The meaning of movies in dream | Dream Interpretation


Complete Dictionary of Dreams | Dr. Mıchael Lennox

The creation of your own version of life is featured in this dream. Movies as a symbol connect to our memories and desires as well as a need to control our reality. Movies are so ingrained in Western culture that it is difficult to separate them out from the human experience as something distinct from how we live life day to day. This is especially so with regard to the way in which a film can capture historical events and present altered versions of moments in time that may be seen by future viewers as actual facts. Research has shown that the areas of the brain that are stimulated by the images we see on film are the same as those activated by real events. This blurs the line between fantasy and reality in an alarming way. Movies and dreams are not very different from each other. What is captured on film has a way of becoming real in the imagination of the human race. Even the most unbelievable storyline is made possible through the magic of film. In this way, the symbolic meaning of the movies is the incredible drive the human race has to make our most passionate desires come to life.

A common dream that many people report is to have the sense that the dream itself is a movie.

The first distinction that should be made when considering the symbolic meaning of a movie in a dream is which side of desire the film is addressing. One connects to manifesting a fantasy into reality and the other embodies rewriting history as you perhaps wish it was. In either case, the presence of a movie in a dream is likely expressing a wish to have more control over how life is being perceived. Ask yourself what area of your life is feeling unreal or that you wish were different.

Dreamers Dictionary | Garuda

Vision: If you’re standing in front of a movie theater: others are keeping secrets and it’s bothering you. Being inside a movie theater: you are in the dark and undecided about a certain matter.

Depth Psychology: Is it possible that a movie of your life is playing? The dream might also be an indication of your insecurity or that others want to lead you Mup a garden path.” Who is trying to fool you? Are you fooling yourself? What movie is playing in the theater (drama, comedy, western, etc.)?

Gypsy Dream Dictionary | Raymond Buckland

See also Television / Video.

To be watching a movie is to yearn for glamour in your life. You have been living too sheltered an existence and need to let down your hair a little more. Sometimes the type of movie you are watching can be pertinent:

Comedy: Don’t take life too seriously. When you get uptight, examine the situation and try to find a humorous side to it.

Musical: Don’t let your love of the music of life cause you to ignore your responsibilities.

Mystery: Something is not as it should be. Don’t get complacent, but be always on the alert. Simple, seemingly innocent words and actions can be signs of coming intrigue and complications.

Romance: This could be a good time for romance. Keep your ears and eyes open.

Tragedy: Be aware of tragedies and of impending drama, but always look for the silver lining that will be there somewhere.

War Movie: You are building up to a battle within yourself. Bring your problems out into the open and examine them. Face up to problems and work out solutions.

Mystic Dream Book | Internet Archive - Anonymous

Frivolous invitations. Do not trust fair women.

New American Dream Dictionary | Joan Seaman - Tom Philbin

Need to escape into another world.

Psycho Dream Interpretation | Ella Freeman Sharpe

See Theater.

The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams | Stearn Robinson - Tom Corbett

The omen here depends on whether or not you enjoyed what you saw; if you did, the augury is one of pleasant social times ahead; but if you were depressed, displeased, or disgusted, you are being warned against being deluded by a dishonest avowal of love or cheated by an insincere declaration of friendship.

The Language of Dreams | Patrica Telesco

(see Costumes, Masks, Theater)



Movies | Dream Interpretation

Keywords of this dream: Movies

Christian Dream Symbols

Symbolic of being entertained. Movies can also be used to show you something important... Christian Dream Symbols

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

An ax is generally associated with destruction. We use it to break things up, and in popular horror movies it is used to kill people.

The ax can also be used to carve and create art, furniture or other tools.

If your dream was violent, then you may be experiencing frustration, anger and hostility.

If there was no violence in your dream, then the ax may be positively interpreted as a symbol of productivity and creativity. Either way, an ax is a powerful tool, and as a dream symbol it may be saying something about your personal power and its expression.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Dividing, death, pain, strength, and strenuous labors. Strength of character. Strength, perseverance.

An axe is generally associated with destruction. We use it to break things up, and in popular horror movies it is used to kill people.

The ax can also be used to carve and create art, furniture or other tools.

If your dream was violent, then you may be experiencing frustration, anger and hostility.

If there was no violence in your dream, then the ax may be positively interpreted as a symbol of productivity and creativity. Either way, an ax is a powerful tool, and as a dream symbol it may be saying something about your personal power and its expression.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

Dream of going to the cinema (movies) and its a warning to not be taken in by appearances.... Tryskelion Dream Interpretation

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Points to faithfulness and deep emotions, but also to the desire for relaxation.

It is the symbolic color of the soul, since blue also symbolizes the depth of the sea and the expanse of the sky. It also stands for the unconscious, as well as isolation, expanse, and infinity. It stands for pure, clear Water, distant mountains, and sky. Blue symbolizes nature that has been saved. Pay attention to the degree of brightness!

The color blue may also indicate fogginess (like drunkenness); see also Alcohol.

It is also a symbol of depression (“I am feeling blue”). And last, but not least, a symbol of cold (particularly metallic blue).

Blue can also, as in the case of “blue mountains,” symbolize the connection between heaven and earth— spirit and nature. Blue coats were worn by wise women, pointing to our connection to water, mist, and heaven.

Blue is also the color of the cape worn by Mary; the womb that bore Christ is a symbol for the “sacred vessel.”

In alchemy, blue is the color of the moon, standing in for silver, and blue is also the color of the soul.

As opposed to Red, blue indicates a soothing, cool state (in color therapy, blue is considered relaxing).

In the Orient, blue is the equivalent of black and is considered the color of the underworld.

In Egypt, the underworld of Osiris is depicted in blue or black.

The Sufi (a mystical circle, followers of Mohammed) saw blue as the center of a flame, the expression of the highest form of passion.

A reflection of blue as an expression of passion is also found in our culture in the phrases “the blue hour / ’ and “blue movies”; also the “blues” in music.

ASTROLOGY: A symbol of Neptune.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Little Giant Encyclopedia

In mythology, the marksman / hunter is often depicted as a centaur, the wild rider. Today he would be seen as the cowboy in Western movies. In antiquity, the feminine equivalent was the Amazon. Human enthusiasm and concentration is part of the dream image that is integrated with the intensity of the animalistic “fire.” The hunter craves a goal, which can refer to nostalgia and wanderlust; however, the goal is always also “he himself.” See Arrow, Goal.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Changes and transformation starting from below (the unconscious) and coming to the surface (consciousness), or vice versa.

A frequent symbol in fairy tales and movies, suggesting personal growth and wholeness.

The landings in a staircase correspond to the dreamer’s energy centers (the chakras). Are you going up the stairs or coming down? According to Freud, going up symbolizes sexual union.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

The Language of Dreams

(see Movies,TV)

Limits or boundaries that are set by an outside source, some of which may hamper free expression of ideals or beliefs.

Oppressive moralism from others with regard to your lifestyle and its outward representations.

Not getting complete information; having the truth clouded for the sake of political correctness.... The Language of Dreams

The Complete Dream Book

This Is a fortunate dream, if the goldfish are swimming either in a pool or bowl, especially for someone who is planning to go on the stage or into the movies.... The Complete Dream Book

Dream Meanings of Versatile

On a spiritual level, melting suggests losing form and has sometimes had connections with the overcoming of negativity and evil. This is pictured most successfully in horror movies and dream images often follow the same format.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are watching a movie suggests that you are watching life pass you by. Perhaps you are living vicariously through the actions of others.

If you dream that you are playing a role in the movie, something from your unconscious is about to be revealed. It can also mean you are getting ready to play a new role in your life and go down a new path.

To dream of seeing static or “snow” on a movie screen represents your refusal to see the truth in a situation. You might believe in someone who is deliberately trying to deceive you.Movies in dreams may also represent memories or scenes from your past. Also see below for “Movie Character”, “Movie Credits”, “Movie Theater” and “Movie Villain”, all listed below.... My Dream Interpretation

Complete Dictionary of Dreams

The DVD has entered our consciousness as our connection to an immediate source of entertainment and the escape that movies provide. As a symbol in a dream, DVDs relate to a desire to remove yourself from your day- to-day life and immerse yourself in a pleasant sense of escape and relaxation.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Complete Dictionary of Dreams

This modern-day invention of moving pictures captured through a portable and ubiquitously accessible format pervades our culture in such an enormous way that there are literally dozens of ways in which the concept of “video” connects to other elements of symbolism. At the heart of it, video relates to our ability to create in our own image the experience of being human. We make movies and those movies become a permanent record of our journey. Once the lofty realm of only a privileged few, the technology of video has been made accessible to the masses. There are two sensibilities that must be considered when this symbol appears in a dream.

The first is the creative impulse to capture an element of life unfolding.

The ability to record, pause, fast-forward, and watch at your leisure instills a sense of control in the meaning of video in a dream.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

A closet may represent a place to store or hide people or things. Movies and other narratives often show people hiding in a closet. People with an unsavory past are said to have “skeletons in the closet.” In more modern times, the closet has also come to signify the unveiling of previously hidden aspects of the self, as in “coming out of the closet.”... Dream Symbols in The Dream Encyclopedia

The Element Encyclopedia

Collective unconscious’ is the term Carl Jung used to describe the part of the unconscious that everyone has access to, a sort of psychic storehouse for all humankind.

The contents of this storehouse are called ‘archetypes’: patterns and symbols that can be found within the unconscious of everyone. These archetypes represent the broad human memory within each of us. They appear as mythical images that occur in every culture throughout recorded history—the images appearing in the dreams of our ancestors are those that speak to us today.

According to Jung, dreams are attempts to guide the waking self. He thought that the purpose of life—and for him, dreams play an important role in it is to understand and integrate all parts of ourselves; dreams are simply one aspect of the self trying to communicate with the conscious part. Dreams don’t disguise the unconscious, they reveal it, through archetypes.

Sigmund Freud disagreed with Jung, as he believed that dreams were disguised attempts to hide, not reveal, true feelings from the waking mind. Freud did, however, recognize a concept of ‘archaic remnants’, inherited—rather than learned—beliefs, through which basic emotions and responses are represented.

For example, the mother figure is a universal symbol of nurturing and protection.

Today, most dream researchers believe that we are more likely to see archetypal figures in our dreams at transition points in our lives than at other, more stable times. Change generally brings about anxiety and self-reflection. Going from education to the workforce, singlehood to marriage, or childless to parent are some typical archetypal transitions. Many of these archetypes are very familiar to us already, because they can be found in myths, legends, fairy tales, books and movies: the wicked stepmother, the authoritative father and the vulnerable maiden. We are as familiar with the superhero in films like Spiderman or Batman, as we are with the character of the dastardly joker or villain. All these characters are archetypes, and enduring representations of basic human qualities, instincts and experiences.

The first step in analysing an archetype, as with any symbol, is through personal reference. For example, a dream about monsters may refer to our inner fears, but it may also be a carry-over from the horror film you watched the same night. The next step is to take into consideration the other images in the dream, as well as the feelings and general atmosphere.

When archetypes appear in your dreams you will rarely feel indifferent to them and your instinctive response is crucial to the interpretation. Do they make you feel angry, inspired, sad, protective, frustrated or liberated? Never forget that such images spring from the deepest levels of the unconscious, and it is up to you to discover why they have been conjured up.

Jung contributed to our understanding of dream archetypes with constructs of his own, which some dream researchers find helpful in interpreting dreams. Although Jung believed that there is no fixed number of archetypes which we can simply list and memorize, he did believe that most archetypes are aspects of the following constructs: the persona, the anima and the animus, the ego, and the shadow. As you interpret your dreams you might want to consider these constructs along with the other archetypal images suggested in the pages of this book.... The Element Encyclopedia

The Element Encyclopedia

[DREAM IMAGES: PRINCESS; YOUNG GIRL ETC.]

The damsel in distress may be the oldest female archetype in all of popular literature and the movies. She is beautiful, vulnerable and in need of rescuing.

If this image appears in your dreams, it may suggest your intense desire to be rescued or protected by a loved one; it may also suggest the need to go it alone. When disappointed, a damsel must go through a process of empowerment and learn to take care of herself in the world.... The Element Encyclopedia

The Element Encyclopedia

If you watched a fantastic firework display in your dream, are you feeling particularly good about yourself right now? Has there been a personal triumph? Or should you interpret the dream sexually, as fireworks are symbols of sexual climax in the movies. On the other hand, fireworks may denote explosions of furious rage and any dream explosion may reflect pent-up fury or frustration that is building up in waking life. Is there something in waking life that is making you tense and angry? Dreams in which you watch helplessly as a raging inferno destroys your home may be warnings from your unconscious to fit a smoke alarm in your home or office, but they may also have highlighted your current overheated emotional stage. It is important to ask yourself who or what is provoking your rage and whether the full force of your anger is about to be unleashed in waking life. And what would the results of the explosion be— devastation that all you have worked for has gone up in smoke, or liberation that you have burned your bridges and can arise energized from the ashes?

To dream of a fireman represents selfcontrol and your ability to deal with your energies, burning desires or emotional emergencies in the waking world. To dream that you caused a fire may be a warning from your unconscious that you are playing with fire and may be in danger of getting your fingers burned if you go ahead with a certain project or get involved with a certain person.

If you find yourself on fire, your passions may be consuming you and you may feel hopeless and trapped in waking life. If, however, you managed to put a fire out, this shows that you are asserting control over the fire raging within you.

If someone else started a fire, your unconscious may have been telling you to watch that person carefully in waking life or to carry out some simple safety checks.... The Element Encyclopedia

The Element Encyclopedia

Hollywood and movies dominate associations with Los Angeles, so could you be yearning for more attention or action in waking life?... The Element Encyclopedia

The Element Encyclopedia

A television may represent your mind with its stream of thoughts, and a radio your inner voice with its communications. The programs you watch and listen to are intimate and objective representations of what is going on in your mind, so pay particular attention to what is on your dream television or radio.

If you dreamed of adjusting a radio dial or television remote control to find a particular station or channel, perhaps your dreaming mind portrayed you as trying to tune into your intuition. A dream in which you channel surf may suggest your waking restlessness or boredom. As well as helping us stay abreast of current events, radios and televisions also offer mental stimulation and DVDs and VCRs allow us to record anything we want at a time that suits us.

If you dreamed of listening to a radio broadcast, TV program or trying to record a specific program, always try to recall its subject matter.

If it was a faithful replica of a something you saw and heard on television or radio last night, your dreaming mind is simply playing out the images again in your sleep or perhaps reproving you for watching rather than living life.

If it was a variation of the program’s theme or you felt deeply involved with the program (which may or may not have been an exact rerun of the original), the chances are that it reveals a facet of your waking life, or news from within yourself. Did you identify with one of the characters, or with a specific situation or topic in the show, because you have found yourself in a similar state in the past or fear that you will in the future? Alternatively, if you dream about radio or television program but do not feel that involved in the action, your unconscious could be providing you with light relief from waking anxiety.

If you see yourself on TV, your unconscious may be attempting to communicate emotions and ideas that you feel unable to express in waking life. The image may also arise from a desire for attention or recognition from the people in your life.

If you received static instead of a clear signal, this suggests an inability to make contact with your innermost thoughts. The image would be intensified if you watched a DVD recording of a program, as this indicates memories that are recorded or deeply embedded in your unconscious.

The purpose of TV or radio programs such as talk shows, soap operas or movies—is to entertain, enlighten and divert us from our everyday lives. Your unconscious may have used the plot or situation from an entertainment show of this kind and used it as a vehicle to replay an event in your past or to act out a current concern. Modern dream superstition suggests that if you enjoy dreaming about watching television, you will be successful in life; but if you are bored or upset by what you see, you will be led astray as your lack of concentration will mean you are unable to achieve success.... The Element Encyclopedia

The Element Encyclopedia

In dreams, fictional characters that do not exist in everyday life may appear.

For example, you may dream of sharing a birthday party with a twin sister you don’t have in waking life; perhaps a character from your favorite TV show, movie or novel appears in your dreams. All your dreams are connected in some way with your life, so just because these people don’t exist in real life doesn’t mean they are less meaningful in dreamland or have any less resemblance to your waking life. In general, fictional characters exaggerate the qualities found in someone close to you so you can better understand the dynamics of the relationship or situation; one might say that the characters are often one dimensional so that their message is more easily understood. For example, Darth Vader from the Star Wars movies may represent, or highlight, a mean streak that your boss is displaying. And fictional characters can also reflect an aspect of yourself that has relevance to your waking life.

If this is the case, they usually do so to let you know the source of your current problem or to remind you of qualities you didn’t know you had. For example, dreaming about Scarlet O’Hara from Gone with the Wind may remind you that you are tougher and more resilient than you think you are.... The Element Encyclopedia

Dreampedia

‘If the dream is a translation of waking life, waking life is also a translation of the dream.’ René Magritte

If you have ever wondered why dreams often appear so difficult to make sense of, it is because the information they contain is presented in a different language; the language of symbols: of people alive or dead, known and unknown, animals both domestic and wild, landscapes and buildings familiar and strange, or any number of symbolic objects such as shapes, colors, signs, numbers, jewelry, food, clothing and so on.
These images are your own thoughts, feelings and ideas turned into a series of pictures like ordinary scenes in your daily life. For example, if you feel overwhelmed you may have a dream you are swimming but finding it hard to keep your head above water. If you feel confused you may have a dream when you are wondering about lost in a dark forest. The number of symbols and images that your mind can translate into dream pictures is practically endless. Words just can’t convey the countless powerful feelings that symbols do. These symbols are often chosen from something that has caught our attention in waking life, triggering a memory, conflict or concern that resonates both in the present and in the past. One tried-and-tested way to uncover the meaning of your dream images is by direct association. You simply go with the first thing that pops into your head when a trigger image from your dream is given. If you don’t immediately get an associative thought, try working through all your feelings about that image. For example, if you saw a caterpillar in a dream. Do you like caterpillars or do you find them a bit creepy? Try to discover what the image means to you right now, for the meanings of your symbols will change over time. The more you work with your dreams, the more familiar you will become with your personal images. You’ll probably find that you dream the most about the things that you are familiar with every day: your family, your colleagues, your friends and your pet. Each time you dream about these familiar things they will have personal significance to you alone. The great majority of dreams are not to be taken literally and you need to do a bit of detective work to get to the real message. Just because you dream that a friend is dying does not mean that he or she will die, but rather that they are going through a period of enormous change. In fact, interpreting dreams literally can be harmful. As pointed out earlier, you have your own set of unique dream images and symbols. If you love dogs, what a dog means to you and what a dog means to someone who can’t stand dogs will be very different. Always bear in mind that your dream symbols and images are unique to you. Although the images and symbols in your dreams do need to be interpreted, their purpose isn’t to mystify you. They are simply trying to get their message across in the best way that they can. If you do find yourself getting tense, confused or frustrated when trying to interpret a dream, let it go. Dream interpretation is best approached with an open mind and in a relaxed state.
You don’t need to interpret every single dream you have. In the same way that some movies are more compelling and thoughtprovoking than others, some dreams, like those when you do fantastic things like flying into space or surfing in Hawaii, are simply to be enjoyed. You don’t always have to dig deep for meaning. It’s good to be aware that a dream might contain a message of importance, but don’t get obsessed with finding meanings for every single detail —just interpret what you can. Dreams, like life, are full of big and little stuff. Don’t sweat the ‘small stuff’.
... Dreampedia

Dreampedia

Trust in dreams, for in them the gateway to eternity is hidden.” KHALIL GIBRAN

Dreams and their purpose

Consider dreams like home movies that each person produces in response to their daily experiences. These movies are meant to clarify certain situations and support the person. With sufficient knowledge, they can become a sort of spiritual guide, since oneiric thoughts are a window to the subconscious where, frequently, hidden feelings and repressed needs are stored without us realizing. Even then, there are people who question the importance of dreams. Some scientists, for example, believe that the content of dreams is simply a random mix of the many electronic signals the brain receives. Others, however, find all types of messages in even the simplest dreams, and end up distancing themselves from daily reality in favor of oneiric activity. Neither extreme is advisable. Each dream is undoubtedly a journey into the unknown, but, at the same time, modern psychology has allowed us to understand a good part of their structure. One of the conclusions drawn from the study of dreams confirms this: dreams can be a priceless aid to the imagination, but above all when it comes to solving problems. You just have to know how to listen to them, because their content tends to have a direct relation to the emotional challenges you are experiencing.

Each dream is a journey to the unknown with an implicit personal message. Although it is the content of the episode that determines our emotional state, dreaming in black and white indicates a possible lack of enthusiasm or nostalgia for the past. These dreams are an invitation to live with more intensity and enjoy the present. Still from the film Viaje a la Luna (Méliès, 1902).

It is known that in times of crisis, our oneiric production increases significantly, both in quantity and intensity. Should we consider this “surplus” to be positive? Yes, as long as one makes an effort to remember and interpret the dreams, since, as we will see further on, they have a valuable therapeutic potential. For example, if a couple is going through a critical phase, remembering and analyzing usually helps them understand the subconscious reactions they have to the situation. In other words, dreams are an excellent tool to get to the bottom of emotional conflicts. Knowing the causes is an essential step to resolving the problems, regardless of what course you take. The English psychologist David Fontana, whose books have been translated into more than twenty languages, said it clearly: “In listening to my patients’ dreams in therapy sessions, I have observed how, often, these can take us right to the root of the psychologic problem much quicker than other methods.” Although, we shouldn’t fool ourselves: dreams are a mystery that can rarely decipher everything. But if a certain level of interpretation helps us understand ourselves better, what more can we ask for? From a practical point of view, our own oneiric material can be very useful.

In dreams, relationships with others are a recurring theme. The people that appear in our dreams, especially strangers, represent facets of ourselves that the subconscious is showing us.

Well-known writers such as Robert Louis Stevenson, William Blake, Edgar Allan Poe, and Woody Allen have had faith in this, acknowledging that part of their works have been inspired by dreams. The discoveries of Albert Einstein or Niels Bohr (father of modern atomic physics), among other celebrated scientists, had the same origin. In any case, these examples shouldn’t confuse us: no dream can tell you what path to follow through symbolic images without the intellect to decipher them.

Prosperity, precognition, and pronostics

What’s more, judging by some documented cases, we can even reap material gain from dreams. There is proof of some people that had premonitory dreams managing to earn significant sums of money thanks to their oneiric “magic.” The most spectacular case was in the fifties, when an Englishman named Harold Horwood won a considerable number of prizes betting on horses. His dreams transmitted clues as to the winning racehorse to bet on. Unfortunately, these types of premonitions don’t come to everyone. However, anyone has the opportunity to discover the greatest treasure of all—knowledge of one’s self—through their dreams. We’ve all experienced the feeling of having lost control of our lives at some point. We might feel like others are deciding things for us or that we are victims of our circumstances.

Our “dream-scapes” contain valuable information about our desires and concerns; they could also function as a forecast of some aspect of our future. According to ancient tradition, dreaming of stars predicts prosperity and spiritual wealth. “Starry Night” (Van Gogh, 1889).

However, many psychologists disagree with this. That is, they argue that daily events are not coincidences but rather meaningful deeds that reflect the inner state of the individual.

Dreams and thoughts

According to these experts, luck is a pipe dream, something that does not exist, since that which we consider the result of coincidence is none other than the natural manifestation of our thoughts and attitudes. We are basically creator, not passive receivers or victims of the events that unravel in our lives. An example that illustrates this idea perfectly is the story of the old man who threw rocks into the sea. One day, someone asked if he ever got bored of the simple game. The old pebble thrower stared at his questioner and gave an answer he’d never forget: “My small stones are more important than they seem, they provoke repercussions. They will help create waves that, sooner or later, will reach other other side of the ocean.” What does this have to do with dreams? It’s simple: as we’ve just seen, we are the only ones responsible for our daily experiences, no matter how hard that is to believe. Therefore it shouldn’t be too difficult to take control of our lives; we just have to listen to the messages in our interior, that is, our oneiric thoughts, of which we are ultimately the authors.

Visualizations

In this way, thanks to dreams, our two existences—conscious and unconscious—can work together to make our lives more creative and free. An important part of this process is getting to know and understanding better the process of thought. One of the most beautiful and commonly used visualizations in yoga reminds us of this: “In the bottom of the lake of our thoughts is a jewel. In order for it to shine in the light of the sun (the divine), the water (the thoughts) must be pure and crystal clear and calm, free of waves (excitement). If our water is murky or choppy, others can’t see this jewel, our inner light . . .”

In the bottom of the lake of our thoughts is a jewel . . .

But it’s not that simple: it’s often difficult to discern the connection that unites wakefulness with sleep, between what we think ourselves to be and what our oneiric fantasies say about us. In any case, if our search is passionate and patient, constant and conscious, it will result in the discovery of our true Self. Therefore the interpretation of dreams cuts right to the heart of the message conceived by and for ourselves (although not consciously). It is important to learn to listen to them (further on we will discuss techniques for this) when it comes time to unstitch their meaning and extract the teachings that can enrich our lives.

The rooms in our dreams reflect unknown aspects of our personality.

In this way, when we have to make an important decision, we can clear up any doubts through a clear understanding of our most intimate desires. Although it may seem like common sense, this is not that common these days, since most people make decisions at random, out of habit, or by impulse.

The meaning and psychic effect of some deities in Tibetan Buddhism can be linked to the monsters that are so popular today.

Dreams allow creativity a free rein and free us from worry, sometimes resulting in surreal images that would be impossible in waking life.

Put simply, the idea is to find your true identity and recognize your wounds, fears, and joys through dreams. Never forget that the subconscious, although hidden, is an essential part of our personality. Dreams are fundamental for understanding the Self, since they are a direct path to this little-known part of ourselves. Their symbolic content allows us to recover repressed emotions and gives us a map to the relationships that surround us.

Nightmares that put us to the test

Sometimes the messages they bring us are not so pleasant and take the form of nightmares. However, although it may be hard to accept, these nightmares are valuable warnings that some aspects of our life are not in harmony with our deepest Self and thus need our prompt intervention. Nightmares are proof that self discovery is not always pleasant. Sometimes it’s necessary to feel this pain in order to find out what you really are and need. On the other hand, dreams give creativity a free rein because, when we sleep, we are free from our day-to-day worries. Therefore, even if you don’t consider yourself a creative person, keep in mind that all the scenes, symbols, and characters that appear in your dreams have been created solely and exclusively by you. It’s often very helpful to record dreams in a notebook (we will explain how further on) in order to later analyze them and apply their teachings to daily life. It is quite the paradox; the human being awakens their most intimate reality precisely when they are sleeping. Carl Gustav Jung, who dedicated his life to studying dreams, developed this metaphor: “People live in mansions of which they only know the basements.” Only when our conscience is sleeping do we manage to unveil some of the rooms of our magnificent house: rooms that may be dusty and inhospitable and fill us with terror and anxiety, or magnificent rooms where we want to stay forever. Given that they all belong to us, it is reasonable to want to discover them all. Dreams, in this sense, are a fundamental tool.

How to remember dreams

At this point, you’re probably thinking, “Sure, dreams are really important, but I can’t use them because I simply don’t remember them.” That’s not a problem, there are techniques you can use to strengthen your memory of oneiric thoughts. Techniques that, when applied correctly, allow us to remember dreams surprisingly well. The use of these methods is indispensable in most cases since people tend to forget dreams completely when they wake up. Why? Because, according to the hypothesis of Sigmund Freud, we have a sort of internal censor that tries to prevent our oneiric activity from becoming conscious material.

Sometimes the message of dreams turns unpleasant and takes the form of a nightmare . . .

However, we can laugh in the face of this censor with a few tricks. The most drastic is to wake up suddenly when the deepest sleep phase (REM phase) is just about to end, so that you can rapidly write all the details of your mind’s theater in your notebook. Waking suddenly will take this censor by surprise, stopping it from doing its job. The best time to set the alarm is for four, five, six, or a little more than seven hours after going to sleep. If your level of motivation is not high enough to get up in the middle of the night and record your dreams, there are alternatives that let you sleep for a stretch and then remember what you dream with great precision. First of all, it’s helpful to develop some habits before going to bed, such as waiting a few hours between dinner and going to sleep. Experts recommend avoiding foods that cause gas (legumes like green beans, raw vegetables, etc.) and foods high in fat. You must also keep in mind that, like tea and coffee, tobacco and alcohol alter the sleep cycle and deprive the body of a deep sleep (the damaging effects of a few glasses on the body does not disappear for about four hours). What is recommended is to drink water or juice, or eat a yogurt, more than two hours after eating, before going to bed. There are two main reasons for this: liquids facilitate a certain purification of the body, and because, most interestingly for our purposes, it causes us to get up in the middle of the night. As we said, this will catch the internal censor by surprise and allow us to record our dreams easily.

Relaxing in bed and going over the events of the day helps free the mind and foster oneiric creativity.

Yoga exercises, such as the savasana pose, are great for relaxation, restful sleep, and a positive outlook.

Relaxation

It’s important to surround yourself with an environment that stimulates oneiric activity. You should feel comfortable in your room and your bed. The fewer clothes you wear to sleep, the better. Practicing relaxation techniques, listening to calming music, or taking a warm bath a few minutes before getting into bed will help relieve stress so that you enjoy a deep restorative sleep. There are good books on relaxation on the market, both autogenous and yogic; we recommend one of the most practical, Relajacion para gente muy ocupada (Relaxation for Busy People), by Shia Green, published by this same publishing house. However, the real key is to concentrate on remembering dreams. When you go to bed, go over the events of the day that were important to you. This way, you will increase the probability of dreaming about the subjects that most interest or worry you. So, let’s suppose you’re asleep now. What should you do to remember dreams? First, try to wake up naturally, without external stimuli. If this isn’t possible, use the quietest possible alarm without radio. Once awake, stay in bed for a few moments with your eyes closed and try to hold your dreams in your memory as you gently transition into wakefulness. Take advantage of this time to memorize the images you dreamt. The final oneiric period is usually the longest and these instants are when it is most possible to remember dreams.

Remember that it’s best to write the keywords of the dream immediately upon waking. It is convenient to keep a notebook on the nightstand and reconstruct the dream during the day.

The dream notebook

Next, write in the notebook (that you have left beside your bed) whatever your mind has been able to retain, no matter how absurd or trivial your dreams seem, even if you only remember small fragments. This is not the moment to make evaluations or interpretations. The exercise is to simply record everything that crosses your mind with as much detail as possible. Giving the fragility of memory, it’s okay to start off with just a few key words that summarize the content of the dream. These words will help you reconstruct the dream later in the day if you don’t have enough time in the morning. Ideally this notebook will gradually become a diary or schedule that allows you to study, analyze, and compare a series of dreams. Through a series of recorded episodes, you can detect recurring characters, situations, or themes. This is something that’s easy to miss at first glance. One important detail: specialists recommend you date and title each dream, since this helps you remember them in later readings. It’s also interesting to complement your entries with relevant annotations: what feelings were provoked, which aspects most drew your attention, which colors predominated, etc. An outline or drawing of the most significant images can also help you unravel the meaning. Finally, you should write an initial personal interpretation of the dream. For that, the second part of this book offers some useful guidelines.

While we dream, there is a sort of safety mechanism that inhibits our movement. Therefore, sleepwalkers don’t walk during the REM phase. This protects us from acting out the movements of our dreams and possibly hurting ourselves. Still from the Spanish movie Carne de fieras (Flesh of beasts) (1936).

As we’ve seen, there are a series of techniques to remember dreams. This is the first step to extracting their wisdom. Now, given that oneiric thoughts are a source of inspiration for solving problems, wouldn’t it be great to choose what you dream about before you go to sleep? Rather than waiting for dreams to come to us spontaneously, try to make them focus on the aspects of your life that interest you.

How to determine the theme of dreams

Let’s imagine that someone is not very satisfied with their job. They’d like to get into another line of work but are afraid of losing the job security they enjoy. On one hand, they’re not so young anymore, they should take the risk to get what they really want. But they don’t know what to do. They need a light, a sign, an inspiration. In short, they need a dream. But not just any dream, a dream that really centers on their problem and gives answers. However, if you limit yourself to just “consulting your pillow,” you won’t get the desired results. There is a possibility you will be lucky and dream about what you’re interested in, but more likely you will dream of anything but. If we are really prepared to dive into that which worries us most intimately, we can direct our dreams to give us concrete answers. Just like the techniques to remember dreams, the process is simple: before sleeping, we must concentrate on the subject of interest. It’s also best to write in your notebook all the events and emotions of the day that were most important before you go to sleep. Once your impressions and theme to dream have been noted, concentrate on the subject that most bothers you. Think about it carefully; propose questions and alternatives, “listen” to your own emotions. It’s best if all possible doubts are noted in the dream notebook. This way you’re more likely to receive an answer. In order for it to be an effective answer, the question must be well defined. The fundamental idea of the problem should be summed up in a single phrase. Once you’ve reflected on the problem, it’s time to go to bed. But the “homework” is not finished yet. Before going to sleep, you need to concentrate on the concrete question. You need to forget everything else, even the details. Just “visualize” and repeat the question, without thinking of anything else, until you fall asleep.

Oneiric thoughts are a source of inspiration. Annotating and analyzing them carefully fosters a process of self discovery.


Writing a dream notebook

You should always have a notebook and pen near your bed to write down dreams the moment you wake up. Don’t forget to always write the date. What details should you include in this kind of diary? As many as you remember, the more the better.
  • Note the events of the dream in order. It may not seem important when they appear unrelated. However, when analyzing them you can establish a chronological relationship between distinct elements.
  • What characters appear in your dreams? Was someone important missing? If one of them reminded you of someone you know, note that. Don’t rely on your memory.
  • If a familiar sight appears, analyze the differences between the dream and the real world. Were the doors/windows in the same place? Were they the same size and color? And so on. This is especially important if you want to practice lucid dreaming.
  • Also note the differences between familiar people in dreams and how
  • Also note the differences between familiar people in dreams and how they are in real life.
  • List the non-human characters that appeared, as well as any objects that behaved as if animated.
  • Take special note of recurrent themes, scenes, or characters. Do they always act/happen the same way?
  • Write down all the colors you remember.
  • Note your emotional reactions: if you feel happy, scared, nervous . . . Don’t let any theories about the meaning of dreams interfere. You run the risk of skipping details that might be very significant.
  • Finally, don’t trust your memory. After a time, you won’t remember a thing about some of the dreams you wrote down. No matter how clear they are in the moment, write them down.

Dreams are “signs,” messages from our subconscious, and the study and interpretation of them helps resolve the problems that worry us.

Nocturnal sleep puts us in touch with the deepest level of being, which allows us to approach our problems with a wider perspective. And induced dreams tend to be easier to remember than other oneiric activity.

When we dream, we enter a marvelous world that escapes the laws of spatial and temporal logic.

... Dreampedia

Dreampedia

“The interpretation of dreams is the real path to knowing the soul.” SIGMUND FREUD

Clear and personalized messages

Before jumping in to discover the hidden messages that filter into our dreams and appear in the dictionary in the second part, it’s best to keep in mind that not all oneiric thoughts can be analyzed with the same pattern. Therefore, psychologists and analysts distinguish between three classes of dreams:
  • Readjustment dreams
  • Satisfaction dreams
  • Premonitory dreams
In the interpretation of dreams, we work from the base knowledge that the same subject can have very different meanings depending on the circumstances and personal situation of the dreamer. Because of this, this dictionary offers abundant explanations (psychological and esoteric) from very distinct viewpoints, although the boundary is often blurred. This is meant to show the melting pot of possibilities for discovery and prediction if one atunes their sensitivity and perceptiveness in each interpretation. But back to this chapter, where we have compiled a series of recurring themes as examples, and touch on erotic dreams, another way in which the subconscious offers information to be analyzed. Although these belong in the group of satisfaction dreams, their details warrant a separate explanation.

Readjustment dreams

In this type of dream, the oneiric images are provoked by merely physical causes. Readjustment dreams can be of internal origins—that is, generated by the body due to factors such as indigestion or a headache—or of external origin—heat, noises, the feel of sheets on the body, etc. A typical example of a readjustment dream with external origin would be that of a person who, due to the weight of the blankets, dreams of carrying a heavy load. Where do these types of images come from? It’s simple: when we close our eyes, we have the sensation of being isolated from the world because our consciousness of the exterior world is so linked to visual perception. However, the other senses remain in contact with the world. Therefore, even though when we sleep we appear to lose consciousness, this information continues to be collected in the brain (this is why loud noises wake us up). This is why we prefer darkness and quiet to sleep. However, we can’t always control our surroundings. When situations arise out of our control (the sound of a siren, a change in temperature, etc.), these sensory impressions become integrated in our dreams and can take surprising forms.
Abraham Lincoln, president of the United States, dreamt of his own death by assassination.

Premonitory dreams


These oneiric episodes dream of something that will become reality in the future. In the majority of cases, these are negative dreams that tend to warn of a coming danger. As a paradigmatic example of premonition, take that of Abraham Lincoln, president of the United States, in 1865. A few days before being assassinated, Lincoln saw his own death in one of his dreams. Even though this mythical case of the US president indicates the opposite, let us be clear that dreaming of a death does not necessarily imply that a tragic event is imminent.

In these dreams, death can mean many different things; for example, some psychologists interpret it as marking the end of a life cycle. This is why we insist on the importance of personalizing the dream interpretation.

Be that as it may, premonitions tend to be hidden in a symbolism that is difficult to decode, since it does not refer to past experiences. They are messages that try to warn us of dangers that face us on the physical or emotional plane. For this reason, eastern cultures have always valued them highly, as we will see later on.

Satisfaction dreams

Satisfaction dreams constitute the basis for the main theories of oneiric interpretation. They deal with those images in which we fulfill the desires that we cannot satisfy while awake. Therefore, this huge category includes everything from erotic dreams to the worst nightmares. In some cases, a certain satisfaction dream may repeat for years. This means that the person’s subconscious is warning them of the importance of something they may be trying to ignore. The part of this book dedicated to interpretation refers to this type of dreams.

Sexual dreams are not necessarily the result of accumulated sexual tension that needs to be released, but rather they usually refer to inner conflicts and hidden needs, or a desire to enjoy sex more freely.

Sexual dreams

There are dreams that have the capacity to excite us, intrigue us, make us tremble, embarrass us . . . These are the ones that we never, or almost never, share with others. These are erotic dreams that, generally speaking, have nothing to do with the social or sexual conduct of our waking lives.

“Dreams manifest the desires that our consciousness does not express.” Sigmund Freud

Erotic dreams join other sensations that, in waking life, we probably wouldn’t relate immediately with sex. Therefore, these dreams, which could be violent, passionate, perverse, romantic, etc., tend to refer to inner conflicts and hidden emotional needs. Therefore they belong to the classification of satisfaction dreams.

On some occasions, they reveal a fear of intimacy or warn against certain relationships. In others, they illustrate situations and behaviors that we cannot normally exhibit. The dream represents everything through symbols or a strong sexual connotation. Its themes and languages, often dark, can confuse us or make us doubt because each individual has their personal symbols (just like with other types of dreams). It’s interpretation, therefore, should be performed according to the situation of the individual.

Dreams are escape routes for sexual impulses that social conventions repress; in erotic dreams everything seems permissible, so they are the best way to bring our most secret emotional desires to light. For Sigmund Freud, dreams manifested the desires that our consciousness does not express, and that was all.

Dreams contain valuable information about ourselves. But their meaning is often far from what it seems.

On occasion, erotic dreams illustrate situations and behaviors that we can’t experience in real life, whether it is due to social convention or our own beliefs. These sexual dreams act as an escape route for repressed impulses.
Therefore, it’s important to pay attention to them because they contain valuable information about ourselves. However, their meaning is often far from what it seems. They may just as well symbolize tension in our daily lives as the desire to have a good time.

Erotic dreams and fantasies

Erotic dreams are also related to a person’s physical and emotional development. During puberty, for example, these kinds of dreams are very common. Others that are more unpleasant are related to episodes of abuse or sexual assault. In some form or another, almost everyone has had some type of erotic dreams because at the end of the day, they are natural occurrences that are part of our lives.

They deserve our time and attention. For example, it’s important to discover when they refer to sexual issues and when they refer to other aspects, because erotic dreams often bring us valuable clues about intimacy with a partner. If something is not right in the relationship, they probably indicate the path to resolution. There should not be any difference between the erotic dreams of men and women, just between different people. However, various studies done in the United States have demonstrated the opposite. While women usually have erotic dreams with someone they know and go all the way from flirting to coitus, men dream of anonymous kinky women that succumb to their fantasies. Obviously this is not always the case, but it is undeniable that a personal relationship is highly valued in the feminine psyche. The masculine, on the other hand, opts for pleasure and domination.

The education one has received, the latent sexism of the collective subconscious, and that of the media are all factors that dreams cannot bypass. These dreams can provoke even decisive, strong women to feel more vulnerable during dreams. Fortunately, as our customs are changing, the dissimilarities between masculine and feminine erotic dreams are gradually shrinking.

Finally, erotic dreams, like all dreams, can hide fears, anxieties, and needs that you repress due to inhibitive situations or a lack of time to face the problem. With the interpretation of erotic dreams, we can find many clues to understand our emotions better.

While men dream of anonymous kinky women succumbing to their fantasies, women usually dream of erotic encounters with men they know.

Dreams of duality: masculine-feminine


Dreams of duality are those that refer to our double identity: masculine and feminine. These dreams translate the union of our two elements: animus and anima, two notions defined by Jung that appear constantly in dreams. The majority of these oneiric episodes are characterized by the denial or rejection of one of the two parts of our being—and what each one represents—creating a tension or internal conflict that can even show through in our personality. In order to help us regain balance, the dream tries to make us understand how and why we’ve forgotten the other side of ourselves.

In this way, when a man dreams that he is a woman, the message is not necessarily about a conflict of identity or sexuality; more likely it refers to a lack of attention to the more sensitive, intuitive side of his personality. Equally, when a woman sees herself as a man in her dreams, her subconscious may be appealing to her more energetic and rational side.

Dreams in which the left (feminine) or right (masculine) side of our bodies are hurt or immobilized (for example, an arm or leg) warn us that we are repressing or denying our masculine or feminine development. It is difficult for us to accept our duality and we reject this aspect that we don’t know how to express.

Dreams of houses


The great oneirologist of ancient times, Artemidorus of Ephesus (second century BC) said: “The home is us”; and the most recent research on oneiric content confirms it. Buildings in our dreams are a reflection of our personality. Therefore you must pay attention to all the details that appear, which give you reliable hints about your desires, fears, worries . . . Each place and element of the house refers to a personal aspect of the self; the kitchen represents our spiritual or intellectual appetite; the oven is the alchemic place of transformation; the basement represents the accumulation of riches; the bedroom, conjugal difficulties, etc.

However, dreams in which different rooms appear can also refer to different areas of real life. If, for example, you find yourself cooking in a kitchen, it may be a reference to a plan that you are “cooking up” in real life. If you find yourself locked in a dark basement, perhaps you feel guilty about something and think you deserve a punishment. Lying in a bed or on a sofa can be a sign that you need a break from your exhausting daily routine.

When the doors of the dream house are shut tight or covered with brick, or there are signs on doors to the rooms prohibiting entry, you should ask yourself what is blocking your evolution in real life. It may be part of your own personality or some basic inhibition.

The buildings in our dreams are a reflection of our personality. “The Splash” (David Hockney, 1966).
Many people dream that they discover new rooms in houses that they know well. In general, this points to unknown aspects of their personality that are about to come out; but it can also indicate that they are ready for a new intellectual challenge.

The feelings that emerge when we find ourselves inside an oneiric building are very significant. If you feel brave and curious while exploring every nook and cranny of the house, it means that you are not afraid of what you may discover about yourself, you act assuredly, and face your problems with confidence. On the other hand, if you feel afraid it is a sign of inhibition and insecurity.

A pleasant, organized room reflects mental order and spiritual serenity. If it doesn’t have windows, it is a sign of isolation, fear, and insecurity. “La habitacion” (“The Room”) (Van Gogh, 1889).

Nightmares and anxious dreams

Nightmares are terrifying dreams that usually stay in our minds when we wake up. They usually occur during the REM phase and, on occasion, are so distressing that they wake you up and torment you for a few minutes. The fear is often accompanied by cold sweats, dry mouth, heart palpitations . . . and the sensation of having lived a terrible moment.

Sometimes, traumatic events that happen to us in waking life (an accident, a robbery, a sexual assault) revisit us in dreams. Our mind needs to free the tension caused by the event and it does it while our consciousness rests.

Worry dreams reflect subconscious doubts and fears about events in our lives that have been saved in our minds but not our conscious memory.
These dreams typically disappear with time. If they persist, it may be a major trauma that requires professional help or, at least, and understanding friend to listen; talking about it is the first step to overcoming it.

Many cultures share the belief that nightmares are nothing more than malignant spirits that attack their victims in their sleep with terrifying thoughts. Some research on oneiric content concludes that these scary dreams are more common in childhood, and if they persist into adulthood it usually indicates a deeply rooted problem.

Research in sleep laboratories has demonstrated that often nightmares are triggered by a sudden noise, which detonates a distressing oneiric image. Therefore, for people who suffer from frequent nightmares, it is advisable to wear earplugs.

Worry dreams


Dreams in which we feel worried about something are more frequent than nightmares, and sometimes the pressure we feel to resolve a problem in the dream wakes us up. Once awake, the oneiric worry may seem trivial compared to our real problems, however we should not ignore the importance of these dreams; their analysis will reveal areas of our lives that require attention or make us insecure.

Worry dreams reflect subconscious doubts and fears about events in our lives that have been saved in our minds but not our conscious memory. They deal with minor preoccupations that we haven’t consciously given attention to, but our subconscious has recognized.

According to Freud, dreams that generate anxiety or worry are the result of trying to repress an emotion or desire, usually sexual. Freud also highlighted the importance of finding the source of that worry in waking life, since these worries left unattended can degenerate into worse traumas.

To analyze this type of dream you must pay attention to all the elements that appear in the episode, since it is symbolically giving you hints about what worries us.

Dreams about angels are usually messages of inner exploration. In some oneiric episodes they appear as spiritual guides and protectors that try to show us a path.

Dreams of inner exploration: forgotten babies and angels


Dreams in which forgotten babies or angels appear are very common, and meaningful for our personal and spiritual evolution. But what is the meaning of this baby that screams to be held and fed? It represents, symbolically, the spiritual seed inside of us that has been left to languish without nourishment. This sacred seed, the divine Self, the “philosophical child,” as the alchemists said. It has trusted us and we must help it grow.

Dreams about angels or spiritual entities tend to be messages of inner exploration. We see various examples collected in an “office of dreams.”

“I am in utter darkness. I am surrounded by silence and emptiness. Suddenly, a shape appears, white and slender, pure, almost surreal. The features of the face are erased. A pure oval, the svelte body, without a definable sex. There is only the impression of extreme sweetness and deep harmony; but this character causes me such an impression of abandonment that it seems like a cry for help. I wrap it in my arms and want to save it at all costs.”

This is a dream of protections, of contact with the invisible world. In this oneiric episode, the androgynous character is recognized as angelic. This fabulous vision is none other than the person’s angel showing him his ailment, found in the darkness.

In other dreams, angels appear as spiritual guides or personal guardians:

The cartoons of “Little Nemo” (Winsor McCay, 1905) always ended with the images of Nemo falling out of bed. His incredible stories revolved around his fascinating dreams.

“I had died on a golden carriage decorated with blue velvet; to my right, a feminine angel, all white, smiled at me . . . she held before me the reins of two white horses, while ahead of us, an unending path bathed in sunlight opened to us.”

Travel dreams


One of the most pleasant and stimulating oneiric experiences is traveling to a far-off place and waking up with the sensation of having returned from a great vacation. Without a doubt, this often means a deep desire to travel that you have not been able to satisfy; but it can also hold other interesting readings.

On occasion, you remember precise details about places and settings you have never been to. This could be due to photographs, movies, or television reports that you’ve seen and that your subconscious has saved for some special reason.

These journeys coincide, sometimes, with moment in real life when we are about to begin something new (a change of job or location . . .). Just as the landscape and feelings of the dream can indicate our real emotions about this change, the circumstances of the trip are also revealing. If it is a bumpy trip in which it is difficult to get to your destination (because you lost the tickets or bags, or crashed the car . . .), the dream may be encouraging you to weigh the pros and cons of the situation, and warning you about obstacles ahead. Perhaps you are not mentally prepared for the change.

On the other hand, dreams about remote and exotic places are warning you that your lifestyle is claustrophobic and repressed, and that you need a change or to broaden your horizons.

The mode of transportation that you use to travel in the dream is very significant. If you travel in plane, for example, you should ask yourself if you have your feet firmly on the ground or, on the contrary, if you feel more comfortable “in the clouds.” Escapism in real life tends to appear symbolically in travel dreams. Trains are symbols of new and exciting opportunities; missing the train or letting it leave is a clear symbol of a fear of change—and the insecurity that goes along with this. The station, or point of departure, is a symbolic place of transformation. The predicament of not having a ticket or money to buy one is related to some type of deficiency. However, if you manage to arrive at the destination despite it all, the dream is reflecting a certain amount of self satisfaction.

Surrealism was a revolution. The world of the oneiric, the subconscious, the paranoid . . . become a new way of seeing and exploring life. Its influence is still seen today.

... Dreampedia

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