the arguments of others.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

FRAILTY

Vision: Dreaming about being frail expresses your feeling of hopelessness or not measuring up to someone’s expectations. Maybe you have a “weakness” for someone and that person is taking advantage of it? Or do you lack assertiveness? Frequent dreams of this nature are a sign of deep-seated anxieties that might need therapeutic intervention.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

FORK (UTENSIL)

to dream of being stabbed with a fork or seeing someone stabbed with one is a warning to guard your statements in order not to lose status and prestige.

If you see someone eating with a fork it denotes that the dreamer may be cleared of all his present worries through the intervention of a friend.... Encyclopedia of Dreams

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Encyclopedia of Dreams

FRUIT

As with Colours, the meaning of Fruit in your dream varies according to the kind. Almonds or Nuts show difficulties, but not so great that they cannot be overcome. Apples are tokens of success and good health. Apricots or Peaches are very favourable signs especially in love affairs and friendships. Cherries or Plums show disappointment in domestic affairs, small family quarrels and difficulties.

Currants indicate happiness in married life, a faithful and devoted partner. See Grapes. Elderberries or Wild Fruits indicate difficulties. You may not secure great prosperity, but you will find yourself comfortably placed in business and in home affairs.

Figs are generally considered a foreign fruit, though they are sometimes grown in England. Expect small legacies or unexpected news.

Filberts: See Almonds.

Gooseberries are similar to Currants, and concern your domestic affairs.

Grapes indicate success in business, as well as happiness in your home life. See Currants.

Lemons are an omen of family discord or of disappointment in love. See Oranges.

Melons show a successful intervention on your part in some trouble among your friends.

Mulberries or Raspberries or Strawberries are favourable for love affairs and domestic happiness.

Nuts: See Almonds.

Oranges indicate business difficulties. See also Lemons. Peaches: See Apricots.

Plums: See Cherries. Raspberries: See Mulberries,

Strawberries: See Mulberries,

Walnuts See Almonds.

Wild Fruit: See Elderberries. ... Mystic Dream Book

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Mystic Dream Book

ABOVE

Dreams of something being above you signify an expanded point of view, higher awareness, and your connection to your angelic guides, and spirit allies. Just as in real life, when you can remove yourself from a problem or challenge, the solutions become clear.

If you are above looking down, you are seeing your life circumstances from a vantage point of wisdom.

If you are looking above from the ground level, you are seeking divine guidance and intervention. See Prayer.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

HELP

If you are reaching out for help, assistance, intervention, support, SOS or 911, then you are connecting with the benevolence of the universe, and accessing a source that is greater than you. Alternatively, your dream is showing you the perils of remaining associated with a feeling of powerlessness and victimhood. Perhaps it is time for you to lift yourself up by your bootstraps and access your inner hero. See Emergency and Victim.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

HOLY

You are connecting to your divine nature, and the whole of humanity. You may feels as though you are receiving divine intervention and feeling whole in your soul. See Halo, Aura, God and Prophetic Dreams.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

ACCIDENT

From a spiritual perspective there is no such thing as an accident, so in dreams such an occurrence signifies divine intervention, or interference from an authoritative source.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

CLIMATE

Material aspects: As the world is seen to undergo climate change through human intervention, dreams can take on a more apocalyptic feel. We seem to be less in touch with the effect we have on the world we live in.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

DROWN

An unfortunate omen pertaining to business interests, unless you (or the drowning person) was revived or rescued, in which case you will get a chance to recoup your losses through the intervention of a friend.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

DENTIST

The image of the dentist is associated with the idea of achievement with suffering. You feel the need for a third party to help you and save a difficult situation, although you know that this intervention will be painful.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

OPERATION

If you dream that you are about to undergo a surgery, and suddenly, you get up from the operating table, convinced that you are cured, it means you have self confidence. You believe in the resolution of a problem that at first seemed incurable. So, you will find the correct answer without outside intervention. In addition to this, the image of the scalpel urges you to act with precision, decisiveness, and conviction to put an end to a situation that is worrying you.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

ANGEL

Angels are major archetypal energies that were here before us. Over many thousands of years, humankind has formulated these huge energetic sensations into specific beings that appear in many religious and spiritual disciplines. These beings can appear in dreams and are evidence of a highly evolved moment in your spiritual development. Angels are also symbolic of divine intervention in process, where miraculous turns of events can occur through being guarded from a high level.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

DITCH

A ditch is a culvert in the earth that has been deliberately created by human intervention. With the ground being a symbol for consciousness, anything that is just below the surface of the ground is that which is just below the surface of our awareness. Most ditches are built to hide in or divert the movement of something. In this way, a ditch is the result of doing a little self- investigation in order to provide for something to be able to move without detection or other implemented strategy. What is just below the surface of your thinking in your life right now?... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

VOODOO

Voodoo is a fairly misunderstood religion that is pagan in nature and is often thought of as being connected to evil intentions.

The common perspective about voodoo is that the practitioners of it have the power to control and manipulate human experience through magical interventions. To dream of this may connect to fears of things of a mystical nature and an expression of the shadowy side of the mysteries of life.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

HERO / HEROINE

The hero(ine) is a universal archetype, a symbol, among other things, for the self, even our ideal self. Our creativity and our sense of initiative. Dreaming about being rescued by a hero(ine) is more complex. It could represent either the intervention by our own higher self or a feeling of weakness, helplessness, incompetence, and, as a consequence, a need to be rescued.... Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

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Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

ACCIDENTS, ACTION AND ADVENTURES

When you dream that you are the Lara Croft and Indiana Jones of your own adventures, it can be action packed and thrilling; but when you dream that you are in a car or plane crash, the dream can feel rather different.

The traditional interpretation of dreams involving accidents of any kind is that we are receiving some kind of warning to be on our guard against possible danger or hidden aggression, either our own or others’. From a psychologist’s point of view, such dreams may highlight anxieties to do with safety or fear of taking responsibility. Spiritual interpretations of such dreams suggest the need for some kind of intervention from an authoritative source.

According to Freud, accidents in dreams, like slips of the tongue in waking life, are not accidents but dream events with a meaning that can help us to unravel the often incomprehensible maneuvers of our unconscious mind. For Jung, accident dreams, as well as offering insights into our unconscious thought processes, can provide a reaction to a traumatic experience or the fear of it. For example, if you were in a car accident or are anxious about having one, you may dream of being involved in one. People who suffered great trauma, such as rape victims or war veterans, may have nightmares that are exactly like, or very similar to, actual life events.

The most commonly accepted theory is that accident dreams show how your unconscious has noticed things that you may not have noticed in waking life. They are both a reminder and a possible warning. You may, for example, dream of a teenager being knocked down on a busy street outside a petrol station, only to read a few weeks later that a teenager has been seriously injured in just this way. The most likely explanation is that you have unconsciously noticed how dangerous the crossing was, having read somewhere about the growing number of teenagers killed on the roads due to the use of mobile telephones, and without realizing it, you have observed that an accident was highly likely. These kinds of subtle clues and subliminal suggestions are around us every day.

Adventure dreams can be a reflection of your waking life, which may have become more adventurous recently, but it could also suggest the need to experiment, physically, emotionally and spiritually.

The Jungian archetype of the hero, starting out on his adventure and battling adversity in order to learn, mature and grow, dominates the interpretation of adventure-themed dreams. Adventure dreams urge the dreamer to take on new challenges or seek out aspects of themselves or talents that remain hidden in waking life. They point the way towards a new understanding, and the discovery of inner strength and creativity that can empower the dreamer.

Finally, activities or actions within dreams are often concerned with hidden motivations and agendas, and, interpreted within the context of your mood and emotions within the dream, are particularly important. The psychological meaning is that action needs to transfer from dreams to waking life in order for progress to be made. Symbolically the action can give an indication of the dreamer’s spiritual progress.

Typically, activities in dreams are associated with moving forward or making progress in waking life. They reflect how well you are doing in your quest to achieve your ambitions. Do you need to move on? Take another route? Speed up or slow down? That’s why it is particularly helpful to take note of the details in your dream. What was the goal you were running, walking, climbing or swimming towards? Did you feel exhausted or were you in peak form? Were you competing against anyone? Did you reach your destination or achieve your goal? Did you feel satisfied or disappointed? The answers to these questions will help you assess your progress and identify any obstacles or attitudes that may be holding you back.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

JUDGE

[DREAM IMAGES: ARBITRATOR; CRITIC; EXAMINER; MEDIATOR]

One need not be an attorney, judge, or critic by profession to identify with this archetype; it can appear in your dreams if you are, or need to be, a natural mediator or are involved in interventions between people. It can also appear if your unconscious requires you to learn justice and compassion. The shadow judge manifests as consistently destructive criticism, judging without compassion or with a hidden agenda. Legal manipulation, misuse of legal authority, and threatening others through an association with the law are other expressions of the shadow.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

WHAT ARE DREAMS FOR?

“Trust in dreams, for in them the gateway to eternity is hidden.”
KHALIL GIBRAN

Dreams and their purpose
Consider dreams like home movies that each person produces in response to their daily experiences. These movies are meant to clarify certain situations and support the person. With sufficient knowledge, they can become a sort of spiritual guide, since oneiric thoughts are a window to the subconscious where, frequently, hidden feelings and repressed needs are stored without us realizing.

Even then, there are people who question the importance of dreams. Some scientists, for example, believe that the content of dreams is simply a random mix of the many electronic signals the brain receives. Others, however, find all types of messages in even the simplest dreams, and end up distancing themselves from daily reality in favor of oneiric activity.

Neither extreme is advisable. Each dream is undoubtedly a journey into the unknown, but, at the same time, modern psychology has allowed us to understand a good part of their structure. One of the conclusions drawn from the study of dreams confirms this: dreams can be a priceless aid to the imagination, but above all when it comes to solving problems. You just have to know how to listen to them, because their content tends to have a direct relation to the emotional challenges you are experiencing.

Each dream is a journey to the unknown with an implicit personal message. Although it is the content of the episode that determines our emotional state, dreaming in black and white indicates a possible lack of enthusiasm or nostalgia for the past. These dreams are an invitation to live with more intensity and enjoy the present.

Still from the film Viaje a la Luna (Méliès, 1902).

It is known that in times of crisis, our oneiric production increases significantly, both in quantity and intensity. Should we consider this “surplus” to be positive? Yes, as long as one makes an effort to remember and interpret the dreams, since, as we will see further on, they have a valuable therapeutic potential.

For example, if a couple is going through a critical phase, remembering and analyzing usually helps them understand the subconscious reactions they have to the situation. In other words, dreams are an excellent tool to get to the bottom of emotional conflicts. Knowing the causes is an essential step to resolving the problems, regardless of what course you take.

The English psychologist David Fontana, whose books have been translated into more than twenty languages, said it clearly: “In listening to my patients’ dreams in therapy sessions, I have observed how, often, these can take us right to the root of the psychologic problem much quicker than other methods.” Although, we shouldn’t fool ourselves: dreams are a mystery that can rarely decipher everything. But if a certain level of interpretation helps us understand ourselves better, what more can we ask for? From a practical point of view, our own oneiric material can be very useful.

In dreams, relationships with others are a recurring theme. The people that appear in our dreams, especially strangers, represent facets of ourselves that the subconscious is showing us.

Well-known writers such as Robert Louis Stevenson, William Blake, Edgar Allan Poe, and Woody Allen have had faith in this, acknowledging that part of their works have been inspired by dreams. The discoveries of Albert Einstein or Niels Bohr (father of modern atomic physics), among other celebrated scientists, had the same origin. In any case, these examples shouldn’t confuse us: no dream can tell you what path to follow through symbolic images without the intellect to decipher them.

Prosperity, precognition, and pronostics
What’s more, judging by some documented cases, we can even reap material gain from dreams. There is proof of some people that had premonitory dreams managing to earn significant sums of money thanks to their oneiric “magic.” The most spectacular case was in the fifties, when an Englishman named Harold Horwood won a considerable number of prizes betting on horses. His dreams transmitted clues as to the winning racehorse to bet on. Unfortunately, these types of premonitions don’t come to everyone. However, anyone has the opportunity to discover the greatest treasure of all—knowledge of one’s self—through their dreams.

We’ve all experienced the feeling of having lost control of our lives at some point. We might feel like others are deciding things for us or that we are victims of our circumstances.

Our “dream-scapes” contain valuable information about our desires and concerns; they could also function as a forecast of some aspect of our future. According to ancient tradition, dreaming of stars predicts prosperity and spiritual wealth. “Starry Night” (Van Gogh, 1889).

However, many psychologists disagree with this. That is, they argue that daily events are not coincidences but rather meaningful deeds that reflect the inner state of the individual.

Dreams and thoughts
According to these experts, luck is a pipe dream, something that does not exist, since that which we consider the result of coincidence is none other than the natural manifestation of our thoughts and attitudes. We are basically creator, not passive receivers or victims of the events that unravel in our lives.

An example that illustrates this idea perfectly is the story of the old man who threw rocks into the sea. One day, someone asked if he ever got bored of the simple game. The old pebble thrower stared at his questioner and gave an answer he’d never forget: “My small stones are more important than they seem, they provoke repercussions. They will help create waves that, sooner or later, will reach other other side of the ocean.”

What does this have to do with dreams? It’s simple: as we’ve just seen, we are the only ones responsible for our daily experiences, no matter how hard that is to believe. Therefore it shouldn’t be too difficult to take control of our lives; we just have to listen to the messages in our interior, that is, our oneiric thoughts, of which we are ultimately the authors.

Visualizations
In this way, thanks to dreams, our two existences—conscious and unconscious—can work together to make our lives more creative and free. An important part of this process is getting to know and understanding better the process of thought. One of the most beautiful and commonly used visualizations in yoga reminds us of this: “In the bottom of the lake of our thoughts is a jewel. In order for it to shine in the light of the sun (the divine), the water (the thoughts) must be pure and crystal clear and calm, free of waves (excitement). If our water is murky or choppy, others can’t see this jewel, our inner light...”

In the bottom of the lake of our thoughts is a jewel...

But it’s not that simple: it’s often difficult to discern the connection that unites wakefulness with sleep, between what we think ourselves to be and what our oneiric fantasies say about us. In any case, if our search is passionate and patient, constant and conscious, it will result in the discovery of our true Self. Therefore the interpretation of dreams cuts right to the heart of the message conceived by and for ourselves (although not consciously). It is important to learn to listen to them (further on we will discuss techniques for this) when it comes time to unstitch their meaning and extract the teachings that can enrich our lives.

The rooms in our dreams reflect unknown aspects of our personality.

In this way, when we have to make an important decision, we can clear up any doubts through a clear understanding of our most intimate desires. Although it may seem like common sense, this is not that common these days, since most people make decisions at random, out of habit, or by impulse.

The meaning and psychic effect of some deities in Tibetan Buddhism can be linked to the monsters that are so popular today.

Dreams allow creativity a free rein and free us from worry, sometimes resulting in surreal images that would be impossible in waking life.

Put simply, the idea is to find your true identity and recognize your wounds, fears, and joys through dreams. Never forget that the subconscious, although hidden, is an essential part of our personality. Dreams are fundamental for understanding the Self, since they are a direct path to this little-known part of ourselves. Their symbolic content allows us to recover repressed emotions and gives us a map to the relationships that surround us.

Nightmares that put us to the test
Sometimes the messages they bring us are not so pleasant and take the form of nightmares. However, although it may be hard to accept, these nightmares are valuable warnings that some aspects of our life are not

in harmony with our deepest Self and thus need our prompt intervention. Nightmares are proof that self discovery is not always pleasant. Sometimes it’s necessary to feel this pain in order to find out what you really are and need.

On the other hand, dreams give creativity a free rein because, when we sleep, we are free from our day-to-day worries. Therefore, even if you don’t consider yourself a creative person, keep in mind that all the scenes, symbols, and characters that appear in your dreams have been created solely and exclusively by you.

It’s often very helpful to record dreams in a notebook (we will explain how further on) in order to later analyze them and apply their teachings to daily life.

It is quite the paradox; the human being awakens their most intimate reality precisely when they are sleeping.

Carl Gustav Jung, who dedicated his life to studying dreams, developed this metaphor: “People live in mansions of which they only know the basements.” Only when our conscience is sleeping do we manage to unveil some of the rooms of our magnificent house: rooms that may be dusty and inhospitable and fill us with terror and anxiety, or magnificent rooms where we want to stay forever.

Given that they all belong to us, it is reasonable to want to discover them all. Dreams, in this sense, are a fundamental tool.

How to remember dreams
At this point, you’re probably thinking, “Sure, dreams are really important, but I can’t use them because I simply don’t remember them.” That’s not a problem, there are techniques you can use to strengthen your memory of oneiric thoughts. Techniques that, when applied correctly, allow us to remember dreams surprisingly well.

The use of these methods is indispensable in most cases since people tend to forget dreams completely when they wake up. Why? Because, according to the hypothesis of Sigmund Freud, we have a sort of internal censor that tries to prevent our oneiric activity from becoming conscious material.

Sometimes the message of dreams turns unpleasant and takes the form of a nightmare...

However, we can laugh in the face of this censor with a few tricks. The most drastic is to wake up suddenly when the deepest sleep phase (REM phase) is just about to end, so that you can rapidly write all the details of your mind’s theater in your notebook. Waking suddenly will take this censor by surprise, stopping it from doing its job. The best time to set the alarm is for four, five, six, or a little more than seven hours after going to sleep.

If your level of motivation is not high enough to get up in the middle of the night and record your dreams, there are alternatives that let you sleep for a stretch and then remember what you dream with great precision.

First of all, it’s helpful to develop some habits before going to bed, such as waiting a few hours between dinner and going to sleep. Experts recommend avoiding foods that cause gas (legumes like green beans, raw vegetables, etc.) and foods high in fat.

You must also keep in mind that, like tea and coffee, tobacco and alcohol alter the sleep cycle and deprive the body of a deep sleep (the damaging effects of a few glasses on the body does not disappear for about four hours).

What is recommended is to drink water or juice, or eat a yogurt, more than two hours after eating, before going to bed. There are two main reasons for this: liquids facilitate a certain purification of the body, and because, most interestingly for our purposes, it causes us to get up in the middle of the night. As we said, this will catch the internal censor by surprise and allow us to record our dreams easily.

Relaxing in bed and going over the events of the day helps free the mind and foster oneiric creativity.

Yoga exercises, such as the savasana pose, are great for relaxation, restful sleep, and a positive outlook.

Relaxation
It’s important to surround yourself with an environment that stimulates oneiric activity. You should feel comfortable in your room and your bed. The fewer clothes you wear to sleep, the better. Practicing relaxation techniques, listening to calming music, or taking a warm bath a few minutes before getting into bed will help relieve stress so that you enjoy a deep restorative sleep.

There are good books on relaxation on the market, both autogenous and yogic; we recommend one of the most practical, Relajacion para gente muy ocupada (Relaxation for Busy People), by Shia Green, published by this same publishing house. However, the real key is to concentrate on remembering dreams. When you go to bed, go over the events of the day that were important to you. This way, you will increase the probability of dreaming about the subjects that most interest or worry you.

So, let’s suppose you’re asleep now. What should you do to remember dreams? First, try to wake up naturally, without external stimuli. If this isn’t possible, use the quietest possible alarm without radio. Once awake, stay in bed for a few moments with your eyes closed and try to hold your dreams in your memory as you gently transition into wakefulness. Take advantage of this time to memorize the images you dreamt. The final oneiric period is usually the longest and these instants are when it is most possible to remember dreams.

Remember that it’s best to write the keywords of the dream immediately upon waking. It is convenient to keep a notebook on the nightstand and reconstruct the dream during the day.

The dream notebook
Next, write in the notebook (that you have left beside your bed) whatever your mind has been able to retain, no matter how absurd or trivial your dreams seem, even if you only remember small fragments. This is not the moment to make evaluations or interpretations. The exercise is to simply record everything that crosses your mind with as much detail as possible. Giving the fragility of memory, it’s okay to start off with just a few key words that summarize the content of the dream. These words will help you reconstruct the dream later in the day if you don’t have enough time in the morning. Ideally this notebook will gradually become a diary or schedule that allows you to study, analyze, and compare a series of dreams. Through a series of recorded episodes, you can detect recurring characters, situations, or themes. This is something that’s easy to miss at first glance. One important detail: specialists recommend you date and title each dream, since this helps you remember them in later readings.

It’s also interesting to complement your entries with relevant annotations: what feelings were provoked, which aspects most drew your attention, which colors predominated, etc. An outline or drawing of the most significant images can also help you unravel the meaning. Finally, you should write an initial personal interpretation of the dream. For that, the second part of this book offers some useful guidelines.

While we dream, there is a sort of safety mechanism that inhibits our movement. Therefore, sleepwalkers don’t walk during the REM phase. This protects us from acting out the movements of our dreams and possibly hurting ourselves. Still from the Spanish movie Carne de fieras (Flesh of beasts) (1936).

As we’ve seen, there are a series of techniques to remember dreams. This is the first step to extracting their wisdom. Now, given that oneiric thoughts are a source of inspiration for solving problems, wouldn’t it be great to choose what you dream about before you go to sleep? Rather than waiting for dreams to come to us spontaneously, try to make them focus on the aspects of your life that interest you.

How to determine the theme of dreams
Let’s imagine that someone is not very satisfied with their job. They’d like to get into another line of work but are afraid of losing the job security they enjoy. On one hand, they’re not so young anymore, they should take the risk to get what they really want. But they don’t know what to do. They need a light, a sign, an inspiration. In short, they need a dream. But not just any dream, a dream that really centers on their problem and gives answers.

However, if you limit yourself to just “consulting your pillow,” you won’t get the desired results. There is a possibility you will be lucky and dream about what you’re interested in, but more likely you will dream of anything but. If we are really prepared to dive into that which worries us most intimately, we can direct our dreams to give us concrete answers. Just like the techniques to remember dreams, the process is simple: before sleeping, we must concentrate on the subject of interest.

It’s also best to write in your notebook all the events and emotions of the day that were most important before you go to sleep.

Once your impressions and theme to dream have been noted, concentrate on the subject that most bothers you. Think about it carefully; propose questions and alternatives, “listen” to your own emotions. It’s best if all possible doubts are noted in the dream notebook. This way you’re more likely to receive an answer.

In order for it to be an effective answer, the question must be well defined. The fundamental idea of the problem should be summed up in a single phrase. Once you’ve reflected on the problem, it’s time to go to bed. But the “homework” is not finished yet. Before going to sleep, you need to concentrate on the concrete question. You need to forget everything else, even the details. Just “visualize” and repeat the question, without thinking of anything else, until you fall asleep.

Oneiric thoughts are a source of inspiration. Annotating and analyzing them carefully fosters a process of self discovery.


Writing a dream notebook
You should always have a notebook and pen near your bed to write down dreams the moment you wake up. Don’t forget to always write the date. What details should you include in this kind of diary? As many as you remember, the more the better.

  • Note the events of the dream in order. It may not seem important when they appear unrelated. However, when analyzing them you can establish a chronological relationship between distinct elements.
  • What characters appear in your dreams? Was someone important missing? If one of them reminded you of someone you know, note that. Don’t rely on your memory.
  • If a familiar sight appears, analyze the differences between the dream and the real world. Were the doors/windows in the same place? Were they the same size and color? And so on. This is especially important if you want to practice lucid dreaming.
  • Also note the differences between familiar people in dreams and how
  • Also note the differences between familiar people in dreams and how they are in real life.
  • List the non-human characters that appeared, as well as any objects that behaved as if animated.
  • Take special note of recurrent themes, scenes, or characters. Do they always act/happen the same way?
  • Write down all the colors you remember.
  • Note your emotional reactions: if you feel happy, scared, nervous... Don’t let any theories about the meaning of dreams interfere. You run the risk of skipping details that might be very significant.
  • Finally, don’t trust your memory. After a time, you won’t remember a thing about some of the dreams you wrote down. No matter how clear they are in the moment, write them down.

Dreams are “signs,” messages from our subconscious, and the study and interpretation of them helps resolve the problems that worry us.

Nocturnal sleep puts us in touch with the deepest level of being, which allows us to approach our problems with a wider perspective. And induced dreams tend to be easier to remember than other oneiric activity.

When we dream, we enter a marvelous world that escapes the laws of spatial and temporal logic.... Dreampedia

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