Matching | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Matching


COMBINE

Combining or matching coordinates such as pearls with gold, amber with gold, gems and pearls in a dream means benefiting others with one’s knowledge, counsel, good conduct or professional opinions.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

CLOTHES

Example: I am packing for a holiday, surrounded by a lovely selection of all sorts of clothes. I am matching outfits, shoes, scarves, handbags. It gives me great pleasure. I am wearing an old navy blue dress which is too shon for me. So shon I feel panic because there will not be enough time to change. I am now on the top deck of a bus. I have one bat­tered suitcase and am wearing the same dress, trying vainly to pull it down over my knees. Suitcase bursts open and it is full of old clothes fit for a jumble sale* (Valerie H). Clothes can mean many things, depending upon dream context. In the example the clothes are feelings of pleasure and confidence, and also discomfort and lack of confidence.

In general they indicate the stance or attitudes we use to meet other people or special situations such as work or dan­ger, protection, such as might be given by our feelings of reserve, shyness, anxiety or aggressiveness in fending off sex­ual or other advances, clothes depict self respect and how we see ourselves in society—the difference between what we want and what we feel others want of us; our clothes, espe­cially when we consider their colour, can also express our emotional condition and moods. Constance Newland gives the example of dressing in violet symbolising being inviolate sexually. Overdressed , unable to get clothes off: too cautious in relationships, difficulty in changing attitudes or self image; self protectiveness; avoiding intimacy.

Naked or see-through clothes: example: ‘I am at the doc­tor’s being examined.

It is always the same. I have all my clothes off and he examines me from the roots of my hair down to my toenails. I am just at the point where I am going to ask him for his diagnosis when he fades away’ (Miss L). Desire to be attractive and noticed, as in the example, where Miss L is enjoying an acceptable form of intimacy; being open about what you really feel; fear of other people seeing what you really feel, think and desire; anxiety about not being ade­quate socially, lacking ability to conform to social norm. See nude. Ragged or inappropriate clothes: feelings of inadequacy depressed feelings; rebellion against authority or society. Ar­mour, protective clothing : defences against internal anxieties, past hurts and external intimacy. Other people’s clothes: the social attitudes and responses we have adopted from others. Children’s, teenage clothes in adult’s dream: youthful or im­mature attitudes or behaviour. Undressing: revealing one’s real character; move towards intimacy. Dirty, untidy clothes: difficult or grubby feelings; one’s inner condition, such as an untidy mind, or grubby feeling values. Worn out or old clothes: attitudes ready to be left behind; old habits no longer useful; feeling worn out, old or tired. Tight clothes: being too restricted in attitude; being tight emotionally. New clothes: change in attitudes; new feeling about self. Someone else’s clothes: could be feelings from that person; their attitudes, memories. Man in woman’s clothes: unacceptability of male role, with its connection with breadwinning, aggression, being cannon fodder in war, homosexual tendency; desire for mother. Woman in male clothes: unacceptability of female role, motherhood, housewife; lesbian tendency; desire for fa­ther figure. Clothing inappropnate to dream surroundings: at­titudes or behaviour inappropriate to one’s situation. Chang­ing clothes: altering one’s mode of behaviour, role or mood. Idioms: dress to kill; dress up. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

WORD ANALYSIS OF DREAMS

Having written a dream down, by using highlighting pens to make all matching words the same colour, one can immediately see the main issues in some dreams.

Example: ‘We walk around, go upstairs, and I notice a staircase leading to a room or rooms. It goes up square, about eight steps in a flight, but round and round—spiral. I am scared by them, don’t want to go up, but am curious. We move in and nobody but myself has really taken any notice of the stairs. Nobody has been up . In one dream I try to go up but the children are scared for me. They plead, ‘Don’t go up Mum, just forget them”. Then I wake. In the next dream I wait till they are asleep. Half way up_ I am terrified but have to go on. Then I wake. Next dream I got up there. Then I woke’ (Ann H). Ann’s dream theme recurs, so is important to her. In marking just some of the words we see that the ‘up’ or go up’ is important. Childhood fears hold Ann back for a while, but she dares to climb.

If we look at the entries for climb and stairs, we see they depict taking steps towards ex­ploring the unknown, daring to explore one’s potential or opportunities.

By marking the words in this way we might also highlight certain statements otherwise hidden in the dream. Particularly watch out for the connections with the word T, such as I want, I do, I will, I have, I know, I cannot, etc. Example: ‘1 want to withdraw.’ I was full of sadness but was trying not to show it.’ ‘1 felt keyed up and ready to fight.’ Taking such statements out of context and looking for connections with everyday feelings oi situations often throws considerable light on the dream.

If what you realise is then considered in con­nection with the plot of the dream, the viewpoint your uncon­scious has on the situation might become evident.

For in­stance, the statement ‘I felt keyed up’ occurred within a classroom, and helped the dreamer understand the anger gen­erated at school. See amplification; plot of the dream; the comments on dream processing in the Introduction; dream processing; postures, movement, body language; settings; symbols and dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

COALPITS

To dream of being in the bottom of coalpits signifies matching with a widow; for he that marries her must be a continual drudge, and yet shall never sound the depth of her policies.... The Complete Dream Book

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The Complete Dream Book

VAULTS

To dream of being in hollow vaults, deep cellars, or the bottom of coal-pits, signifies matching with a widow; for he that marries her shall be a continual drudge, and yet shall never sound the depths of her policies.... The Complete Dream Book

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The Complete Dream Book

JOUSTING

Jousting in a dream represents a conflict within yourself.

The matching pair of horsemen riding against each other indicate that there are mirrored aspects of your personality which are struggling for dominance. Jousting may also represent a conflict with someone in your daily life. This person is someone that you feel a strong kinship with or in whom you see many similar personality traits to your own.... Dream Symbols and Analysis

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Dream Symbols and Analysis

CENTAUR

The half-beast half-man symbol of the zodiac infers the dreamer is coming to terms with the matching of two complete opposites in a harmonious way.... Dream Meanings and Dream Interpretation

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Dream Meanings and Dream Interpretation

PUNK

If you dream about punk style or music, or seeing punk rockers or musicians, this signifies rebellion. You are reacting against something or someone who clashes with what you believe in. This dream can also mean you are going through a phase of matching your outer behavior and appearance with your inner feelings and opinions.... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

BLACK

(1) A black hole or dark depths - for example, an unlit cellar or a deep well or oceanic depths - may represent the unconscious. This blackness mav be frightening, so long as the unconscious remains alien and unfamiliar. However, black can also be warm and comforting - which is whv insomniacs arc sometimes advised to close their eyes and imagine themselves wrapped.round in black velvet.

If you begin to trust your unconscious (which means trusting Nature), each previously horrifying or disgusting part of your unconscious will show itself in a new light, as something vou need for personal fulfilment. Putting vour consciousness

into the unconscious - becoming aware of it - means putting more and more light into the darkness.

If a star or other bright light appears in the blackness, this may be seen as a ‘light at the end of the tunnel’, that is, as a symbol of the ‘illumination’ - new wisdom or insight - that may be achieved by dwelling a while in the unconscious and making its better acquaintance.

(2) Black (particularly for white people) may symbolize evil.

If so, bear in mind that, as a general rule, what appears in your dreams is always some part of you, and that the so-called ‘evil’ (and therefore repressed) parts of you are really evil only if, because of neglect, they become rebellious, or if you let them take control away from your conscious self. These ‘evil’ things are transformed into good things - creative, and bringing fuller life, happiness and wholeness - when conscious and unconscious interact and establish a harmonious working relationship.

NB It is only Judaism, Christianity and Islam that have a thoroughgoing dualism of good and evil, and a matching moral dogmatism. In the earliest known forms of religion, and in traditions (such as the Hindu, Buddhist and Taoist traditions) that have not cut themselves off from their early roots, good and evil are opposite but equally necessary’ components of reality; and in mystical traditions (including Jewish, Christian and Islamic mysticism) even God is described as a coming together of opposites - good and evil, but also masculine and feminine.

(3) A person dressed in black may represent vour shadow.

(4) A black-skinned person (if you are white-skinned) may represent either the shadow or closeness to Nature.

(5) A black animal probably represents some unconscious repressed drive or emotion.

If the animal is fierce, this possibly means that something yrou have repressed is now urgently pressing you to give it your conscious attention and let it have some expression in your w aking life.

(6) Blackness (as in a black night, etc.) may simply signify’ diminished visibility, in which case the meaning of the dream may have something to do w ith a loss of orientation in your life. Do vou feel you don’t know’ which w’ay to go; or that you don’t hav e the energy’ or will to go in any direction? If so, make a pact w ith v our unconscious to die effect that, if it will tell you where you have the potential - and the need - to go, you will respond accordingly in your life. Then pav close attention

to the dreams that follow. (If you go the next few nights without dreaming - or, more precisely, without recalling any dreams - this probably means that you are backing out of the pact and setting up a defence against what you fear your unconscious might have to tell you.)

(7) Black may symbolize despair or deep depression.

If so, follow the advice given in (6) above.

(8) In many parts of the world black is associated with death.

It is possible, therefore, that this is what the colour signifies in your dream. Bear in mind, however, that death in a dream may refer to something internal: the ‘death’ - or the giving up - of something within you (for example, some irrational fear, or other negative attitude or emotion). See also Death.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

BASEMENT / CELLAR

Even though basements are becoming less common in newly built houses, they are still common in dreams. To dream that you are in a basement symbolizes being deep down in your unconscious mind, in the psychological storage space where you sort through things you are finding hard to understand. A basement is the place where you’ve shelved aspects of yourself that aren’t matching your ambitions in waking life. A basement can also indicate the power that is available to you provided you are willing to make use of it, or the way in which your current attitudes are derived from past assumptions and family legends.

To dream that the basement is in disarray and messy signifies some confusion which you need to sort out. It may also represent your perceived faults and shortcomings. Wine is traditionally kept in the cellar and the contents of your unconscious can similarly harbor special treats that you can bring out on special occasions. Try to decide if your dreaming mind took you into the cellar to confront an issue in your life or to make good use of talents you have been suppressing.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

BLIND PEOPLE AND DREAMS

People who are blind do dream. The dreams of people who have been blind from a very early age (called ’congenital blindness’) tend to be different to those who are blind now but who had sight before. Those who are congenitally blind often have dreams that include more instances of sounds. Both groups experience dreams as imaginatively rich as those of sighted people.

Dreams are a universal feature of the human mind. Carl Jung even believed that visions in our dreams offer glimpses into universal archetypes, instinctive primordial images derived from a collective unconscious built into the very structure of the human brain. You might think, then, that even blind people could tap into this instinctive pool of primordial images and see them in their dreams.

There have been studies into whether or not congenitally blind people dream in visual images, but the findings have been mixed— some studies conclude that congenitally blind people do not dream in visual images, whilst other reports conclude that may do. The general consensus is that although people who are blind certainly do dream, their dreams are believed to be visual only to the extent that they can see, or could see before their blindness, in their waking life. People who are blind from birth are believed to have dreams that are primarily auditory, with their other intact senses participating to about the same degree that they do in a sighted person’s dreams. Such people are not thought to dream in visual images. People who are legally blind but are able to see blurs of movement, light and color would have a visual dimension to their dreams matching what they see when they are awake.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia