modern

The meaning of Modern in dream | Dream interpretation


Not tempered by time and experience; compare to “antique”

Dream Dictionary Unlimited | Margaret Hamilton


Modern | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Modern


PICTURES

Pictures appearing before you in dreams, prognosticate deception and the ill will of contemporaries.

To make a picture, denotes that you will engage in some unremunerative enterprise.

To destroy pictures, means that you will be pardoned for using strenuous means to establish your rights.

To buy them, foretells worthless speculation.

To dream of seeing your likeness in a living tree, appearing and disappearing, denotes that you will be prosperous and seemingly contented, but there will be disappointments in reaching out for companionship and reciprocal understanding of ideas and plans.

To dream of being surrounded with the best efforts of the old and modern masters, denotes that you will have insatiable longings and desires for higher attainments, compared to which present success will seem poverty-stricken and miserable. See Painting and Photographs. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

STYLE

Characteristic of one’s spiritual status, i.E. Old-fashioned purist, worldly, modern, etc.; Research accordingly... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

INTERNET

1. Belief in modern technology; new ideas.

2. Desire to be “up to date.” 3. Need to make oneself heard by more peo­ple.

4. Need for knowledge and ideas.

5. Curiosity about the world. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

DREAMING OF ARMS, WEAPONS ETC.

Generally speaking, arms, firearms, ammunition and all other weapons-primitive or modern-symbolise power, strength, honour, superiority, vicotyr and grandeur for the persons who sees them in his dream.. He will acquire these according to his intellect and popularity. Any modifications and improvements in them denote added honour, power and strength.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

KHUTBAH

If a person sees himself delivering the khutbah from the member it means he will attain respectability and a vast kingdom on condition that he is worthy of such a position (i.e. if he is an Imaamor a Khateeb). But if he is not worthy of such a position it means he will be crucified. In modern times when kingship and crucifixion are hardly in vogue, the same dream could perhaps be interpreted as the bestowment of abundant wealth if he is worthy of such bestowment.

If not, he will be condemned to death and perhaps be hanged... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

AIR

Conditioning-symbolic of a luxury, modern comforts ... Christian Dream Symbols

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Christian Dream Symbols

AMBULANCE

In old dream dictionaries, dreaming about an ambulance could be labeled as a dream of warning. In more modern terms, your unconscious mind may by attempting to convey information that you have been unwilling to deal with consciously. Pay attention to your physical body and see if your health is an issue. Otherwise, this dream may be pointing to some urgent situation in your life. Consider all of the details in your dream. Examine your daily life and make an attempt to see if there is something that requires your immediate attention.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

DEER 

As like with most other animals, the deer in your dream may represent some aspect of your intuition or it may be a message from your unconscious. In some parts of Asia, deer are considered to be conductors of soul and thus the robes of shamans are usually made out of deerskin.

The Indians of North and South America also gave deer a spiritually important role. They believed that the souls of men passed into deer at the time of death. They also believed that a dying deer was a negative omen, which usually represented droughts that in turn foretold of very difficult times ahead. In the modern world, we generally see deer as gentle forest animals. Deer are characters in children’s stories and Santa Clause uses them to bring gifts to all. Thus, the deer in your dream may be a symbol of gentle and helpful parts of your psyche. In order to understand the message of the dream, think about what situation in your life would benefit from gentleness and soul fullness?... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

FROG

Old dream interpretation books say that frogs are a good omens and represent happiness and great friendships. From a more modern point of view, frogs may be considered symbols of the unconscious because they live in the water. Frogs also represent transformation of the positive kind.

A visitor and intended caretaker of your emotions.The frog, unless deformed negatively, removes the little irritations that interfere with your intuition and responses or reactions.Is the frog doing his job properly and acting in accordance with his duties?Are the patterns overcoming the frog? ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

KING

Control, Law, Authority Figure. Special someone in your life. In African folklore, the King is said to be “the one who holds all life, human and cosmic, in his hands; the keystone of society and the universe.” In the modern world, we may not associate the King with ultimate power, knowledge or wisdom. However, historically the mythical King was highly spiritual, was the center of the wheel of life and was said to have a regulatory function in the cosmos. Psychologically, the king and the queen are said to be the “archetypes of human perfection.” As a dream symbol, you can understand the king or queen in your dream by realizing that they represent your ability for independence, self-understanding and self-determination. They also represent inner wealth that will enable you to be your best and help you to achieve your goals. Consciously, you may never have the desire to be a king or queen, but psychologically, these figures are symbolic of our highest potential and our desire to be the “king or queen” of our own world and our own lives. On rare occasions and depending on the details of the dream, the king and queen may represent a powerful force that is unkind and tyrannical.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

STRANGER

The interpretation of seeing and interacting with a stranger, or strangers, in your dream depends on the details of your dream and on your personal belief system. Some Eastern cultures believe that the strangers in your dreams are spirits from another dimension. These spirits may be teaching you lessons or giving you specific messages.

The more modern approach to interpreting a dream with strangers in it is that they represent different sides or unfamiliar aspects of our personality.

The best way to tell is to “check inside” of yourself and simply try to understand the message of this dream. Whether the message is coming from your unconscious or from a different reality might be irrelevant.

The lessons gained through a dream are far more important then where they came from. Just remember: The mind that dreamt the dream also knows its source and meaning (and that is YOUR own mind). See also: People... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

APE

A dream of deceit, treacherous friends and associates (Artemidorus); Plato taught that the soul of a bad jester would return as an ape; it is a modern symbol of unclean- ness, lust, cunning, and malice. It was, however, an emblem of wisdom in Egypt and of the god Thoth, patron of the art of writing.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

BATTLE

To dream of being in battle implies trouble of a serious nature with friends; to overcome indicates triumph (Gypsy). Evidently the realities of warfare were too grim and too close to admit the rule of contraries to apply to this dream, to which modern interpreters, however, attach an erotic meaning.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

BEAR

The dream of a rich powerful enemy; to overcome a bear in your dream is a favorable sign (Artemidorus). Although the cult of Artemis worshiped the she-bear, in Christian thought the ferocious animals are usually suspect. Modern symbol of ferocity and surliness. Freudian sex dream.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

BEE

”A dream both good and bad. Good if the bees sting not, bad if they sting. Bees flying about the ears signify harassment by enemies, but to beat them off without being stung signifies victory over foes. Seeing bees profit to country people and trouble to the rich.

To dream that they make their honey in the house signifies dignity, eloquence and success to the occupants.

To be stung by a bee denotes vexation and trouble.

To take bees augurs profit.

A dream of bees is auspicious to plowmen and to thosei profiting from this industry, to others this dream signifies trouble by reason of the noise bees make, wounds by reason of their sting, and sickness by reason of their honey and wax. Jupiter is said to have been nourished by bees, and in his infancy Pindar was supposedly fed on honey instead of milk. They were sacred to Artemis and they appear on her statues and on her coins; Mahomet admits bees to Paradise. In modern Christian art they symbolize industry.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

BEETLES

This dream signifies that some slander is circulated concerning you; to kill the beetle is to overcome it (Raphael). The beetle was held as sacred by the Egyptians, a symbol of virility, new life and of eternity (Budge). According to Brewer, it is the modern Christian symbol of blindness.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

BODY

To dream that your body is robust denotes authority, that it is weak denotes failing or infirmity of the part in question (Artemidorus); here the ancients and moderns meet undoubtedly the dream of any part of the body, whether of one’s own or that of another, is resultant upon physical stimulus.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

BRAMBLES OR BRIARS

A dream of desire in love, a wish for the unattainable (Artemidorus); Freud and modern symbolism alike corroborate this interpretation.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

BRIDE OR BRIDEGROOM, BRIDESMAIDS, USHERS, ETC

Erotic dreams, all of them, announce the moderns. Dreams denoting grief and disappointment, declares Raphael, who invariably places an unfortunate construction upon all dreams of an erotic nature.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

BULL

Violent enemies and slander are forecast by this dream (Artemidorus); an erotic dream (Freud and Jung); the Assyrian symbol of royal authority and of the sun, sacred also to the Egyptians and the Romans; its modern symbolism is strength, yet throughout the whole of. the gypsy dream interpretation it bears an evil meaning, due either to the legend of the golden calf, or to the apparently evil construction of all erotic and phallic symbols.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

BUTTERFLY

Lack of fixed purpose, restlessness, inconstancy (Gypsy). It was the Greek symbol for the psyche or soul, and the Christians also employed it as a symbol of the resurrection; the significance of its bursting from its chrysalis into glory, was, however, lost during the middle ages, when men ceased to observe nature, and the shallow symbolism became established and continues to the present day; modern symbolism, sportiveness, living in pleasure.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

CAMEL

A dream of many burdens patiently borne (Artemi- dorus); modern symbol of patience and submission.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

COCK

A dream denoting pride, success and power, combined with watchfulness (Gypsy); modern symbol of vigilance, formerly held sacred to the sun; the herald of Apollo.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

CRAB

The dream of a ruinous lawsuit (Gypsy); a modern expression for an ill-tempered person; the tenacity of the crab has become symbolic.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

DOG

A fortunate dream on the whole, denoting faithful friends (Gypsy). Modern symbol of fidelity, anciently held sacred to the Lares, i. e., the home.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

FLEET

To dream of a fleet of vessels promises fulfillment of hopes (Gypsy). Ships symbolize hopes both in ancient and modern symbolism.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

FLYING

Invariably a happy dream, auguring beautiful things to come. Modern dream interpreters, however, classify it as a typical dream induced by vertigo, etc.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

GOOSE

A bad dream for a single man auguring a silly and incompetent wife (Raphael). Modern nursery lore represents the goose as an emblem of silliness, despite that fowl’s illustrious reputation in both Rome and Egypt.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

LANTERN

To dream of carrying one on a dark night foretells riches; to stumble denotes trouble; for the light to be darkened or extinguished, poverty (Artemidorus). Modern symbol of lanterns, leadership; Christian symbol, piety and truth; the tarot gives it as a symbol of wisdom.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

MASTIFF

A dream of a strong, powerful, but unknown, friend; to be bitten by one, injury from a friend (Gypsy). Jung and Freud classify all dreams of animals or of being bitten by animals as erotic, or sex dreams.

The mastiff is the modern symbol of loyalty, gentleness and fidelity.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

NAKED

A dream of sickness, poverty, affront, fatigue. Invariably ominous according to older interpreters. Modern students, however, attribute to it a-totally different significance; holding it in some instances as a wish dream, in others as an erotic dream and again as a dream symbolizing freedom from social restraint.

The theory of the subconscious and its warnings, etc., is, however, in accord with the older school, for the dream of nakedness might readily originate in fear, especially with women who habitually devote a large amount of thought to clothes.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

PEACOCK

To see one spreading its tail denotes wealth and a handsome wife; for a woman this is a dream forecasting the promotion of her husband to popular favor.

To a young woman it symbolizes vanity and the attempted seduction by a coxcomb (Gypsy). The early Christians held it as the symbol of immortality. It was also the bird of Juno, who cursed whosoever should pluck its feathers; their children should never be well, nor should men come for their daughters; hence the superstition attached to these feathers.

The modern symbol of pomp and vanity.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

RAINBOW

A change in the dreamer’s present condition; a rainbow in the East denotes benefits to the poor and the sick; in the West good for the rich but not for the poor. Overhead, a change in fortune; sometimes ruin and death to the dreamer and his family. On the right it is good, at the left ill, judging right and left according to the sun, but wherever it appears it brings good to poverty and affliction by changing the air (Artemidorus). Modern oneirocritics regard the rainbow as an invariable sign of failure.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

RAVEN

A bad dream, trouble and mischief brewing (Raphael). Conjugal infidelity (Gypsy). A symbol of knowledge (Hartmann); the raven was once dedicated to Apollo; modern symbolism, however, regards this bird as an omen of misfortune (Hulme). ... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

SERPENT

A dream of temptation and of evil (Gypsy). Obviously the dream interpreters of modern times have accepted the Christian and Jewish symbolism, rather than that of more remote antiquity. Freud and Jung, however, revert to more primitive times and interpret this as an erotic dream. Raphael interprets the serpent dream as one of “a deadly enemy bent on your ruin; to kill one denotes success over your enemy.” The serpent was the ancient Egyptian symbol of wisdom and of the sun; curled in a circle it represented time without end; twisted around a staff, it denoted health. “More subtle thou art than any beast of the field” (Bible). ... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

THIRST

To quench with clear water, sound sleep, contentment; to drink tepid or foul water, discomfort lasting through the night (Gypsy). A gypsy interpretation coinciding with the ultra-modern school.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

VALLEY

To dream of walking in a pleasant valley denotes sickness (Raphael). An interpretation in conformity with the modern theory of physical stimuli, and attributing hills, valleys, mountains, etc., to sensations in various parts of the body.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

WOUNDS

A dream denoting affliction of the wounded parts (Gypsy). Interpretation coincides with that of modern writers.... The Fabric of Dream

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The Fabric of Dream

BAKERY

Dreaming of a modern day bakery with all the good smells and smiling people denotes much richness and success for you.

To dream you are making the bread shows you will be making more money in your endeavors.... Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

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Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

FROG

Traditionally, frogs are a good omens and represent happiness and great friendships. From a more modern point of view, frogs may be considered symbols of the unconscious, as they live in the water. Frogs also represent transformation of the positive kind.

If you dream of eating frogs then you will find very little to gain in current relationships and losses associated with love affairs.

If you dream of catching a frog then the carelessness you exhibit concerning your health and well being will greatly distress those who care for you.

If you see frogs in a low marshy area this is a sign of ill luck and losses. Seeing frogs in clean, green grass denotes the making of an even tempered friend and confidant.... Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

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Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

MEDICINE MAN

To be helped be an Indian medicine man is the best kind of good luck in business omen as this shows that you can expect to receive the backing of powerful friends are backers that will assure your success and your fortune. Unfortunately if you are beyond help, this shows that your destiny is to fail unless you change into more modern ways of doing things.... Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

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Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

BLACK PERSON

Depends which skin colour one has.

If white: one’s natural drives, feelings about coloured people; or if per­son is known, what you feel about them.

If black or brown: one’s own cultural feelings; same as any person’ dream.

Example: \ was in a cubicle or small toilet with a very black coloured woman. She told me there was something wrong with her vagina. She was undressed. I rubbed her va­gina and we both felt enormous passion. I then awoke but couldn’t at first remember the dream. I have refrained from sexual intercourse for some weeks, as I always feel shattered/ tired afterwards. Anyway I woke very wet, yet couldn’t re­member any orgasm. I could remember some question of sex as I awoke. Then I remembered the dream and continued it in fantasy. I experienced powerful urges to find a woman to have a non-committed sexual relationship with. But in the end I wanted to share my feelings with my wife, but she seemed deep asleep and unresponsive. When I slept again I dreamt I was in London, had got off one bus, but was not at any desti­nation. I was standing about not making a move to find my direction. Then I began to look’ (Alfred C).

To understand this dream in some depth it is helpful to think of a sexual drive as a flow, like a river. As such it can be blocked, in which case it will seek an alternative route. Sexual energy or flow is not simply a mechanical thing, ihough; it is also deeply feeling in its connection with the most profound sides of hu­man life such as parenthood and the canng and providing for young. In the history of white people a great deal of sexual frustration has arisen out of the ideas of sin and guilt in their religion.

A view arose for the white race that the black races had an easier and less frustrating relationship with the natural —which includes not only sexuality but the body as a whole, and nature also. So when Alfred dreams of the black woman, he is meeting what is natural and flowing in himself, but which he has blocked by his will because he felt shattered after sex.

The pan about the bus shows him trying to find a direction in which his sexual feelings could move satisfyingly in connection with other people.

Unfonunately, as Jung points out in Man and His Symbols, people in modern society, whether black, yellow, brown or white, have lost their sense of nature and the cosmos as being anything other than processes without consciousness or living feeling. Jung says. No river contains a spirit, no tree is the life principle of a man. no snake the embodiment of wisdom. No voice now speaks to man from stones, plants, and animals, nor does he speak to them believing they can hear.’ The im­portance of such dreams as Arthur’s is that it shows the pas­sionate relationship between our personality and the pnmitive and natural.

A black person, born and bred in a modern setting, would most likely dream of a black bushman to depict their own natural drives. See identity and dreams; Africa; sex in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DREAM ANALYSIS

Sigmund Freud was the founder of modern therapeutic analysis of dreams. Freud encouraged clients to relax on a couch and allow free associations to arise in con­nection with aspects of their dream. In this way he helped the person move from the surface images (manifest content) of the dream to the underlying emotions, fantasies and wishes (latent content), often connected with early childhood. Be­cause dreams use condensation—a mass of different ideas or experiences all represented by one dream image or event— Freud stated that the manifest content was meagre’ compared with the ‘richness and variety’ of latent content.

If one suc­ceeds in touching the feelings and memories usually con­nected with a dream image, this becomes apparent because of the depth of insight and experience which arises. Although ideally the Freudian analyst helps the client discover their own experience of their dream, it can occur that the analyst puts to the client readymade views of the dream. Out of this has occurred the idea of someone else ‘analysing or telling us about our dream.

Carl Jung used a different approach. He applied amplifica­tion (see entry), helped the client explore their associations, used active imagination (see entry) and stuck to the structure of the dream. Because amplification also put to the client the information and experience of the therapist, again the dreamwork can be largely verbal and intellectual, rather than experiential.

In the approach of Fritz Perls (gestalt therapy) and Moreno (psychodrama), dream analysis is almost entirely experiential.

The person exploring the dream acts out or verbalises each role or aspect of the dream.

If one dreamt of a house, in gestalt one might stan by saying I am a house’ and then go on to describe oneself just as one is as the particular house in the dream.

It is important, even if the house were one existing externally, not to attempt a description of the external house, but to stay with the house as it was in the dream. This is like amplification, except the client gives all the information. This can be a very dramatic and emotional experience because we begin consciously to touch the immense realms of experience usually hidden behind the image. When successful this leads to personal insights into behaviour and creativity. See dream processing; amplification; gestalt dream work.

dream as a meeting place Any two people, or group of people who share their dreams, particularly if they explore the associated feelings and thoughts connected with the dream images, achieve social intimacy quickly. Whether it is a family sharing their dreams, or two fnends, an environment can be created in which the most profound feelings, painful and wonderful, can be allowed. Such exposure of the usually pri­vate areas of one s feelings and fears often presents new infor­mation to the dreamer, and also allows ventilation of what may never have been consciously expressed before. In doing so a healing release is reached, but also greater self under­standing and the opportunity to think over or reconsider what is discovered.

Herbert Reed, editor of the dream magazine Sundance, and resident in Virginia Beach, Va., initiated group dreaming ex­periments. It started because Reed noticed that in the dream groups he was running, when one of the group aired a prob­lem, other members would subsequently dream about that person’s problem. He went on to suggest the group should attempt this purposely and the resulting dreams shared to see if they helped the person with the problem.

The reported dreams often formed a more detailed view of the person’s situation. In one instance the group experienced many dream images of water. It aided the woman who was seeking help to admit she had a phobia of water and to begin thinking about learning to swim. In another experiment, a woman presented the problem of indecision about what college to transfer to and what to study. Her group subsequently said they were confused because they had not dreamt about school. Several had dreams about illicit sex. though, which led the woman to admit she was having an affair with a married man. She went on to realise that it was the affair which was underlying her indecision. She chose to end the affair and further her career.

Whatever may be underlying the results of Reed’s expen- ments, it is noticeably helpful to use the basic principles he is working with. They can be used by two people equally as well as a group—by a parent and child, wife and husband, busi­nessman and employee. One sets out to dream about each other through mutual agreement. Like any undertaking, the involvement, and therefore the results, are much more pro­nounced if there is an issue of reasonable importance behind the experiment. It helps if one imagines that during sleep you are going to meet each other to consider what is happening between you. Then sleep, and on waking take time to recall any dream. Note it down, even if it seems far removed from what you expected. Then explore its content using the tech­niques in dream processing.

Example: My wife and I decided to attempt to meet in our dreams. I dreamt I was in a room similar to the back bedroom of my previous marnage. My present wife was with me. She asked me to help her move the wardrobe. It reminded me of, but did not look like, the one which had been in that bed­room. I stood with my back to it, and reached my hands up to press on the top, inside. In this way I carried it to another wall. As I put it down the wood broke. I felt it ought to be thrown away’ (Thomas B). Thomas explored the dream and found he connected feelings about his first marriage with the wardrobe and bedroom. In fact the shabby wardrobe was Tom’s feelings of shabbiness at having divorced his first wife. In his first marriage, represented by the bedroom, he always felt he was married for life. In divorcing, he had done some­thing he didn’t like and was carrying it about with him. He says ‘1 am carrying this feeling of shabbiness and second best into my present relationship, and I need to get rid of it.’

dream as a spiritual guide Dreams have always been con­nected with the spiritual side of human experience, even though today many spiritual leaders disagree with consider­ation of dreams. Because dreams put the dreamer in touch with the source of their own internal wisdom and certainty, some conflict has existed between authoritative priesthood and public dreaming.

A lay person finding their own ap­proach to God in a dream might question the authority of the priests. No doubt people frequently made up dreams about God in order to be listened to. Nevertheless, despite opposi­tion, Matthew still dreamt of an angel appearing to him, Jo­seph was still warned by God to move Jesus; Peter still dreamt his dream of the unclean animals.

The modern scientific approach has placed large question marks against the concept of the human spirit. Study of the brain’s functions and biochemical activities have led to a sense of human personality being wholly a series of biological and biochemical events.

The results of this in the relationship between doctor and patient, psychiatrist and client, some­times results in the communication of human personality be­ing of little consequence. It may not be put into words, but the intimation is that if one is depressed it is a biochemical prob­lem or a brain malfunction.

If one is withdrawn or autistic, it is not that there is a vital centre of personality which has for some reason chosen to avoid contact, but that a biochemical or physiological problem is the cause—it’s nothing personal, take this pill (to change the biochemistry, because you are not really a person). Of course we have to accept that human personality must sometimes face the tragedy of biochemical malfunction, but we also need to accept that biochemical and physiological process can be changed by human will and courage.

In attempting to find what the human spirit is by looking at dreams, creativity stands out.

The spiritual nature may not be what we have traditionally considered it to be.

An overview of dreams and how dreamers relate to them suggests one amaz­ing fact. Let us call it the ‘seashell effect’. When we hear sounds in a shell that we hold to our ear, the noises heard seem exterior to oneself, yet they are most likely amplification of sounds created in our own ear, perhaps by the passage of blood. Imagine an electronic arcade machine which the player could sit in and, when running, the player could be engulfed in images, sounds, smell and sensation. At first there is shim­mering darkness, then a sound, and lights move. Is it a face seen, or a creature. Like Rorschach’s ink blots, the person creates figures and scenes out of the shapeless light and sound.

A devil appears which terrifies the player. People, de­mons, animals, God and angels appear and fade. Scenes are clearcut or a maelstrom of movement and ill-defined activity. Events arise showing every and any aspect of human experi­ence. Nothing is impossible.

If, on stepping out, we told the player that what occurred was all their own creation due to unconscious feelings, fears, habits, thoughts and physiological processes occurring within them, like the seashell effect, they might say ‘Good God, is that all it was, and I thought it was real. What a waste of time.’

Whether we can accept it or not, as a species we have created out of our own longings, fears, pain and perhaps vi­sion, God, with many different names—politics, money, dev­ils, nationalism, angels, an, and so on and on. All of it has flowed out of us. Perhaps we even deny we are the authors of the Bible, wars, social environments. Responsibility is diffi­cult.

It is easier to believe the source is outside oneself. And if we do take responsibility for our amazing creativity, we may feel ‘is that all it is—me?’ Yet out of such things, such fears, such drives, such unconscious patterns as we shape our dreams with, we shape our life and fonune, we shape our children, we shape the world and our future.

The shadow of fear we create in our dream, the situation of aloneness and anger, becomes a pattern of feelings, real in its world of mind. We create a monster, a Djinn, a devil, which then haunts and influences us. Or with feelings of hope, of purposiveness and love, create other forces in us and the world. But we are the creator. We are in no way separate from the forces which create our existence. We are those creative forces. In the deep­est sense, not just as an ego, we create ourselves, and we go on creating ourselves. We are the God humanity has looked so long for.

The second aspect of the human spirit demonstrated by dreams is consciousness.

The unconscious mind, if its func­tion is not clogged with a backlog of undealt with painful childhood experience and nonfunctional premises, has a pro­pensity to form gestalts. It takes pieces of experience and fits them together to form a whole. This is illustrated by how we form gestalts when viewing newsprint photographs, which are made up of many small dots. Our mind fits them together and sees them as a whole, giving meaning where there are only dots. When the human mind is working well, when the indi­vidual can face a wide range of emotions, from fear and pain to ecstasy, this process of forming gestalts can operate very creatively. This is because it needs conscious involvement, and if the personality is frightened of deep feeling, the uniting of deeply infantile and often disturbing cxpcrience is cut out. Yet these areas are very rich mines of information, containing our most fundamental learning.

If the process is working well, then one’s expenence is gradually transformed into insights which transcend and thereby transform one s personal life.

For instance, we have witnessed our own binh in some manner, we also see many others appeanng as babies. We see people ageing, dying. We see millions of events in our life and in others.

The uncon­scious, deeply versed in imagery, ritual and body language, out of which it creates its dreams, picks up information from music, architecture, traditional rituals, people walking in the street, the unspoken world of parental influence.

The sources are massive, unbelievable. And out of it all our mind creates meaning. Like a process of placing face over face over face until a composite face is formed, a synthesis of all the faces; so the unconscious scans all this information and creates a world view, a concept of life and death.

The archetypes Jung talks of are perhaps the resulting synthesis of our own expenence, reaching points others have met also.

If so, then Chnst might be our impression of humanity as a whole.

If we dare to touch such a synthesis of experience it may be seanng, breathtaking.

It breaks the boundaries of our present personality and con­cepts because it transcends. It shatters us to let the new vision emerge. It reaches, it soars, like an eagle flying above the single events of life. Perhaps because of this the great hawk of ancient Egypt represented the human spirit.

Lastly, humans have always been faced by the impossible.

To a baby, walking and not wetting its pants is impossible, but with many a fall and accident it does the impossible.

It is a god in its achievement.

To talk, to fly heavier-than-air planes, to walk on the Moon, were all impossible. Humans challenge the impossible every day. Over and over they fall, back into defeat. Many lie there broken. Yet with the next moment along come youngsters with no more sense than grasshoppers, and because they don’t know what the differ­ence is between right and left, do the impossible. Out of the infinite potential, the great unknown, they draw something new. With hope, with folly, with a wisdom they gain from who knows where, they demand more. And it’s a common everyday son of miracle. Mothers do it constantly for their children—transcending themselves. Lovers go through hell and heaven for each other and flower beyond who they were. You and I grow old on it as our daily bread, yet fail to see how holy it is. And if we turn away from it, it is because it offers no certainties, gives no authority, claims no reward.

It is the spir­itual life of people on the street. And our dreams remember, even if we fail.

For this is the body and blood of the human spirit.

dream as a therapist and healer There is a long tradition of using dreams as a base for both physical and psychological healing. One of the earliest recorded incidents of such healing is when Pharaoh’s ‘spirit was troubled, and he sent for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men; and Pharaoh told them his dream, but there was none who could interpret it’. Then Joseph revealed the meaning of the dream and so the healing of Pharaoh’s troubled mind took place (Genesis 41).

The Greek Temples of Asclepius were devoted to using dreams as a base for healing of body and mind (see dreams and ancient Greece).

The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy also (see Iroquoian dream cult).

The dream process was used much more widely throughout his­tory in such practices as Pentecostal Christianity, shaktipat yoga in India, and Anton Mesmer’s groups (see sleep move­ments).

Sigmund Freud pioneered the modern approach to the use of dreams in therapy, but many different approaches have developed since his work. Examples of the therapeutic action of gaining insight into dreams are to be found in the entnes on abreaction, recurring dreams, reptiles.

The entry on dream processing gives information about using a dream to gain insight and healing. See also dream as meeting place.

A feature which people who use their dreams as a thera­peutic tool mention again and again is how dreams empower them. Many of us have an unconscious feeling that any impor­tant healing work regarding our body and mind can only be undertaken and directed by an expert, the expert might be a doctor, a psychiatrist, psychotherapist, or osteopath. Witness­ing the result of their own dream process, even if helped by an expert, people feel in touch with a wonderful internal process which is working actively for their own good. One woman, who had worked on her dream with the help of a fnend (non expert), said It gave me great confidence in my own internal process. I realised there was something powerful in myself working for my own good. It was a feeling of cooperating with life.’ One is frequently amazed by one’s own resources of wisdom, penetrating insight and sense of connection with life, as met in dreamwork. This is how dreams play a pan in helping one towards wholeness and balance.

The growing awareness of one’s central view of things, which is so wide, piercing and often humorous, brings developing self respect as the saga of one’s dreams unfolds.

There may be no hint of this, however, if a person simply records their dreams without attempting to find a deeply felt contact with their contents.

It is in the searching for associ­ated feelings and ideas that the work of integrating the many strands of one’s life begins. Gradually one weaves, through a co-operative action with the dream process, a greater unifica­tion of the dark and the light, the painful and transcendent in one’s nature.

The result is an extraordinary process of educa­tion. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

INFORMATION PROCESSING

According to modem theory, the amount of information the human brain can hold is more than is held in all the books in the Library of the British Museum. Gradually it is becoming recognised that informa­tion gathered is not simply what we ‘learn’ from vocal com­munication, or read, or set out to leam. In fact an unimagin­able amount of information gathering has gone on prior to speech, and goes on at an unimaginable speed prior to school years. Consider a small preschool child walking into the gar­den It has learnt gradually to relate to muscular movement, balance and its own motivations and feeling reactions in a way enabling it to walk. It has already grasped thousands of bits of ‘information’ about such things as plants in the garden, the neighbour’s cat, the road outside, possible dangers, safe areas. Stupendous amounts have already been absorbed about interrelationships.

An idea of ‘reality’ in the sense of what is probable, and what would be dangerously out of norm, has been formed. We gather information in ways little recognised. How our parents relate to their environment and to other people is all recorded and leamt from, bringing about enor­mous ‘programming’ affecting how we act in similar circum­stances.

As explained in the entry on the dream as spiritual guide, we have great ability in ‘reading’ symbols, ritual, an, music, body language, architecture, drama, and extracting ‘meaning’ from them. So we have immense stores of information from these sources. Work done with people exploring their dreams over a long period suggests that some of these information resources are never focused on enough to make conscious what we have actually learnt. Sometimes it is enough simply to ask oneself a question to begin to focus some of these resources. Such questions as what social attitude and response to authority did I learn at school? What feeling reaction do I get when I am in the presence of someone I know well? These may help to bring to awareness aspects of information gath­ered but remaining unconscious. These unfocused, or uncon­scious, areas of information can explain why we have appar­ently irrational feeling responses to some people or situations.

the body A lot of what we call the unconscious are basic physiological and psychological functions.

For instance in a modern house, when we flush the toilet, we do not have to bring a bucket of water and fill the cistern again.

A self regu­lating mechanism allows water to flow in and switches it off when full. This is a clever built-in function that had to be done manually at one time. Nowadays we have built into some dwellings fire sprinklers or burglar alarms. Through re­peated actions over thousands or millions of years, many ba­sic functions, or functions only switched on in emergencies, have been built into our being. We do not need to think about them, just as we do not have to give awareness to the fire sprinkling system or toilet each time we walk through a room or flush the toilet. They are therefore unconscious.

Research with animals in connection with rewards and conditioned reflexes has shown that by gradually leading an animal towards a certain performance by rewarding it each time it gets nearer to the goal, it can do the most amazing things. It can increase the circulation of blood to its ear, slow its heart, and in fact influence body functions which were thought to be completely involuntary. Where human beings have learnt to use some of these techniques—such as raising the temperature of an arm at will, or helping to increase the efficiency of the immune system—the actual processes still remain unconscious. In general, however, the body’s func­tions are thought to be outside our awareness, and so are one of the areas of the unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

JUNG, CARL (1875-1961)

Son of a pastor, his paternal grandfather and great grandfather were physicians. He took a degree in medicine at the University of Basle, then specialised in psychiatry. In early papers he pioneered the use of word- association, and influenced research into the toxin hypothesis regarding schizophrenia. Jung’s addition to modern therapeu­tic attitudes to dream work arose out of his difference of view with Freud regarding human life. Jung felt life is a meaningful experience, with spiritual roots. His interest in alchemy, myths and legends added to the wealth of ideas he brought to his concept of the collective unconscious.

The subject of sym­bols fascinated him and he devoted more work to this than any other psychologist. He saw dream symbols, not as an attempt to veil or hide inner content, but an attempt to eluci­date and express it.

It is a way of transformation where what was formless, non-verbal and unconscious moves towards form and becoming known. In this way dreams ‘show us the unvarnished natural truth’. By giving attention to our dreams we are throwing light/upon who and what we really are—not simply who we ait/as a personality, but who we are as a phenomenon of cosmic interactions.

Jung recommended looking at a series of one’s dreams in order to develop a fuller insight into self. In this way one would see cenain themes arising again and again. Out of these we can begin to see where we are not balancing the different aspects of ourself. See abreaction; active imagination; ampli­fication; archetypes; black person; collective unconscious; compensatory theory; creativity and problem solving in dreams; dream analysis; Fromm, Erich; identity and dreams; individuation; lucidity; mandala; dream as spiritual guide; unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

REPTILES, LIZARDS, SNAKES

Our basic spinal and lower brain reactions, such as fight or flight, reproduction, attraction or repulsion, sex drive, need for food and reaction to pain. This includes the fundamental evolutionary ability to change and the urge to survive—very powerful and ancient processes. Our relationship with the reptile in our dreams depicts our relat- edness to such forces in us, and how we deal with the im­pulses from the ancient pan of our brain.

Modern humans face the difficulty of developing an inde­pendent identity and yet keeping a working relationship with the primitive, thus maturing/bringing the primitive into an efficiently functioning connection with the present social world.

The survival urge at base might be kill or run, but it can be transformed into the ambition which helps, say, an opera singer meet difficulties in her career. Also the very primitive has in itself the promise of the future, of new aspects of human consciousness. This is because many extraordinary human functions take place unconsciously, in the realm of the reptile/spine/lower brain/right brain/autonomic nervous sys­tem. Being unconscious they are less amenable to our waking will. They function fully only in some fight or flight, survive or die, situations.

If we begin to touch these with consciousness, as we do in dreams, new functions are added to conscious­ness. See The dream as extended perception under ESP and dreams.

frog

Unconscious life or growth processes which can lead to transformation (the frog/prince story); the growth from child­hood vulnerability—tadpole to frog—therefore the process of life in general and its wisdom. Frogspawn: sperm, ovum and reproduction.

lizard

Example: ‘My wife and I saw a large lizard on the wall near a banana. It was there to catch the flies.

The lizard turned so it was facing away from us—head up the wall. We then were able to see it had large wing-like flaps which spread from its head in an invened V. With amazement we saw on these flaps wonderful pictures, in full colour, of birds. In fleet­ing thoughts I wondered if the bird “paintings” were to attract birds, or were some form of camouflage. But I felt cenain the lizard had “painted” these wonderful pictures with its uncon­scious an’ (David T). Generally, a lizard is very much the same as a snake, except it lacks the poisonous aspect; aware­ness of unconscious or instinctive drives, functions and pro­cesses. In the above dream, the banana is both David’s plea­sure and sexuality, while the lizard is the creativity emerging from his unconscious through the attention he is giving it—he is looking at the lizard. Chameleon: either one’s desire to fade into the background, or adaptability.

snake

Example: A small snake about a foot long had dropped down my shirt neck. I could feel it on the left side of my neck Fearing it was poisonous and might bite me, I moved very slowly. At one point I put my head on the ground, hoping the snake would wish to crawl away. It did not. Then I was near an elephant I loved, and hoped it would remove the snake. It did not. Even as I slept I felt the snake was an expression of the attitude of not shanng myself with anybody except family’ (David T).

For months prior to the above dream David had experienced a great deal of neck pain. After dis­cussing the dream with his wife, and realising much of his thinking and feeling was intumed, the pain disappeared. So the snake was both poisoner’ and ‘healer’. This may be why snakes are used as a symbol of the medical profession.

The Hebrew word for the serpent in the Garden of Eden is Nahash, which can be translated as blind impulsive urges, such as our instinctive drives.

So, generally, snakes depict many different things, but usu­ally the life process.

If we think of a person’s life from con­ception to death, we see a flowing moving event, similar in many ways to the speeded up films of a seed growing into a plant, flowering and dying.

The snake depicts the force or energy behind that movement and purposiveness—the force of life which leads us both to growth and death. That energy —like electricity in a house, which can be heat, power, sound and vision—lies behind all our functions. So in some dreams the snake expresses our sexuality, in others the rising of that energy up our body to express itself as digestion—the intesti­nal snake; as the healing or poisonous energy of our emotions and thoughts.

Example: ‘I was in a huge cathedral, the mother church. I wanted to go to the toilet/gents. As I held my penis to urinate it became a snake and reached down to the urinal to drink. It was thirsty. I struggled with it, pulling it away from the un­clean liquid. Still holding it I walked to a basin and gave it pure water to drink’ (Bill A). Here the connection between snake and sexuality is obvious. But the snake is not just Bill’s penis.

It is the direction his sexual urges take him he is strug­gling with. Out of his sense of love and connection with life— the cathedral—he wants to lift his drive towards something which will not leave him with a sense of uncleanness. Snake in connection with any hole: sexual relatedness.

A snake biting us: unconscious worries about our health, frustrated sexual impulse, our emotions turned against our­selves as internalised aggression, can poison us and cause very real illness, so may be shown as the biting snake. Snake biting others: biting remarks, a poisonous tongue.

A crowned or light-encircled snake: when our ‘blind impulses’ or instinctive or unconscious urges and functions are in some measure inte­grated with our conscious will and insight, this is seen as the crowned snake or even winged snake. It shows real self awareness and maturity. In coils of snake: feeling bound in the ‘blind impulses’ or habitual drives and feeling responses. Instincts and habits can be redirected, as illustrated by Hercu­les’ labours. Snake with tail in mouth: sense of the circle of life—binh, growth, reproduction, aging, death, rebirth; the eternal. Snake coiling up tree, pole, cross: the blind instinctive forces of life emerging into conscious experience—in other words the essence of human expenence with its involvement in pain, pleasure, time and eternity; the process of personal growth or evolution; healing because personal growth often moves us beyond old attitudes or situations which led to inner tension or even sickness. Snake in grass: sense or intuition of talk behind your back; danger, sneakiness. Colours: green, our internal life process directed, perhaps through satisfied feelings, love and creativity, into a healing process or one which leads to our personal growth and positive change; white, eternal aspect of our life process, or becoming con­scious of it; blue, religious feelings or coldness in relations. See colours; anxiety dreams; death and rebirth, the self under archetypes; dreams and Ancient Greece; cellar under house, buildings; hypnosis and dreams; jungle; paralysis. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

ACROBAT

The desire for, or fear of, risky endeavors.

It is the image of modern man’s fight for survival.

The dreamer is looking for validation, Applause.

According to Freud, this dream image appears to those who, as children, have witnessed sexual inter- course among adults. Even if it does not necessarily always address a question of sexuality, it clearly refers to the body and physicality. How are you treating your own body.7 How agile do you feel. This image can appear when you are not physically active enough.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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BOULDER / PIECE OF ROCK

Mountain. Intellectual, physical, and / or emotional strength. Hardy. Something is in your way.

According to ancient Egyptian interpretation: if you climb a rock, you will be confronted with obstacles. According to Freud, a phallic symbol. Modern interpretation: You are striving for something higher, but it is not going to be easy.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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CAR / DRIVING

One of the most frequently occurring symbols of modern times. It points to the transformation into something new. Individual means of transportation, status symbol, motorized energy—it is also a sexual symbol. In a modern sense, usually a symbol for being on the go every day, and of psychological strength and mobility. As with the “Chariot” in the Tarot, it always presents a question about our road in life and how we are charting our course. As a symbol of environmental pollution, it often points to the need for inner growth.

Are you driving yourself or is somebody else driving you? What kind of an auto is it? For example, a sports car relates to virility, a utility vehicle to control. What color is the car? Are you fixing it up or Driving it?

According to Freud, in psychoanalysis a car is often the symbol for treatment. As Freud sees it, a slow car is making an ironic statement about the slowness of the analytical process.

According to Jung, it is a symbol for moving away. See Wagon.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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COLOR

Psychological experience. It points out specific colors—see Red, Yellow, and Blue. Colors are very important if they are a function of a symbol. According to some modern dream research, people who dream in color are particularly temperamental.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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