The meaning of Kept in dream

The keywords of this dream: Kept



Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of making candy, denotes profit accruing from industry.

To dream of eating crisp, new candy, implies social pleasures and much love-making among the young and old. Sour candy is a sign of illness or that disgusting annoyances will grow out of confidences too long kept.

To receive a box of bonbons, signifies to a young person that he or she will be the recipient of much adulation. It generally means prosperity.

If you send a box you will make a proposition, but will meet with disappointment. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of being in a beautiful and well-kept cemetery, you will have unexpected news of the recovery of one whom you had mourned as dead, and you will have your title good to lands occupied by usurpers.

To see an old bramble grown and forgotten cemetery, you will live to see all your loved ones leave you, and you will be left to a stranger’s care.

For young people to dream of wandering through the silent avenues of the dead foreshows they will meet with tender and loving responses from friends, but will have to meet sorrows that friends are powerless to avert. Brides dreaming of passing a cemetery on their way to the wedding ceremony, will be bereft of their husbands by fatal accidents occurring on journeys.

For a mother to carry fresh flowers to a cemetery, indicates she may expect the continued good health of her family.

For a young widow to visit a cemetery means she will soon throw aside her weeds for robes of matrimony.

If she feels sad and depressed she will have new cares and regrets. Old people dreaming of a cemetery, shows they will soon make other journeys where they will find perfect rest.

To see little children gathering flowers and chasing butterflies among the graves, denotes prosperous changes and no graves of any of your friends to weep over. Good health will hold high carnival. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of a chandelier, portends that unhoped-for success will make it possible for you to enjoy pleasure and luxury at your caprice.

To see a broken or ill-kept one, denotes that unfortunate speculation will depress your seemingly substantial fortune.

To see the light in one go out, foretells that sickness and distress will cloud a promising future. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of soiled finger-nails, forbodes disgrace in your family by the wild escapades of the young.

To see well-kept nails, indicates scholarly tastes and some literary attainments; also, thrift. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of flight, signifies disgrace and unpleasant news of the absent.

For a young woman to dream of flight, indicates that she has not kept her character above reproach, and her lover will throw her aside.

To see anything fleeing from you, denotes that you will be victorious in any contention. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

If a woman dreams that she has beautiful hair and combs it, she will be careless in her personal affairs, and will lose advancement by neglecting mental application.

For a man to dream that he is thinning his hair, foreshadows that he will become poor by his generosity, and suffer illness through mental worry.

To see your hair turning gray, foretells death and contagion in the family of some relative or some friend.

To see yourself covered with hair, omens indulgence in vices to such an extent as will debar you from the society of refined people.

If a woman, she will resolve herself into a world of her own, claiming the right to act for her own pleasure regardless of moral codes If a man dreams that he has black, curling hair, he will deceive people through his pleasing address. He will very likely deceive the women who trust him.

If a woman’s hair seems black and curly, she will be threatened with seduction.

If you dream of seeing a woman with golden hair, you will prove a fearless lover and be woman’s true friend.

To dream that your sweetheart has red hair, you will be denounced by the woman you love for unfaithfulness. Red hair usually suggests changes If you see brown hair, you will be unfortunate in choosing a career.

If you see well kept and neatly combed hair, your fortune will improve.

To dream you cut your hair close to the scalp, denotes that you will be generous to lavishness towards a friend. Frugality will be the fruits growing out therefrom.

To see the hair growing out soft and luxuriant, signifies happiness and luxury.

For a woman to compare a white hair with a black one, which she takes from her head, foretells that she will be likely to hesitate between two offers of seeming fortune, and unless she uses great care, will choose the one that will afford her loss or distress instead of pleasant fortune.

To see tangled and unkempt hair, life will be a veritable burden, business will fall off, and the marriage yoke will be troublesome to carry.

If a woman is unsuccessful in combing her hair, she will lose a worthy man’s name by needless show of temper and disdain.

For a young woman to dream of women with gray hair, denotes that they will come into her life as rivals in the affection of a male relative, or displace the love of her affianced.

To dream of having your hair cut, denotes serious disappointments.

For a woman to dream that her hair is falling out, and baldness is apparent, she will have to earn her own livelihood, as fortune has passed her by.

For man or woman to dream that they have hair of snowy whiteness, denotes that they will enjoy a pleasing and fortunate journey through life.

For a man to caress the hair of a woman, shows he will enjoy the love and confidence of some worthy woman who will trust him despite the world’s condemnation.

To see flowers in your hair, foretells troubles approaching which, when they come, will give you less fear than when viewed from a distance.

For a woman to dream that her hair turns to white flowers, augurs that troubles of a various nature will confront her, and she does well if she strengthens her soul with patience, and endeavors to bear her trials with fortitude.

To dream that a lock of your hair turns gray and falls out, is a sign of trouble and disappointment in your affairs. Sickness will cast gloom over bright expectations.

To see one’s hair turn perfectly white in one night, and the face seemingly young, foretells sudden calamity and deep grief.

For a young woman to have this dream, signifies that she will lose her lover by a sudden sickness or accident. She will likely come to grief from some indiscretion on her part. She should be careful of her associates. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of an inn, denotes prosperity and pleasures, if the inn is commodious and well furnished.

To be at a dilapidated and ill kept inn, denotes poor success, or mournful tasks, or unhappy journeys.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of walking upon well-kept lawns, denotes occasions for joy and great prosperity.

To join a merry party upon a lawn, denotes many secular amusements, and business engagements will be successfully carried on.

For a young woman to wait upon a green lawn for the coming of a friend or lover, denotes that her most ardent wishes concerning wealth and marriage will be gratified.

If the grass be dead and the lawn marshy, quarrels and separation may be expected.

To see serpents crawling in the grass before you, betrayal and cruel insinuations will fill you with despair. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of walking through a well-kept park, denotes enjoyable leisure.

If you walk with your lover, you will be comfortably and happily married. Ill-kept parks, devoid of green grasses and foliage, is ominous of unexpected reverses. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of a vineyard, denotes favorable speculations and auspicious love-making.

To visit a vineyard which is not well-kept and filled with bad odors, denotes disappointment will overshadow your most sanguine anticipations. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Something or someone kept in wraps to keep others from knowing the truth... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Secure place where sentimental items of importance are kept for display, whether public or private... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

An oath given in a dream is more reliable than one given when awake, but spiritual conditions must be met and kept... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

That which has been kept in a safe state to use at the proper time; research contents... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Emotions kept in check (“buttoned up”).

2. Intimately revealing self to others, sexually or emotionally (opening but­tons).

3. A sense that someone harbors angry feelings (losing buttons). ... New American Dream Dictionary

New American Dream Dictionary

1. If well kept, indicates happiness on the horizon.

2. If in poor condition, troubles ahead.

3. If placing flowers, indecisive. ... New American Dream Dictionary

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Secrets or aspects of self kept hidden for protection.

2. Feelings of guilt or regret (as in to “hide out”). ... New American Dream Dictionary

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Excess emotional “baggage” that weighs down the carrier.

2. Waking dreams and/or desires that are kept out of sight.

3. Travel, freedom or adventure. ... New American Dream Dictionary

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Sense of well-being.

2. Concern for outward appearances.

3. Prosperity (if lawn is well kept). ... New American Dream Dictionary

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Aspect of self, kept or locked away, perhaps even from the dreamer.

2. Fear of emotional risks.

3. Assured happiness (opened lock). ... New American Dream Dictionary

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Recognition of untapped power and ability that is being kept from others.

2. Be careful; someone is being deceptive. ... New American Dream Dictionary

New American Dream Dictionary

1. If well-kept, signifies the ability to maintain order in one’s waking life.

2. If messy, signifies the inability to keep things or­derly in one’s life. ... New American Dream Dictionary

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(Emergence; Manifestation; Visibility) In a dream, if one sees somethingthat is kept away from him as a secret, it means experiencing comfort after suffering from trials, receiving compensation after suffering from injustice, conceiving a child after having given up hope or the like examples.

A revealed secret on time in a dream means fulfillment of a promise, satisfying one’s needs, repayment of one’s debts, arriving of a long awaited person from a journey, release of a prisoner from his jail, and for a woman, it could mean becoming pregnant.

If something emerges at the wrong time in a dream, it means debts.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Islamic Dream Interpretation

Hearing the sound of the trumpet of the Day of Resurrection in a dream means hearing the truth. Blowing in the trumpet of the arc angel Israfll (uwbp) in a dream means salvation of the righteous ones. In a dream, the sound ofthis trumpet invokes fear incurring news that cause shivers and trembling in people’s hearts.

If one hears it alone, then the news are exclusive for him.

If everyone hears its sound in the dream, then it is a public affair.

If one hears the sound of the trumpet and anticipates that everyone has heard it too in a dream, it means plagues and adversities, for the first blow indicates the end of the world and the death of everyone in it.

The second blow indicates their resurrection back to life, which will be followed by the Grand Gathering for the Day of Judgment.

If a sick person hears the first blow in a dream, it means that he will shortly recover from his illness.

If the town is inflicted with a calamity, then hearing it in a dream means that people’s adversities will be lifted.

If there is a drought, it will end and food prices will go back to normal.

If one hears the second blow of the trumpet of resurrection in a dream, it means prosperity, revealing what is hidden, exposing long kept secrets, recovering from an illness, release from prison, reunion of beloveds, or meeting with people who have just arrived from a long journey.

(Also see Blowing; Rising of the dead; Resurrection)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

Islamic Dream Interpretation

In a dream, a turtle represents a woman who likes to adorn herself and to make herself noticeable to please men.

A turtle in a dream is also interpreted as a man of knowledge, or a chiefjustice, because she is most knowledgeable and God fearing amongst the sea creatures. In a dream, a turtle therefor could represent a devout worshipper who reads the scrolls of God’s prophet Abraham, upon whom be peace, or any of the holy scriptures. Seeing a pet turtle in a house or a town in a dream means that the people of knowledge in that locality are well respected. Seeing a turtle living in a dump, then it represents a knowledgeable person living in the midst of ignorant people who care little about learning anything from him. Eating a turtle in a dream means profits, benefits, or money.

If one sees a turtle inside his house, or ifhe owns one in a dream, it means that he will benefit from the company of a learned person who is acquainted with ancient manuscripts, or in interpreting ancient scrolls. Ifone sees a turtle lying on its back in a dream, it means that there is a man of knowledge in that town people donot recognize. Ifone sees a well kept and fed turtle sitting on a brocade in the dream, it means that the people of that town honor their scholars. However, a turtle in a dream also can be interpreted as deception, trickery, spying, hiding, evil and acquisition of weapons.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

The interpretation of this dream depends on its aspect. If, in your dream, you abandoned something of a distasteful nature, you will soon hear favorable financial news. However, if in your dream you abandoned someone close to you, it signifies trouble, but don’t worry, you can overcome it by heeding the warning.

If you dreamed you were a witness to an abandonment of any kind, it indicates you will hear some news which will be important to you.

To dream you have been abandoned is a dream of contrary and mean you will have reconciliation or a quick recovery from trouble. **Abandoned: Difficulty in making a decision. Abandon someone; Difficulty in overcoming a stressful situation. Abandon a child; Poor judgment in a situation causing a loss of material objects and finances.

If you abandon your lover, you will not retrieve lost valuables, and friends divert from your favors.

To abandon your business, indicates a frantic state of affairs in which there will be suspicion. **Abandonment: Rejection for positive or negative results. Not finishing something.

It is important to note what is being abandoned and by whom, as these things or individuals may be leaving the dreamer’s life soon or vice versa for good or bad. **You must consider this dream’s varying aspects in order to interpret it. Your unconscious may be giving you messages regarding what needs to be kept and needs to be let go. Traditional dream interpretations say that if you are the one being abandoned in your dream, it is a dream of the contrary and you may experience reconciliation or recovery from trouble or illness. Please remember that the unconscious is attempting to compensate for an imbalance in the conscious.

For example if you are overly attached to someone in daily life, in the dream state you may be abandoned by him/her. This is an attempt by the unconscious to make you aware of your dependency. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

You must consider this dream’s varying aspects in order to interpret it. Your unconscious may be giving you messages regarding what needs to be kept and needs to be let go. Traditional dream interpretations say that if you are the one being abandoned in your dream, it is a dream of the contrary and you may experience reconciliation or recovery from trouble or illness. Please remember that the unconscious is attempting to compensate for an imbalance in the conscious.

For example if you are overly attached to someone in daily life, in the dream state you may be abandoned by him/her. This is an attempt by the unconscious to make you aware of your dependency.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Dream interpretation is very personal and each dream speaks to you in the most intimate way.

The anchor symbol could have varying meaning depending on what is going on in your life. It may be saying “Stay put!” or “This is a good place to lay down your anchor.” Dreams involving anchors are hints from your unconscious and may suggest a need to reflect and economize. Also, goals set. Stability. Sometimes a desire for a permanent home.

A disappointment, something holding you back. Foundation; security. You have some base; some foundation upon which to build. You are secure, but it should be kept in mind that an anchor can sometimes hold you back when you want to be moving. Disillusionment, something holding you back. Ideals and actions set in concrete. Holding steady. Being anchored to a situation or person. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

To dream of floodlights shows that you want to throw a lot of light on a subject and get everything out in the open where it can be seen and understood.

A floodlight that burns out shows that you will be kept in the dark about certain things, but if you replace the bulb, you will uncover all the secrets.... Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

General: one s own feelings and urges at that level of development—such as possessiveness, joy, curiosity, innocent love, infant trauma; feelings of helplessness; vulnerability, lack of responsibility; being cared for. Also a new phase of life; a new idea; new activity—as when we say someone has a new baby, meaning a new project or business. When with a couple: the marriage—what is created in a relationship; the life process in us, based on reproduction. In a woman’s dream: desire for baby; responsibility of caring for baby; wor­ries about having healthy baby. In a man’s dream: desire for parenthood; weight of responsibility; fear of inability to pro­duce. In child’s dream: themselves at that age; feelings about a baby sibling.

Example: ‘I have my own baby who is lying in a cot in a bedroom looking very weak and pathetic with eyes closed. I know that he or she is getting weaker and weaker through lack of food and care. In fact the baby seems to be dying.

The feelings of guilt are terrible because I know it is my responsi­bility to do something to make it well. I keep saying to myself I must go and feed that baby—but I don’t. I just keep worry­ing and feeling guilty’ (JC). Because of circumstances we may not have been able to satisfy all our babyhood needs—we may have been weaned earlier than we wanted, our need for attention may have been unsatisfied—and these are shown as a baby in our dreams, as with JC. Dreams such as the above show how we sense the need of this pan of us to be cared for and nourished.

If some of these earliest needs are not met in some way, the development of our enthusiasm, our pleasure and ability to be involved and self-giving, may be cunailed.

Example: ‘I am 48, have two children in their late teens and definitely DO NOT want another baby. Nevertheless I have a recurring dream in which I am always in labour, expe­riencing no pain, and although there are nursing staff I am in some sort of laboratory, although everything is very pleasant. I never actually give birth and when I wake I always have a vague feeling of disappointment’ (VI). This dreamer’s con­scious decision to have no more children is in conflict with her biological urge for another baby.

Example: My mouth was full of what looked like liver. It was also coming out of my left ear. When I turned away from the mirror I saw medical people in caps and gowns who kept telling me to bear down. I then gave birth to a baby out of my mouth. I am an invalid and very sick at present’ (Mr MS). This man’s dream is about preparation for death.

The baby is the extraction of all that can live on after his present life is left behind in death. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Born in Hopkinsville, Kentucky on 18 March 1877, died Virginia Beach, January 1945. Cayce was an uned­ucated man who found he could put himself into a sleep state in which he had access to a collective mind or universal con­sciousness. Cayce was a very Christian man and couched his statements in a Biblical manner. In his sleep state, however, he could verbally respond to people’s questions and, using medical terms he did not know consciously, diagnose illness in people, even at a distance; speak foreign languages he had never learnt; get information he had no conscious access to. Because of this he was asked to the White House twice. At one period a hospital was built in which he worked with six doctors, diagnosing from his sleep condition. In this state, when asked how he could get information about the past, about people at a distance, etc., he replied that every person has access to what he called the cosmic mind while they sleep, but few people can bring this contact through to con­scious expression. He also maintained that prolonged working with one’s dreams gradually made conscious this contact with our cosmic life.

For Cayce, humans are cosmic beings.

A life­time was a brief interlude of learning in an eternal pilgrimage through time and space.

The conscious personality we so often raise so high is but a temporary experience assumed by an older larger being, the Individuality, or Self as Jung called it.

The ego dies at death, but the Individuality absorbs its experience. Dreams are the meeting point between this older self and the personality it assumes but briefly.

(Cayce’s biog­raphy is There Is A River by Thomas Sugrue. Cayce dictated 14 million words from his sleep state; a record of these is kept at the Association for Research and Enlightenment, Virginia Beach, Va.) ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Many dreams of dead people come from women who have lost their husband.

It is common to have disturbing dreams for some period afterwards; or not be able to dream about the husband (or wife) at all; or to see the partner in the distance but not get near. In accepting the death, meeting any feelings of loss, grief, anger and continu­ing love, the dream may become as below.

The example both shows the resolution of the loss, but also the paradox felt at realising the meeting was an inner reality. Example: ‘A couple of months ago as I was waking I felt my husband’s arm across me and most realistically experienced my hand wrapping around his arm and turning towards him (which I had done so often in his lifetime) and saying “1 thought you had died. Thank God you have not.” Then I awoke alone and terribly shaken’ (Mrs I).

A critic might say this is only a dream in which a lonely woman is replaying memories of her dead husband’s presence for her own comfort—thus her disap­pointment on being disillusioned. Whatever our opinion, the woman has within her such memories to replay. These are reality.

The inner reality is of what experience was left within her from the relationship. Her challenge is whether she can meet this treasure with its share of pain, and draw out of it the essence which enriches her own being. That is the spiritual life of her husband.

The aliveness’ of her husband in that sense is also social, because many other people share memo­ries of him. What arises in their own lives from such memo­ries is the observable influence of the now dead person.

But the dead also touch us more mysteriously, as in the next example. Example: In a recent news programme on tele­vision, a man who survived a Japanese prisoner of war camp in Singapore had been given a photograph of children by a dying soldier he did not know.

The man had asked him to tell his family of his death, but did not give his name.

The photo­graph was kept for 40 odd years, the man still wanting to complete his promise but not knowing how. One night he dreamt he was told the man’s name. Enquiries soon found the family of the man, who had an identical photograph. See husband under family. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

There is a level of human experience which is typified by intense emotional and physical response to life. Such emotions and bodily drives may remain almost entirely unconscious until touched by exploring our dream content in the right setting. When such feelings and bodily movements arise, as they do in dreams, we may be amazed at their power and clarity. See dream processing; sleep move­ments.

If we take away the images and events occurring in a dream and simply look to see what feelings or emotions are evident, the dream is often more understandable than if we try to interpret the symbols. Feelings in dreams are nearly always undistoned. We therefore do not need to interpret them, sim­ply to acknowledge them and see if we can recognise where they occur in waking life.

The images in a dream may be the way we unconsciously pictorialise our flux of feelings and the play of internal energy flows.

For instance love or sexual drive can give rise to physical movement—as in sexual intercourse. Repression of sex or love also represses such physical move­ments, leading to tension and conflict, which might be pre­sented in the drama of a dream.

Example: ‘I was with my wife, walking along a street, on holiday with her. But I felt awful tension. It was the son of stress I feel when I have turned off my sexual flow—as I have at the moment’ (Brian V). Brian can easily see the connection between the dream feelings and his everyday life, although sometimes we need to practise this. But the situation could as easily be expressed as a dream image of a blocked river.

The underlying feelings would then be less easy to grasp.

Example: ‘I was in a very ancient crumbling building, con­fronted by a large stone door, deeply engraved with many designs and creatures. I began to open the door and felt high feelings of anxiety. I realised this was an initiation and I must calm my feelings in order to pass beyond the door, i.e. if I were controlled by my feelings I would run away’ (Derek F). How we meet the emotions in our dreams illustrates our ha­bitual method of dealing with them.

The feelings of anxiety in Derek’s dream were met and moved beyond, but this is un­usual. This is because most of us change our direction as soon as there is a hint of fear.

The amount of nicotine and alcohol human beings consume suggests how poorly we meet anxiety. Going beyond fear or pain is an initiation which opens doors for us. We might now apply for the job, ask for the date, raise the issue, express the creativity, make the journey abroad, which anxiety previously kept us from. We see this in the next example: I had a ring on my marriage finger. It was a thin band of gold. I woke up frightened’ (Angela). Angela is not married and feels anxiety about the commitment.

Dreams give us a safe area to express emotions which might be difficult or dangerous to release socially. Anger in a dream may be expressing what we failed to express in a wak­ing encounter, or it might be our habitual response. It may also be directed against ourself. Dreams also contain many positive emotions. Sometimes they present a new aspect of feeling which is life enhancing.

A person who habitually felt at odds with her father and relatives experienced a dream in which she felt forgiveness for the first time. This was entirely new for her and led to a reconciliation with her family.

Some feeling states in a dream are subtle, and may be more evident in terms of the symbols than the feelings.

A grey drear environment suggests depression and lack of pleasure.

A sunny light environment with flowers and colour shows plea­sure and good feelings.

A country landscape depicts quite a different feeling state to a smoky busy city street. We can define these for ourself using the techniques described under dream processing.

Whatever feelings or emotions we meet in our dreams, many of them are bound to be habitual responses we have to life. Where these habits are negative we can begin to change them by working with the dream images as described in the last question under dream processing. See love; hostility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Over the years many theories to ex­plain the ‘why’ of dreams have been put forward. These range from dreams being messages from spirits; being results of food eaten prior to sleep; the mind freewheeling nonsensi­cally; the garbage disposal system of the mind; suggestions from waking experience; a computer reprogramming for the brain; to Freud’s wish fulfilment and Jung’s compensation theory.

If we do not argue any particular theory, however, then perhaps we see dreams as having a much wider function.

The most primal drives observable are survival, growth and repro­duction. Other urges, such as eating, social position, curiosity, are secondary.

The human animal appears to have survived and reproduced more capably after the development of self awareness, language and reasoning. With or without these, we remain an animal with a psychobiological nature. All ani­mals are known to dream. All animals share a certain situa­tion. They have an internal world out of which arises im­pulses (to eat, to mate, to avoid danger) and feeling reactions (anger, fear, anticipation). And they have an external world which confronts them with real survival dangers, sources of food, a mate, changes in environmental conditions.

A dream lies somewhere between these two worlds.

We can think of the human personality as being like a special son of cavity into which all these influences are dropped or are thrown. Physical sensations, internal drives and emotions, language, social rules, religious ideas; prompts to make decisions; news of war, massive media and advertis­ing information, are all dropped in.

The cavity has to deal with it, but as it is a mixture of things, many of which are in opposition, some sort of balance has to be kept. But how? And it cannot be simply a matter of throwing out all of one sort or aspect of things. Eradicating the memory of criticism might make us more calm, but it would limit the process of psychological growth, which has survival value.

Dreams can be seen to be connected with our survival and self regulating process. Because this involves all aspects of oneself and one’s experience, one cannot give dreams a single definition. They probably have many secondary functions, such as an interface to balance the internal and external influ­ences, to compensate between the inner needs and outer real­ity—a baby may miss its feed so, to cope with this primal need, it may dream of being fed. Traumatic or exterior danger­ous events, which cannot be processed immediately, can be stored and dealt with (experimented with or abreacted) while asleep. In higher mammals, infant traumas can be stored and dealt with in sleep when, or if, a stronger ego develops.

To meet the loneliness and isolation of consciousness’ or fears of death, the dream can link the waking self with its unconscious sense of unity or God.

To meet survival needs of primitive human beings prior to rational thought, the dream probably acted as a computer, synthesising experience and information, giving rise to creative solutions to hunting or social situations, presented as sleeping or waking imagery. This may explain why many pnmitive people say skills such as farming, weav­ing, writing, were told them by a vision of a god or goddess.

If we realise that the dream is an end product of a process which produces it, it enables us to see that the process’ (the survival function which regulates, compensates, links, prob­lem solves) can be accessed without meeting the dream. See sleep movements; dream process as computer; Adler; Freud; Jung. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘At about two or three in the morning my wife Brenda and I were suddenly awoken from sleep by a noise. As we lifted our heads to listen we identified it as the handle on our children’s bedroom door being turned.

The house only had two bedrooms, and the children’s room was directly opposite ours. Both of us had had the same thought—”Oh no, it’s the children again.” Much to our annoyance they had been waking in the middle of the night claiming it was morning and time to play. We had tried to suppress it, but here it was again.

As these thoughts went through our minds we heard the sound of feet clomping down the stairs. This was strange as the children usually stayed in their room. Brenda got up, de­termined to get whoever it was back into bed. I heard her switch the light on, go down the stairs, switch the sitting room light on, and I followed her via the sounds of her movement as she looked in the kitchen and even toilet—we didn’t have a bathroom. Then up she came again and opened the children’s door—strange because we had assumed it had been opened. When she came back into our room she looked puzzled and a little scared. “They’re all asleep and in bed ‘ she said. ‘We talked over the mystery for some time, trying to under­stand just how we had heard the door handle rattle then foot­steps going down the stairs, yet the door wasn’t open. Also, the door handles on our doors were too high for the children to reach without standing on a chair. There was a stool in the children’s bedroom they used for that, yet it wasn’t even near the door when Brenda opened it.

Having no answer to the puzzle we stopped talking and settled to wait for sleep again. Suddenly a noise came from the children’s bedroom. It sounded like the stool being dragged and then the door handle turning again but the door not opening. “You go this time” Brenda said, obviously disturbed.

‘I opened our door quickly just in time to see the opposite door handle turn again. Still the door didn’t open. I reached across, turned the handle and slowly opened the door. It stopped as something was blocking it. Just then my daughter Helen’s small face peered around the door—high because she was standing on the stool. Puzzled by what had happened, I was careful what I said to her. “What do you want love?” I asked.

‘Unperturbed she replied, “I want to go to the toilet.” The toilet was downstairs, through the sitting room, and through the kitchen.

‘Now I had a clue so asked, “Did you go downstairs be­fore?”

“Yes,” she said, “but Mummy sent me back to bed.” * (Tony C).

This is an unusual example of an out of body experience (OBE). Mostly they are described from the point of view of the person projecting, and are therefore difficult to corroborate. Here, three people experience the OBE in their own way. From Tony and Brenda’s point of view what happened caused sensory stimuli, but only auditory. Helen’s statement says that she was sure she had physically walked down the stairs and been sent back to bed by her mother. Tony and Brenda felt there was a direct connection between what they were think­ing and feeling—get the children back to bed—and what Helen experienced as an objective reality.

OBEs have been reported in thousands in every culture and in every period of history.

A more general experience of OBE than the above might include a feeling of rushing along a tunnel or release from a tight place prior to the awareness of independence from the body. In this first stage some people experience a sense of physical paralysis which may be fright­ening (see paralysis). Their awareness then seems to become an observing point outside the body, as well as the sense of paralysis. Then there is usually an intense awareness of one­self and surroundings, unlike dreaming or even lucidity. Some projectors feel they are even more vitally aware and rational than during the waking state. Looking back on one’s body may occur here. Once the awareness is independent of the body, the boundaries of time and space as they are known in the body do not exist. One can easily pass through walls, fly, travel to or immediately be in a far distant place, witnessing what may be, or appears to be, physically real there.

Sir Auckland Geddes, an eminent British anatomist, de­scribes his own OBE, which contains many of these features. Example: Becoming suddenly and violently ill with gas­troenteritis he quickly became unable to move or phone for help. As this was occurring he noticed he had an A and a B consciousness.

The A was his normal awareness, and the B was external to his body, watching. From the B self he could see not only his body, but also the house, garden and sur­rounds. He need only think of a friend or place and immedi­ately he was there and was later able to find confirmation for his observations. In looking at his body, he noticed that the brain was only an end organ, like a condensing plate, upon which memory and awareness played.

The mind, he said, was not in the brain, the brain was in the mind, like a radio in the play of signals. He then observed his daughter come in and discover his condition, saw her telephone a doctor friend, and saw him also at the same time.

Many cases of OBE occur near death, where a person has died* of a hean attack for instance, and is later revived. Be­cause of this there are attempts to consider the possibility of survival of death through study of these cases. In fact many people experiencing an OBE have a very different view of death than prior to their experience.

Early attempts to explain OBEs suggested a subtle or astral body, which is a double of our physical and mental self, but able to pass through walls. It was said to be connected to the physical body during an OBE by a silver cord—a son of life­line which kept the physical body alive. This is like the con­cept that the people we dream about are not creations of our own psyche, but real in their own right. Whatever one may believe an OBE to be, it can be observed that many people in this condition have no silver cord, and have no body at all, but are simply a bodiless observer, or are an animal, a geo­metric shape, a colour or sound (see identity and dreams).

The person’s own unconscious concepts of self seem to be the factor which shapes the form of the OBE. If, therefore, one feels sure one must travel to a distant point, then in the OBE one travels.

If one believes one is immediately there by the power of thought, one is there.

If one cannot conceive of existing without a body, then one has a body, and so on.

This approach explains many aspects of the OBE, but there is still not a clear concept of what the relationship with the physical world is.

The many cases of OBE which occur during a near-death experience also suggest it may be connected with a survival response to death; not necessarily as a way of trying to transcend death, but perhaps as a primeval form of warning relatives of death.

If there is survival of death, then the OBE may be an anticipatory form, or a preparatory condition lead­ing to the new form. See hallucinations, hallucinogens. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Most people who have kept a dog have witnessed it bark while it is obviously dreaming. Calling out during a disturbing or active dream is common to humans also. Some people sleep talk very frequently, however, so much so they worry in case they disturb the sleep of others, or say things they regret. In some cases they will even respond to questions. One such person told me that she went to her mother s room and asked her about whether or not to get married.

The dreamer was single, so the subject of the talk may have been bothering her. Perhaps the most prolific and creative of sleep talkers was Edgar Cayce. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Any dream in which an obvious change occurs in one of the dream figures shows transformation. Each of us go through major transformations during growth— not just physically, as when we change from a toothless baby to a walking, toothy child, but also psychologically.

Example: ‘On a hot summer day I was walking with a beautiful black woman through countryside. She stopped and told me she had a problem.

To show me she pulled down the strap of her dress. On her shoulder the black skin was peeling to reveal golden white skin underneath. She said that if she kept seeing me she would become completely white. She was going to ask advice from her mother about what to do. As we walked on two black men fought with me. They wanted to take her back to the village. I woke feeling I was winning’ (paraphrased from The Way of The Dream, Fraser Boa). Here the dreamer is relating well to his own feelings of sexuality and sensuality. However, he is beginning to see a female part­ner as a real person, not just as his sexuality paints her. Also, the reference to seeking advice from the mother suggests his ability to love is still not freed from emotional and erotic connections with his mother, and needs transforming. One often hears people, even in their 40s, saying It is difficult (developing a relationship) with that person because my mother doesn’t like them.’ The dreamer ‘fights’ the opposing drives, which want to take the man’s love back to the village, his childhood level of love—thus he moves towards becoming independent in love and life.

The transformation is towards mature love and relatedness.

For a further description of the major areas and themes of transformation, see individuation. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Expression of oneself, not simply ideas, but subtle feelings or realisations. Spontaneous speech, voice that speaks through or to one: our personality or mind is not a totally unified whole. Some aspects of self we may not identify with. Because we disown them, they become split from our main expression. Contacting them may be like meeting a stranger— thus in dreams they are shown as exterior to self, or a separate voice, perhaps disembodied. Also some aspects of self express spontaneously—see autonomous complex.

The voice may therefore be one’s intuition; expression of unconscious but not integrated parts of self; fears; the Self being met in the dream.

Example: ‘I was going mad. I was crawling around on my hands and knees and wailing and behaving in a most peculiar manner. I actually felt mad. But inside my head a tiny voice kept saying, “You aren’t completely insane yet—there’s still a chance.’’ People around me kept saying to each other, “We think she’s possessed by devils.’’ My sane voice then said *’Make the sign of the cross, cast out the evil spirit.” I kept trying to do that but my hands wouldn’t or couldn’t complete the sign. I woke still feeling disturbed’ (Margaret F). Margaret has fears about her sanity.

The voice here is that of her uncon­scious, speaking from a more whole view of her being. Such a voice might very well be the voice of one’s fears and confu­sion, however.

Example: ‘My present lover, Tony,’ and a man I had loved years before were standing side by side.

A voice was telling me to go to Tony (Miranda L). Here Miranda’s unconscious is summarising her feelings and helping her transfer her feelings of love connected with the past to her new lover. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Little Giant Encyclopedia

See Money.

The image of a cash register often means limited access to the world around you, which is blamed on money. You would rather have more than be more, indicating greed.

On the other hand, the cash register is a place where money is kept in an orderly fashion, protected and saved. In this case, Money is a symbol for your abilities and talents.

Folklore: Good omen, prosperity.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Little Giant Encyclopedia

See Thread.

A relationship that should be kept intact. Red yarn is the red thread that Ariadne gives Theseus to help him to find his way out of the Maze.

Folklore: A joyful event.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

A chest or box appearing in a dream delineates the way we keep hidden or store our emotions. Our most important ideals and hopes may need to be kept secret. It may also show the best in us; our best insights.

Emotionally, we need to give some limitation to our feelings and secret desires. In dreams a box whether plain or otherwise will show how we handle life.

Pandora’s Box and the story of how negativity was released into the world is the best example of a box image 011 a spiritual level. We need to be aware that care must be taken when first exploring the spiritual.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Mines

1- Often when we begin the process of learning about ourselves we need to uncover those parts we have kept hidden, and this is shown in dreams as excavating a hole or digging up an object.

2- On a creative level we may have realisations which arc hard to access and must be dug out.

3- Spiritually we need to have access to the characteristics of the unconscious.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Garbage in our dream creates a scenario where we are able to deal with those parts of our experience or our feelings which are like garbage, and need to be sorted in order to decide what is to be kept and what is to be rejected.

To be collecting garbage can indicate that we are making wrong assumptions.

2- Very often, garbage is the remains of food preparation. Often we are being alerted to what we need to do in order to remain healthv how we need to treat our bodies and how we need to create space in order to act correctly.

3- We may need to dispose of spiritual rubbish, and a dream about garbage can alert us that now is the time to do that.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- A tabernacle is a place where a sacred object is kept for safety; it also represents a temple.

To dream of one is therefore to be trying to understand our own need for sanctuary and safekeeping.

2- Man has always required a way to make certain objects sacred. Psychologically, to acknowledge such sacredness gives him a sense of permanence. He can have some sense that the world will continue to exist without him.

3- A tabernacle, by being sacred, becomes a world centre.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

also see Clothes

1- When an object is veiled in a dream, there is some kind of secret which needs to be revealed. We may, as dreamers, be concealing something from ourselves, but we could also be being kept in ignorance by others.

2- fhe mind has different ways of indicating hidden thoughts in dreams.

The veil is one of these symbols.

3- A veil can represent all that is hidden and mysterious - and this translates into aspects of the Occult.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- To dream of writing is an attempt to communicate information that one has. Sometimes the instrument we are writing with is important.

For instance, a pencil would suggest that the information is less permanent than with a pen, whereas a typewriter or word processor would tend to suggest business communication rather than personal.

2- Writing as a creative art is meaningful, and as a form of self- expression it perhaps allows us to communicate when spoken words are inadequate. In dreams we may learn how to communicate with ourselves in differing ways.

3- The dreamer may not be consciously aware of his spiritual progression.

Dreaming of writing suggests a subconscious record is being kept.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

Gypsy Dream Dictionary

Foundation; security You have some base, some foundation upon which to build. You are secure. But it also should be kept in mind that an anchor can hold you back when you want to be moving.... Gypsy Dream Dictionary

Gypsy Dream Dictionary

A well-kept cemetery; with flowers on the graves, indicates that you will have many friends who will be faithful to you for many years.

An unkempt cemetery indicates loss of friends; acquaintances rather than close friends.... Gypsy Dream Dictionary

The Language of Dreams

(see Burial, Death, Holy Ground, Tomb) Death, endings or conclusions, in literal or figurative terms.

If any of the headstones had writing, what did they say? Any messages here could prove quite helpful with your interpretation.

Being lost in, or terrified by: The fear of death, or the unknown.

Being buried in: Symbolic opportunity in disguise for resurrection and a new beginning. Burying in soil or mud was used in folk medicine as a sympathetic cure that fooled the spirits of sickness and death into believing they’d won.

Dreaming of a tomb represents a metaphorical opportunity for rebirth and a fresh start.

The word tomb actually means “tummy,” being the womb of the earth from which we are all born and return. Alternatively, a well-kept, elaborate tomb may reflect achievements and honors accumulated during your life.... The Language of Dreams

The Language of Dreams

The original clown, the jester represents the important things that get overlooked or ignored while absorbed in silliness.

Speaking or acting in “jest,” but not necessarily having people interpret this correctly.

In the Middle Ages, jesters relieved people from their worries for a while, and often kept royalty’ happy so that less severe judgments got handed out. In a modern

setting, this reflects taking much needed time to relax and enjoy life, and stop being such a difficult task master to yourself.

(see Cijstals, Stones, Gems)... The Language of Dreams


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