The meaning of Prone in dream | Dream interpretation


Relaxation; letting go of activity; introversion; sex. Or retreat from the world; feeling injured, afraid to stand up for oneself, non-involvement, negative introversion, weakness; death. Idioms: lie low; lie at one’s door, lie in wait; take it lying down. See squatting down; standing, both in this entry.

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences | Tony Crisp


Prone | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Prone

RACCOON

A rascally individual, one prone to foolish behavior ... Christian Dream Symbols

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Christian Dream Symbols

ANIMUS

The male within the female, shown as a man in a woman’s dreams. Physically a woman is predominantly fe­male, but also has a clitoris and produces some male hor­mones. Psychologically, we may only express part of our po­tential in everyday life. In a woman, the more physically dynamic, intellectual and socially challenging side of herself may be given less expression. Apart from this, some features, such as innovation and creative rational thought, may be held in latency. These secondary or latent characteristics are de­picted by the male in female dreams. In general we can say the man represents the woman’s mental and social power, her ability to act creatively in ‘the world’. It also holds in it an expression of her complex of feelings about men, gained as experience mostly from her relationship with—or lack of— father, but also from a synthesis of all her male contacts. So the whole realm of her expenence of the male can be repre­sented by the man in her dream, and is accessible through the image.

Good relationship with or marrying the man: shows the woman integrating her own ability to be independent and capable in outwardly active terms. This makes her more whole, balancing her ‘female’ qualities. It also shows the woman meeting her experience of her father in a healing way. This enables the woman to have a realistic relationship with an actual man. It also bnngs a sense of connectedness be­tween her conscious self and what she senses as the ‘commer­cial’ world. See father in this entry.

To be in conflict with the man, or unable to make real physical and pleasurable contact with him: suggests difficulty in meeting what may have been a painful or threatening expe­rience of father. This can lead to lack of ability to make clear judgments, and lack of decisiveness in areas outside feeling values. She is prone to acceptance of collective or long held social norms without question; family or national attitudes not applicable to present situations; and reasoning’ which actu­ally arises out of emotions connected to such family or social norms. Actual relations with men will be difficult, or entered into simply as a duty. Emotional or intimate merging with a man is threatening because it brings the woman close to the conflicts and pain connected with father. Sex may be possible but not a close feeling union. See man.

Christ Although people generally think of Christ as a histori­cal figure, in dreams Christ is not this at all. He is a powerful process in the human unconscious. In the west we give this process the name of Christ, but the process or archetype is universal and has various names in different cultures. Some­times represented in dreams as a fish or a big man, in general the Christ is an expression of the dreamer’s own potential— what they can become in their life. But it also depicts what might be called a sense of the forces of symbiosis or co­operative activity operative in human life and the cosmos. There are at least four aspects to Chrisi as depicted in dreams.

The Sunday school or Church Christ: depicts social norms, the generally accepted morals and social rules. This Christ’ comes about because the Church tends to represent tradi­tional values, and also the attempt to press people to live these values.

The dreamer may have a childlike relationship with this Christ or, if attempting to be self responsible, be in con­flict with it. Some people find this Christ has a castrating role in their life, and flee in horror. In fact this aspect of social indoctrination may lead to such a burden of guilt and sup­pression that it can create psychic cripples. Trying to do all the right’ things may lead us to the point where ‘we can’t say no to a glass of water without a pang of guilt*. Two of the great forces which push at the human soul or psyche are social pressure, such as the moral norm, and biological pressures, such as the sex drive, individuals may fight a lifelong battle with one or the other of these.

The social cnminal typifies battle with the first; the ascetic, battle with the second.

The ideal Christ: the psychological process which causes us not to take responsibility for our own highest ideals; our own yearnings for the good, our own most powerful urges arising against what we see as evils in the world. This influ­ences us to wait for a sign from Christ in our dream in order to gain authority, or to overcome the anxiety associated with the drive. We want God to say we should act in a cenain way because we are not willing to be self responsible. Example: I stood outside a castle. It was closed and guarded by soldiers in armour. Wondering how to get in I thought that if I dressed and acted as a soldier I would be allowed entrance. It worked and inside Christ met me and said he had important work for me to do’ (Sonia).

The closely guarded secret is Soma’s own impulse to do some son of socially creative work. She doesn’t want to acknowledge the impulse as her own; it is much easier if she can say ‘Christ told me to do this’. In this way she avoids direct encounter with opposition.

The unofficial Chnst. Example: A fierce battle was raging with bullets flying. I immediately fell down and played “dead”. It wasn’t that I was hurt in any way, but I didn’t want to be at any risk in the fight. As I lay there, I saw a tall well built man in soldier’s uniform walk to me. He gave no sign of any fear concerning the bullets, and quietly knelt beside me. I felt he was Christ, but was confused by him being a soldier. He placed a hand on my back and gradually worked his fin­gers under the shell of a large limpet type creature that I had never before known was parasitically attached to my back. I could feel him pull it away, but knew its tentacles still ran right into my chest. He then sat me up and told me how I could rid myself of the tentacles and so be healed’ (Peter Y).

Peter had a debilitating psychosomatic illness at the time of the dream, causing pain where the tentacles ran.

The shell is his defence against feeling his own hurts and inner conflicts.

The dream shows him contacting a strength which is not afraid of his internal battlefield of conflicts, and can show ways of healing real human problems.

The healing rests upon the dreamer’s conscious action, not Christ’s, suggesting the dreamer taking responsibility for his own situation. Peter real­ised he had been avoiding his own internal battlefield, but felt he had met a strength which would support his efforts to find healing. In fact he met his conflicts and grew beyond his ailments. Peter’s conflicts were between his love for his chil­dren and his sexuality. This Christ is our undammed life; the flood of loving sexuality; the strength to burst through social rules and regulations because love of life pushes us. It doesn’t give a hang about bullets, death, nght or wrong, because it has a sense of its own integral existence within life, and its own lightness and place in eternity.

The integral or cosmic Christ. Example: ‘I am a journalist reponing on the return of Christ. He is expected on a paddle steamer going upstream on a large river. I am very sceptical and watch disciples and followers gather on the rear deck.

The guru arrives, dressed in simple white robes. He has long, beautiful auburn hair and beard, and a gentle wise face. He begins to tap a simple rhythm on a tabla or Indian drum. It develops into complex intermingling of orchestral rhythms as everyone joins in. I now realise he is Christ, and feel over­whelmed with awe as I try to play my part in the music. I’m tapping with a pen and find myself fumbling.

A bottle or can opener comes to me from the direction of Christ. I try to beat a complementary rhythm, a small pan of a greater, universal music’ (Lester S).

Each of us has a sense of connectedness with the whole, with the cosmos. We may be little aware of this sense, our scepticism may deny it, as Lester’s was doing. But finding it can enrich the rest of our nature.

The sense bnngs with it a realisation of taking part in the unimaginably grand drama called life. It gives a feeling, no matter what the state of our body, crippled or healthy, that we have something that makes any faults in body or achievement insignificant. It doesn’t take all the difficulties out of life, but it is a good companion on the way. In dreams and religion Christ is also represented as the son of the Cosmos or God. This aspect of Christ is cosmic, from beyond the Earth. This is a process in the cosmos which the unconscious senses and presents under the image of Christ, or other figures in different religions.

It is possible that there is an innate process in human beings to do with love and symbiosis which humanity became aware of at a particu­lar stage in the development of consciousness. This becoming aware was expressed in what we know as the histoncal Jesus. See religion and dreams; the self within this entry. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

PREMENSTRUAL TENSION

Dr Ernest Hartmann carried out studies in connection with people who have stable sleep pat­terns. His aim was to define whether waking events influ­enced people’s need for sleep.

For instance, a loss of boy­friend or stress caused many young women to have an increased need for sleep. Some people who had undergone successful psychotherapy for their emotional difficulties, and some meditators, found their sleep need was decreased.

Wanting to know more about why these situations changed sleep need, Hartmann went on to study dream sleep in a group of women who suffered premenstrual tension (PMT). This group were prone to depression and irritability during PMT—records show there is an unusually high rate of mur­der, suicide and admission to psychiatric hospitals during this time. Although Hartmann found this group needed a little more sleep time than a control group, the main feature of change was their increased need for dreaming. Their length of time spent in dreaming increased in relationship to their de­pression.

The conclusion reached was that one of the func­tions of dreaming is to help deal with difficult states of emo­tion or anxiety. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

SQUATTING DOWN

The down expresses sleep; rest; withdrawal; non-involvement. Idioms: feel down, down and out; do some­one down, down at heel; down hearted; down with. See prone above in this entry. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

STORYTELLERS

(see Books, Fables)

The preservation of history, culture, religion, or central truths. Among many civilizations, this person equated to the medieval bard, or Hebrew cantor, who by their talents kept an oral legacy for a specific group alive. In interpreting such a dream, consider what story is told, bv and to whom, and how it is received for more meaning.

For example, the rejection of a Bible story from your youth in a dream might likewise symbolize your personal rejection of that idea or belief system.

Morals or lessons from the subconscious or Higher Self, neatly disguised in a more enjoyable construct. Storytelling has always been an effective teaching tool because it draws our attention away from the chore to something we perceive as fun.

Potentially, a personal creation that should find its way into a tape or book, if only for your own enjoyment. Inventive energies are much more fluid when we sleep, and many excellent artists have received inspiration for a story, song, or painting this way.

Religious stories denote a change in perspectives from mundane to more devout matters, whereas hearing things like fables reveals a romantic nature prone to daydreaming.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

GIFT

Vision: Receiving a gift: be prepared to face some losses. Open your heart to others. Giving a gift: you are prone to hasty actions and decisions. Also, someone will surprise you with a gift.

Depth Psychology: Dreaming about giving a gift or giving something away is a reminder to be more generous with your affection toward others. Or did you “give yourself away”? Maybe you have become so involved in a particular matter that you neglected your own interests? You are either an idealist or have too many illusions. You will know which of the above fits you! Sometimes a gift refers to your need for recognition and praise; or it is simply a sign of a positive state of mind. Who is giving the gift? To whom are you giving a gift? Did you give yourself a gift?... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

JEWELRY

Vision: Wearing jewelry: don’t be vain and arrogant—it does not make for good friends. Seeing other people wearing jewelry’: you are easily taken in by others and are prone to misjudge them. See Precious Stones.

Depth Psychology: Are you “decorating” yourself to gain attention or admiration? Giving jewelry as a gift to someone: is jewelry an indication of the “precious” feelings you have for someone? Receiving jewelry as a gift: does someone have “precious feelings” for you?... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

PULPIT

Symbol: The pulpit is a preacher s special place.

Vision: Seeing a pulpit or standing in one: you will appear in public and give a speech, or people are attacking you and you have to defend yourself. Standing in a pulpit also means that you want to influence and instruct others.

Depth Psychology: You are either prone to be a know-it-all who, with your “teachings,” gains power over others, or you are suffering because of a person with these character traits. Your motto should be: “Everybody is entitled to his own opinions—no matter how wrong they are.” Follow that advice or face lots of conflict.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

SQUIRREL

Vision: Seeing a squirrel: single people will get married soon; married people will have children. Seeing a dead squirrel: a relative will come down with an illness. Watching a squirrel eating: a symbol of a happy, quiet family life. Being bitten by a squirrel: a problem-prone family member is giving reasons for worry. Watching a squirrel “squirrel away’ food: you, too, should prepare soon for “lean” times.

Depth Psychology: Usually this animal is a symbol of your private life— marriage, pregnancy, or family life in general—(depending on the rest of the dream). Since the squirrel is a master in providing for the future, the dream might encourage you to do likewise!... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

LIE / LYING

Psychological / emotional perspective: We can become conscious of deliberate falsehood in dreams when our emotions are called into question and we are not true to our principles.

To be lying prone suggests that we should adopt a different perspective.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

EARTHQUAKES

If you live in an area prone to earthquakes and are used to them, this dream indicates minor difficulties that need to be resolved. But if you live in a place where earthquakes are rare, this dream implies a sudden and totally unexpected change in your circumstances - which could require some difficult adjustments at first, but will, in the long run, end in success and good fortune.... Dream Explanations of Astro Center

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Dream Explanations of Astro Center

ADDRESS BOOK

If you see or use an address book in your dream, this is a lucky time for flirting with someone who catches your eye! To see a specific phone number in your dream may suggest that you need to make contact with someone and reach out for help.

If you couldn’t find something in your address book, you need to start being more independent and responsible.

If you wrote a new address or phone number in it, be careful with money - you will be prone to losing it on bad investments and unsatisfying purchases for the next little while.

If the address book in your dream belonged to somebody else, this is a warning to be more discreet in confiding your personal affairs to others.... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

HEIMLICH MANEUVER

If you dreamed of choking and being given the Heimlich Maneuver by someone, avoid all unnecessary risks as you are likely to be in an accident-prone phase for a few weeks.

If your dream involved you giving the Heimlich Maneuver to somebody else, or someone else besides you getting it, this signifies sudden success in overcoming a previously challenging obstacle.... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

OSTEOPATH

To dream of an osteopath or of osteopathic treatment is a warning that you are in an accident- prone phase and should be extra cautious for the next few weeks.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

RESCUE

Avoid all unnecessary risks as you are likely to be in an accident-prone phase for a few weeks following a dream of being rescued; but if your dream involved rescuing someone else, or others being rescued, it signifies sudden success in overcoming a previously sticky obstacle.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

ACCIDENT

The accident may be a car crash, a careless dropping of a brick on someone’s head, or just slipping on a banana skin. Whatever it is, you have to ask who is the victim of the accident and (where applicable) who caused it? Usually it will be you, or some aspect of you.

(1) If the accident in the dream involves only you - if, for example, it is a repeat of some accident diat actually happened to you - then ask yourself: am I accident prone? If you are, the dream may be expressing your worries about this accident proneness. It may also be asking you to do something about it.

Accidents are often less accidental than we think.

If there were no unconscious dimension to the human psyche, then we would be justified in speaking of ‘pure accidents’ - unless we subscribe to the notion of some implacable God or fate that causes them. But if we accept the existence of unconscious drives, unconscious desires and motivations, then what otherwise we might properly call accidents may be seen as misfortunes we have brought upon ourselves. We may, at an unconscious level, be playing the martyr or punishing ourselves for imagined guilt. Docs any of this apply to you? If so, try to discover - ask your unconscious to reveal - the cause of your neurotic selfpunishment. The cause will almost certainly turn out to be not so much a fact as a fantasy, and any factual element in it will almost certainly be quite innocuous and innocent. If, for instance, you concluded that the cause of your guilt-feelings and consequent masochism was connected with your father’s death, was it really you who killed him? Or if you think the cause is a childhood sexual desire for your mother or father, isn’t that a natural part of human development, and therefore blameless?

(2) If the dream strikes you powerfully as a premonition, act accordingly. Avoid whatever action might expose you to an accident of the kind depicted in the dream.

(3) If the accident happens to someone else in your dream, you have to decide who that person is or, alternatively, what part of yourself is represented by that person.

If the victim is identifiable as someone in real life, then, no matter how close the person is to you and no matter how much you love that person, you should consider the possibility that the dream is expressing an unconscious hostile wish or resentment towards that person. Even if the dream makes you anxious for the safety or well-being of the person, it may be that the anxiety is a cloak for repressed antagonism towards him or her. Feelings and desires arc repressed because they are felt to be unacceptable. But, however disgusting or morally reprehensible those feelings or desires may appear to you, it is better to face up to them in the clear light of consciousness than to leave them to brood and breed in the dark cellars of the unconscious. What is repressed does not cease to exist (what is out of sight is not out of mind!); nor does it cease to function negatively and destructively.

Siblings, as well as parents and spouse, are likely objects of jealousy and even of uncharitable death-wishes. For siblings, see also Brother / Sister; for parents, see also Father, Mother.

(4) Dream accidents of a rather different kind may be mere reviewings of actual happenings: forgetting your spouse’s / parent’s / sibling’s birthday, or failing to do in a certain situation what you normally do in that situation (e.g. complimenting a person on his or her looks or performance). What may appear to be accidental may, in fact, be the effect of an unconscious cause (see (1) above), and the dream’s repetition of the ‘absentmindedness’ or ‘inexplicable lapse of memory* may, in fact, be a prompting from your unconscious to get some inner conflict sorted out.

On the other hand, such dreams may be pure anxiety dreams, representing your fear of making such a slip. Remember, though, that anxiety can cloak unconscious anger, and it is anxiety that causes repression. (Freud began by saying that repression causes anxiety; but he later reversed that formula.) See also Anxiety.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

ANIMAL(S)

(see also entries for particular animals; e.g. Bear, Cat)

(1) Parents may appear in dreams in the guise of animals. The animal will then usually be a focus for the dreamer’s ambivalent - love-hate - feelings towards the parent. For example, a spider or a cat may signify the threatening aspect of a mother from whose influence you need to liberate yourself.

Two of Freud’s most famous patients had animal phobias, as did a patient of Sandor Ferenczi (a member of Freud’s inner circle). One dreamed of white wolves in the branches of a walnut tree outside his bedroom window and the other had strong ambivalent feelings (fear and attraction) towards horses; the third was obsessed with poultry. Freud concluded that in all three cases the animals were father surrogates: in each case the person’s feelings for his father had been displaced on to animals.

(2) Animals may represent other people, besides parents. What you associate with the particular animal - slyness or aggressiveness or whatever — may be a characteristic of the particular person; the way you react to the animal in the dream may express your (perhaps unconscious) feelings towards the person.

(3) Animals in dreams may be symbolic of some primitive - ‘animal’, or even ‘beasdy5 - part of your psyche: some instinctive urge, for example. Thus, if in the dream your emotional response to the animal is one of fear, this would seem to indicate a fear of the instinctive urge (which, because of the fear, has been repressed).

If the animal has a threatening appearance, it may be a symbol of the danger that threatens the peace of the psyche when some part of it is neglected and confined to the ‘cellar’ - the depths of the unconscious - and not allowed proper expression at the conscious level. This situation may also be symbolized by the figure of a caged or wounded animal: we sometimes control our instincts too tightly or even maltreat them, and, just as animals are never more fierce or dangerous than when wounded, so it is with our Svounded’ instincts.

A view well worth considering is that we cannot - without detriment to ourselves - dispense with our animal nature, any more than with our ‘higher’ or ‘spiritual’ nature. The way to achieve peace and happiness is to allow both these sides of our nature to develop and find fulfilment in and through each other, in a symbiosis in which body and spirit, instead of going their separate ways, cooperate with mutual respect, each supplying means for the other’s fulfilment.

(4) A threatening or ferocious animal may represent aggression or anger buried in the unconscious.

If you think this may be so in your case (perhaps because you are prone to irrational, disproportionate outbursts of rage), look for the origins of the aggression. It may go back to early childhood: a child’s desire for a parent and its consequent jealousy and resentment towards the other parent may result in feelings of guilt, which in turn give rise to a desire to punish oneself. This aggressiveness directed against oneself (i.e. masochism) may then spill over into aggressiveness or rancour towards other people (i.e. sadism), especially loved ones or people closely related. Typically, an unresolved Oedipus complex (the ambivalent, love-hate feelings of an infant towards a parent) may display itself in later life in a similar ambivalence towards a spouse - an inability to love someone without simultaneously wanting to punish him or her.

Contradictory feelings towards others are a sign of inner conflict, usually a conflict between desire and conscience. And what we call conscience may be a morbid censoring and prohibiting mechanism set in motion by a childhood fear of punishment. This needs to be distinguished from a healthy conscience, which consists of all those moral guidelines we give ourselves by rational reflection. Some compromise between desires and the need to survive and succeed socially is almost inevitable; but a reasonably negotiated compromise is far preferable to the potentially dangerous inner tension that results from submitting to irrational phobias posing as the moral law.

(5) A tamed animal, or the act of taming an animal, may symbolize (the need for) that kind of controlled expression of instinct that is appropriate for living as a part of civilized society or for feeling that you are ‘king of the castle’ - that is, in control of your own actions.

(6) The wolf in the Little Red Riding Hood story exemplifies another piece of animal symbolism. The wolf here represents for a sexually inexperienced woman the terrifying aspect of the male, the fear of sexual contact. In its earliest versions the story possibly served as a warning to young girls against socially premature sexual relations with men. Animals in dreams may certainly have a sexual meaning and the wolf is an obvious example of this, if only because the word Volf is itself commonly applied to men whose sexual lust is unbounded and purely ‘animal’. See also Frog, Wolf.

(7) If in your dream you arc being chased by an animal, the animal probably represents some (repressed) emotion or instinct. As long as you keep such things buried in your unconscious thev will continue to

plague and disturb you. Face up to whatever it is, and enter into receptive and patient dialogue with it.

(8) The killing of an animal may symbolize cither what has been described in (5) above (but now given exaggerated, dramatic expression) or the actual destruction of some essential, because natural, part of your psyche. The second alternative would indicate some fear of your own instinctive nature, some phobic undervaluing of the body, the senses, or sex. You would have to be very honest to work out which of these alternatives - an irrational slaughter (repression) of the natural self (a symbolic castration), or a rational taming of an instinct diat is threatening the balance of the psyche - is applicable in your own case.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

BULL

(1) In a woman’s dream the animus may appear as a bull (for animus)-(6)).

(2) The bull may refer to your masculinity (whether you are a man or a woman).

If you are a woman, it may refer to the opposite sex - perhaps expressing your (unconscious) feelings about men in general or a particular man.

(3) Animality’ may be symbolized. A man may experience his own sexuality as something bestial, getting in the way of his ‘higher5 pursuits; an object of disgust or fear.

Similarly, a woman may, consciously or unconsciously, see male sexuality as nasty and brutish; the same may apply to other aspects of masculinity - for example, the fighting, competitive aspect.

If a woman dreams of being chased by a bull, the meaning may be that she is afraid of sexual relations with men. The bull may represent the woman’s father - in which case she may need to dissolve her father fixation. In any case, the woman would need to assert her femininity, not repress it: her own confident femininity has power to tame wild male lust and transform it into tender sensual adoration.

(4) The taming or tethering of a bull may signify the harmonious integration of your animality, especially your sexuality, or the whole of the hidden, unconscious part of your psyche. See also section (8) below.

(5) The sacrifice of a bull may signify a victory (achieved or needed) of spirituality over animality. Sacrifice is the relinquishing or transforming of something in order to attain something more desirable. But the mere killing of a bull might signify the repression of emotion or instinct, or of your masculinity.

(6) Is it the proverbial bull in a china shop: the accident-prone blunderer, the person who never seems to have any luck and for whom everything goes wrong?

If so, the image may be seen as a warning that you need to change your self-image - which may entail changing your job or even your domestic situation.

It is no good thinking of making a living as a concert pianist if you have fingers missing. Take an honest look at yourself and build your career and your life on your strong points, not your weak ones. Give up your fantasies and take a good look at reality. Pay special attention to your dreams: they may now begin to reveal to

you your real strengths - buried talents, perhaps, that need to be dug up from your unconscious. (On persona)

Resist putting the blame for your ‘bad luck’ on someone or something else. Perhaps what we call ‘bad luck’ is actually brought about, not by chance, but by our innermost attitude towards life, which in turn is generated by a negative attitude towards ourselves.

(7) The bull may symbolize fertility (as in mythology). Your unconscious has the power to bring about new life if you allow it to penetrate your conscious mind.

(8) The bull may represent the self (in the Jungian sense), your true nature. Yes, those depths of the psyche that are despised or feared by the conscious ego may eventually be seen - by dint of constant self-exploration - as your true self.

(There are links here with (4) above. There is a famous series of Zen Buddhist drawings depicting the finding, tethering and taming of an ox, representing the search for one’s true nature and its discovery and realization through wrestling with and controlling one’s wild and stubborn egoistic self.)... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

FALLING

(1) If the falling is a result of climbing or flying, the symbolism is probably straightforward: having ‘got above yourself, you are now paying the price; or the dream may be warning you of possible future disastrous consequences of present behaviour or ambitions - as in the proverbial ‘Pride before a fall’ - in which case your present ambitions are out of tune with your real self, your real capacities.

It is not necessarily a case of conscious self-aggrandizement; indeed, usually one is not conscious of it at all. Hence the need for the dream! Self-inflation may be of two kinds: where the ego is ‘possessed’ by some unconscious factor; or where the ego will not deign to pay attention to the unconscious; or both.

If you are prone to accidents, these may be symptomatic of an ego that is too much under the control of (unintegrated) unconscious forces.

(2) The fear of falling felt in a dream may be symbolic of your real-life fear of letting go. Perhaps the dream is urging you to stop resisting an impulse from the unconscious.

The anxiety expressing itself in a dream of falling may best be dealt with by letting yourself go with the fall, with a view to both finding out what it is that you are frightened of and finding a way of transforming the anxiety-response into a more positive and creative response. Strephon Kaplan-Williams recommends that you stay with the falling in the dream itself (having prepared yourself to do so beforehand), not wake up before the end of the dream. As a way of preparing yourself to do that, you might try writing out the dream again - or re-living it in imagination - only this time letting the fall complete itself. You may learn a lot from this. See also Flying, section (4) and Introduction, pages 14—15 and 38-39.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

HERMAPHRODITE

(a partly male, partly female figure)

(1) A hermaphrodite may denote the ‘marriage’ of conscious and unconscious components of the psyche. The ‘marriage’ may be total or partial, depending on how much of your unconscious you have integrated into your conscious attitudes and actions.

(2) It may symbolize (the need for) perfect balance between the masculine and feminine sides of your nature (for anima / animus, see Brother / Sister, section (4)). Every man has feminine components in his psyche, every woman has masculine components in hers. These contrasexual components are usually suppressed by social convention. However, neglect of the contrasexual side of your nature results in a lopsided development.

Dogmatism in a woman comes from an unintegrated animus. Similarly, a man who has not brought his masculine and feminine sides into harmony may be fickle, moody, and prone to emotional outbursts. See also Couple, section (2), Marriage.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

CHILDHOOD DREAMS

Research has shown that sensitive or gifted children tend to be more prone to dreams and nightmares. Dreams in childhood often mirror the stress and confusion that is associated with the early years of our lives. Frightening dreams or nightmares are common to children up to the age of around eight.

If you are a concerned parent, simply talking about the dream with your child can help dissipate the tension around them. Avoid the instinct to tell the child that it was just a dream and that dreams aren’t real, as this may discourage your child from confiding in you, or simply frustrate them because you don’t take it seriously. You may also have a child who dreams with their eyes open for a few seconds after the dream is over and they are awake. In general, such experiences are not signs of a disorder, but if you are concerned, talk to your doctor or a pediatrician.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

DISASTERS

When nature pushes the elements to the extreme, the result is often explosive.

Volcanoes and lightning create fire, an unstable earth unleashes quakes and avalanches, water creates floods and drought, and air stirs hurricanes and typhoons into furious motion. Manmade disasters also create explosive and devastating results. People’s lives are tragically ended or irreparably damaged in seconds, panic and fear take over, and the best and worst of human nature is exposed. It is small wonder, then, that the unconscious often employs the symbols of catastrophe and disaster to provide striking and memorable dream images or messages.

Dreams of disaster, such as those involving earthquakes and plane crashes, can be extremely detailed, intense, colorful and vivid. You may wake up terrified and concerned for your safety, or for the safety of loved ones. To dream of any kind of disaster is always unsettling, but it is important to point out that such dreams are rarely prophetic or precognitive; it is much more likely that they are an expression of your hidden fears or anxieties concerning events you feel are beyond your control. A disaster dream may be expressing anxiety about what the future will bring, or highlighting the fact that you are trying to do too many things, or trying to please too many people, at the expense of your own peace of mind. On the other hand, disaster dreams can also reveal great inner change and growth, but this change and growth may make you feel temporarily uncertain of yourself, your direction in life and your position in the world.

Group disaster dreams can be particularly frightening and they may even recur, making it easier to assume that they might be warnings of actual events. Although there are rare exceptions, it is important to point out that vehicles and locations crowded with people who experience disaster are usually symbolic, reflecting our experience with a social influence or a reallife group. For example, if you dream of being in a bus crash that leaves you dazed and miles from home, you may be feeling increasingly disillusioned and detached from the goals of your place of work; your hopes of achieving satisfaction in that area of your life may in fact be already wrecked. Your dreaming mind may be telling you that you have gone as far as you can with that group of people, or course of action, and it is time to change your approach or lifestyle.

In some instances, dreams about disaster that involve surroundings or people you know may be a simple warning. For example, you may have forgotten that your car is due for a service, but your unconscious remembers and tries to draw your attention to this oversight in a dream in which you are driving your car and the brakes suddenly fail.

If you have lived through a natural or manmade disaster, your dream may also be recalling the horrific events in an attempt to help you come to terms with the trauma. According to Gestalt therapists, dreams that repeat a disturbing event or focus on disaster scenarios following an experience of physical or emotional trauma are reminding the dreamer that there is an emotional scar that needs attention and healing.

Finally, when trying to interpret any dream that involved a natural disaster, remember that if you live in an area that is prone to them your dream may simply be reflecting your anxiety about being caught up in such a catastrophe. The same applies to manmade disasters, such as terrorist attacks or train crashes. Your dream may be triggered by the climate of fear, and intense media coverage and speculation that now surround these tragic events. See also ACCIDENTS, ACTION AND ADVENTURES; NIGHTMARES.... The Element Encyclopedia

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HURRICANE / TORNADO

Although it might be possible to dream about a major weather disaster before it occurred, it is much more likely that you are dreaming about some kind of emotional turmoil occurring in your waking life. In fact, dreams of tornadoes are often symbolic of ongoing verbal arguments, fighting and emotional tension occurring in a relationship. A tornado is made up of wind moving very fast, just as air comes out of one’s mouth very fast during an argument. With this in mind, the next time one of these ‘tornado’ dreams occur, look at what has just taken place in your waking life. Have you just had an argument with someone? Has someone had an argument with you? Overall, the presence of tornadoes or hurricanes in dream land suggests that you are an extremely emotional person and that either you (or those around you) are prone to emotional outbursts.

Alternatively, you may feel as if you are being swept along by forces beyond your control—perhaps someone’s passion. A hurricane can also represent the power of your own passion, or passionate belief, which picks you up and carries you along.... The Element Encyclopedia

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LIFE-AND-DEATH STRUGGLE

Life-and-death struggles are common in dreams, but in some cases these dreams end with a struggle to avoid catastrophe. These are the sorts of dream in which almost every stranger turns out to be an enemy. Even the landscape of these dreams is laden with death traps, sharp ravines, wild fires, dangerous animals and so on.

If you have this kind of dream, the chances are you are fighting for survival in some aspect of your waking life. On the other hand, you may be the kind of person who makes ordinary choices and decisions as if their survival were at stake. For example, small disappointments or minor upsets send you into meltdown and you are frequently dissatisfied if some invisible inner standard has not been met.

If you are prone to life-and-death dreams, your unconscious is urging you to find a kind of security that cannot be lost. In other words, you need to look at things that are intangible and reside in your spirit and in your emotions, because everything else—since it is out of your control—is at risk. You need to develop greater flexibility and tolerance, and by so doing you can find contentment and peace.

If your life-and-death battle involves a war scene, the emphasis shifts.

Despite war’s disturbing and destructive nature, it can sometimes be represented as a cleansing process that represents a victory of good over evil. However, in dreams war is generally regarded as a warning that dangerous times lie ahead, as well as indicating inner conflicts and deep-seated grievances. An important aid for interpreting dreams of warfare is to remember whether you were on the winning or losing side.

If you were on the winning side, this suggests you are on the right track.

If you were on the losing side, what can you learn from the tactics of the winning side? Surprisingly, to dream that you are wounded in battle denotes that you have finally been accepted by your peers.... The Element Encyclopedia

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THE HISTORY AND SCIENCE OF NIGHTMARES

In ancient times, nightmares were thought to be caused by evil spirits. The word, in fact, derives from a Scandinavian legend in which a ‘nacht-mara’—the ‘mara’ being a female demon—came and sat on the sleeper’s chest at night, leaving him with a heavy, suffocating sensation of being awake but paralyzed. Nightmares have been known to inspire great artists: John Henry Fuseli’s 1781 painting ‘The Nightmare’ caused a sensation with its depiction of an incubus crouching on the body of a sleeping woman. John Newton—a slave trader and the composer of the hymn ‘Amazing Grace’—became an abolitionist after a nightmare in which he saw ‘all of Europe consumed in a great raging fire’ whilst he was the captain of a slave ship. Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde was inspired, in part, by a nightmare. Elias Howe, who invented the sewing machine, came up with the breakthrough concept of a needle with a hole at the pointed end after he had a nightmare in which jungle warriors brandished spears that had holes in their blades.

As we have seen, both Freud and Jung had theories regarding nightmares: Freud tried to explain them as the expression of unfulfilled wishes, whilst Jung described them as part of humankind’s ‘collective unconscious’ and argued that the helplessness we feel in nightmares is a memory of the fears experienced by primitive peoples. Today, in medical textbooks, nightmares are most commonly defined as a disturbing dream that results in at least a partial awakening.

Nightmares, in common with most dreams, occur during REM stages of sleep and they generally cause the dreamer to wake up.

If you don’t wake up, the dream is not technically a nightmare and could be described as a bad dream. Nightmares are often characterized by the following symptoms: a sense of fear and dread that lingers for hours or days after the dream upon awakening; the ability to recall all or part of a dream scene; in most cases the dreamer is threatened or actually harmed in some way; a recognition of powerful images in the dream or the repetition of the dream itself for months or even years after; and a physical paralysis or lack of muscle tone called atonia which signifies REM sleep.

Drugs, alcohol, lack of sleep and spicy food can alter the quality and quantity of REM sleep and perhaps trigger nightmares but there is no hard evidence to support this. Whilst these things can increase the risk of nightmares, the mundane struggles in daily life are generally thought to be the cause of most nightmares. Sleep researchers have discovered that long-standing nightmare sufferers tend to be emotional, creative, sensitive but prone to depression.

Modern sleep researchers have identified the following causes for nightmares:

• Unconscious memory of intense emotions such as that of a child being abandoned by its mother. Many people have had the experience of feeling trapped in a difficult situation—a terrible marriage or another situation they want to get out of—and nightmares can hark back to that situation, mirroring the intense feelings of being trapped associated with it.

• Intense experiences produced by external situations, such as involvement in war or being a victim of assault. Trauma, surgery, a death in the family, crime and accidents can also cause them to proliferate.

• Many nightmares in adults arise from fears connected with repressed internal drives or from fears concerning the process of growth and change.

• Threats to self-esteem. People may be faced by or fear the loss of something important to them, such as the failure of a relationship or the loss of a child, being seen to fail at work or not being able to cope with life in other ways. Nightmares may arise out of feelings of inferiority or loss of self-confidence.

Some sleep researchers consider the occasional nightmare to be a natural response to stress; the dream is seen to be the body’s way of practicing its ‘fight or flee’ response, providing us with a way to work through aggressive feelings in a safe way, given that the body’s muscles are essentially paralyzed during REM sleep.... The Element Encyclopedia

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DIFFICULTY / PROBLEM

Dreams in which you are struggling to climb an unknown mountain or cliff, fighting your way through snow and ice, wading through a bog, or lost and wandering alone in a forest or jungle apply to a number of difficulties you may be encountering in your waking life. In most instances, such dreams only occur when you have tried to solve a problem and all your options seem to have been exhausted. Such a dream may be reflecting your reallife difficulties and the emotional or mental struggles you are facing.

If you are prone to such dreams, you might want to try asking your dreaming mind to show you a way off the mountain or out of the jungle, forest or bog just before you go to sleep. Your dream may respond by offering you another dream scenario that may contain symbolic clues to help you solve your waking problem.

Any problem, obstacle or irritation you face in dreamland, such as being unable to find a pen when you need one, light bulbs suddenly going out, being unable to pick something up, trying and failing to start a car or put up a deckchair or assemble a pushchair can suggest a problem in waking life that you are finding difficult to resolve. Your dreaming mind has thousands upon thousands of symbolic disguises to draw upon, so whenever things don’t go smoothly in dreamland, the chances are this indicates situations in waking life that you are struggling to resolve.... The Element Encyclopedia

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PRECOGNITIVE DREAM

There are many types of precognitive dream that allow you to visit potential futures, giving choices and decisions a run through to learn about the possible consequences.

If you are prone to having dreams that are more than just glimpses of the future but include entire stories or sequences of events that later happen in waking life, you may find that as well as examining possible causes of action that lie ahead, they may also zero in on important junctures or decisions in life long before they arrive. Experts disagree over whether or not this is possible, but it is possible that your life previews are set up by your dreaming mind to alert you to, and help you recognize, the importance of your actions and decisions at these significant points in our life.

If you have a dream that you believe may contain a precognitive warning of a future accident or disaster, remember that it is only highlighting a possibility not a fact; if the time comes when it is fulfilled, you have the upper hand as your sense of familiarity with the situation will help you avoid or minimize harm or hurt. See also Precognitive dream entry in DISASTERS.... The Element Encyclopedia

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TELEPATHY IN DREAMS

You may experience dreams in which you pick up emotions or experience the same situations as others. For example, you dream of a loved one being rushed to hospital only to find in the morning that this is in fact the case and your father has had a stroke. In most cases, telepathic dreams occur between people who are close to each other; for example between family members, married couples or close friends. These dreams will be generally be for and about you; but if you really do not think this is the case, keep your mind open to the possibility that you may have been picking up sensations or feelings from loved ones.

If you are an empathic or sensitive person and know you are prone to such dreams, you can easily recognize them to avoid confusion.... The Element Encyclopedia

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ADOLESCENCE

Technically the teenage years or adolescence extends from about the age of twelve to eighteen, or twenty-one at the latest. As you grow older, you may find that your dreams look back to your teenage years with feelings of wistfulness.

You may not want to go through the torments of adolescence again but you may like to unite your maturity and experience with your youthful energy and enthusiasm. Whereas dreams of childhood tend to be nostalgic, dreams that feature teenagers tend to be about wish-fulfillment.

If you are no longer a teenager, a dream in which you become a teenager again and hang out with your friends at a disco suggests that you are coping with life at present and not taking it too seriously. On the other hand, your dreaming mind may be urging you to chill out more.

If you revisit your teenage years in your dream or dream of teenagers, your dreaming mind may be urging you to recover some of your creativity, energy and sense of freedom.

If the young man or woman in the dream was acting in an immature way, as adolescents are prone to do, could your dream be warning you that your present behavior is stupid, immature and unproductive? If your dream featured images of school, examinations or college, the implication may be that you need to broaden your mind or take up new challenges. Alternatively, if school was a place of unhappy memories for you, it could be urging you to have a more positive, upbeat approach to life.... The Element Encyclopedia

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LIFE AND DEATH STRUGGLE

The struggle for survival in dreamland is reflected in symbols such as quicksand, dangerous animals, wildfire, war and enemies; these all suggest the need to find a kind of security that cannot be taken away from you.

If you are prone to life-and-death struggles in your dreams, your dreaming mind is telling you that there is only one way to find the security that cannot be lost: you need to place value on things that are not material, as everything else is at risk. The things that cannot be lost reside in your heart and your spirit. This doesn’t mean you should stop focusing on the material in life; it simply means that you need to find peace and contentment by being more flexible and tolerant in waking life.... The Element Encyclopedia

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REJECTION

In this kind of dream trusted friends or allies end up betraying you or murdering you.

If you are prone to this kind of dream, the chances are you are extremely loyal, kind, helpful and unselfish in waking life and your dreaming mind is urging you to say ‘no more’ in an attempt to try and put your own needs first for once.... The Element Encyclopedia

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WEATHER

The weather conditions in a dream tend to reflect the emotional climate or the forces with which you are currently contending. Tornado dreams are particularly common in the United States, and tend to represent some kind of emotional storm or someone in the dreamer’s life who is prone to emotional outbursts.... The Element Encyclopedia

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NIGHTMARES

Children, especially, are prone to nightmares. Nightmares are common in children, typically beginning at around age 3 and occurring up to age 7-8.

People with anxiety disorder might also experience what experts term “night terrors”. These are actually panic attacks that occur in sleep.

It is especially difficult to remember these types of dreams since they conjure up terrifying images that we would just as soon forget.

In poetic myth, the Nightmare is actually a “small nettlesome mare, not more than thirteen hands high, of the breed familiar with the Elgin marbles: cream-colored, clean- limbed, with a long head, bluish eye, flowing mane and tail.” Her nests, called mares’ nests, “when one comes across them in dreams, lodged in rock-clefs or the branches of enormous hollow yews, are built of carefully chosen twigs lined with white horse-hair and the plumage of prophetic birds and littered with the jaw-bones and entrails of poets.”

Thus, in a pagan world of myth and blood sacrifice, the Nightmare was a cruel, fearful creature. Our modern word nightmare derives from the Middle English nihtmare (from niht, night, and mare, demon), an evil spirit believed to haunt and suffocate sleeping people. And so, in today’s world, when we speak of a nightmare we mean a frightening dream accompanied by a sensation of oppression and helplessness.

The blood-thirsty aspect of the mythic Nightmare, however, can give a good clue about nightmares in general, for in psychodynamic terms nightmares are graphic depictions of raw, primitive emotions such as aggression and rage that have not been incorporated into the conscious psyche. Thus we tend to encounter these “ugly” aspects of our unconscious lives as terrifying dream images in whose presence we feel completely helpless.

Nightmares are quite common in childhood because this is a time of our emotional development when we all have to come to terms with, well, raw, primitive emotions such as aggression and rage.

Traumatic nightmares can also occur as one of the many symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Repetitive, intrusive nightmares following a trauma often contain symbolic themes that mirror the original trauma and relate to threat to life, threat of abandonment or death, or loss of identity.

Therefore, traumatic nightmares need to be treated differently than other dreams. It’s not enough just to “know” intellectually the psychological reasons why you have these nightmares. An event is traumatic because it disrupts your previously secure—and illusory—sense of “self.” And so, to heal from a trauma, you must take the initiative to make conscious changes in your life to accommodate the traumatic shattering of your illusions about life and identity.

Some believe that nightmares have a physiological nature as well. Edgar Cayce believed that Nightmares, which bring with them an inability to move or cry out, usually indicate the wrong diet. To end the nightmarish dreams change your diet.

We found a technique online that can help people who suffer from recurrent nightmares. It is not meant to be a cure-all. It is just a suggested treatment to deal with frightening nightmares. The idea is to use this therapy every night until the nightmare has been resolved. It is called Imagery Rehearsal Therapy.

Here are the steps of Imagery Rehearsal Therapy:

  • Write out the text of the nightmare. Tell the story, no matter how frightening, in as much detail as you can remember.
  • Create a new ending for the nightmare story and write it out. Be careful, however, to make the new ending peaceful. Remember that the nightmare is grounded in emotions such as raw anger that have been provoked by a trauma. The point of a new ending is to “tame” the emotions, not merely vent them in violence and revenge.
  • Rehearse the new version of the story in your imagination each night just before going to sleep. Do this as close as possible to your falling asleep without any other activity between the rehearsal and sleep.
  • Perform a relaxation exercise. Do this immediately after the rehearsal, as a way to fall asleep peacefully. You may use any technique with which you are familiar. This could be meditation, yoga, or breathing exercises.The “cousin” of nightmares is disturbing dreams with unpleasant images.
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SUN SIGNS AND DREAMS

The Sun signs of astrology can appear in dreams, through the following correspondences:
See also: SPACE AND SCIENCE.

Aries

  • (21 March-19 April) is the cardinal fire sign, and is dynamic and action oriented. Associated with: soldiers, angry people, athletes; the ram; the owl; Mars; red; tiger lily; ruby; number one; head, brain, eyes, face, teeth; and typical dreams might be set in stadiums or battlefields. The best-known symbol for this first sign of the Zodiac in Western astrology is the ram, the ruling planet is Mars. Aries is influenced by the fire element. People born under the sign of Aries tend to be enterprising, impulsive, warm-hearted and confident free spirits who say what they mean and mean what they say, but they can also be impatient, rash, tactless, excitable and bossy.

Taurus

  • (20 April-20 May) is the fixed earth sign, and is solid, dependable and sensual. Associated with: singers, lovers, gardeners, models; the bull; Venus; red-orange; mallow; topaz; number two; the neck area, voice, ears, thyroid and cerebellum; and dreams set in a luxurious home or a beautiful setting. The best-known symbol of Taurus is the bull and the ruling planet is Venus. Taureans are influenced by the earth element. Those born under the sign of Taurus are persistent, reliable, loyal and patient individuals with a discriminating taste for quality and the good things in life. The downside is that they can at times be lazy, materialistic and moody.

Gemini

  • (21 May-21 June) is the mutable air sign, and is changeable, social and a coordinator. Associated with: teachers, talkers, writers, twins; magpies; orange; Mercury; orchid; tourmaline; number three; arms, hands, shoulders, lungs, thymus, nervous system, speech; and typical dream settings might be high-up places. The twins are the best-known symbol for Gemini and the ruling planet is Mercury. Geminis are influenced by the air element. Those born under Gemini are intellectual, natural communicators but they can also be inconsistent and flighty at times. Their endearing zest for ideas and something new sometimes makes committing to anyone and anything problematic.

Cancer

  • (22 June-22 July) is the cardinal water sign, and is shy, self- protective and nurturing. Associated with: chefs, mothers, carers; crab; turtle; Moon; yellow-orange; lotus; amber; moonstone; number four; stomach, esophagus, pancreas, breasts, womb, ribs, digestive system; and a typical dream setting is of a cottage by the sea. The best-known symbol for Cancer is the crab and the ruling planet is the Moon. Cancerians are influenced by the water element. Those born under Cancer tend to be emotional and empathetic with a wacky sense of humor, but they can be oversensitive and insecure at times.

Leo

  • (23 July-22 August) is the fixed fire sign, and is outgoing, an entertainer and warm. Associated with: actors, salespeople, motivational speakers; lion; Sun; yellow; Sunflower; cat’s eye; number five; the heart, spinal cord, circulation, spleen, pulse; and a typical dream setting is a stage. The best-known symbol for Leo is the lion and the ruling planet is the Sun. Leo is influenced by the fire element. Those born under Leo tend to be courageous, vivacious, energetic and natural leaders but they can also be prone to arrogance and be attention seeking.

Virgo

  • (23 August-22 September) is the mutable earth sign, and is reserved, particular and intelligent. Associated with: dieticians, auditors, priestesses; virgin; Mercury; yellow-green; narcissus; peridot; number six; assimilation, food and diet, intestines, bowels, nails; and dream surroundings that are orderly and neat. The best-known symbol of Virgo is the virgin and the ruling planet is Mercury. Virgos are influenced by the earth element. Those born under Virgo tend to be meticulous, disciplined and analytical. They can appear cool and reserved, but great sensitivity lies behind the detached exterior.

Libra

  • (23 September-23 October) is the cardinal air sign, and is elegant, refined and cultured. Associated with: princes or princesses, artists, musicians; scales; elephant; Venus; green; aloe; emerald; number seven; adrenals, kidneys, lumbar region, skin; and the ideal dream landscape is a rose garden. The scales are the best- known symbol of Libra and the ruling planet is Venus. Librans are influenced by the air element. Those born under Libra tend to be peace-loving, agreeable, harmonious people but their natural ability to understand the viewpoint of everyone and fit in everywhere can be interpreted as insecurity and indecisiveness.

Scorpio

  • (24 October-21 November) is the fixed water sign, and is introverted, intense, and magnetic. Associated with: Grim Reaper; dark figures, exotic people; scorpion; eagle; phoenix; Mars; Pluto; blue-green; cactus; turquoise; number eight; bladder, genitals, colon, prostate, uterus, sex organs; and a typical dream setting would be a bedroom. The best-known symbol of Scorpio is the scorpion and the ruling planets are Mars and Pluto. Scorpios are influenced by the water element. Those born under Scorpio tend to be passionate, focused, sensitive and sensual, but they can also be secretive and destructive.

Sagittarius

  • (22 November—21 December) is the mutable fire sign, and is adventurous, curious and wise. Associated with: hunters, horseback riders, explorers; archery; Centaur; Jupiter; blue; rush; jacinth; number nine; hips, thighs, arteries, base of spine, pelvis; and a typical dream setting would be scenes around a campfire. The best-known symbol for Sagittarius is the archer and the ruling planet is Jupiter. Sagittarians are influenced by the fire element. Those born under Sagittarius tend to be unconventional, idealistic and visionary with a need to seek spiritual enlightenment, but they can also be reckless and ruthless.

Capricorn

  • (22 December-19 January) is the cardinal earth sign, and is conservative, organized and determined. Associated with: mountain climbers, accountants, bankers; mountain goat; Saturn; indigo; hemp; jet; number ten; bones, skeleton, joints, cartilage; and a dream setting might be an old house at the top of a hill. The best- known symbol of Capricorn is the goat and the ruling planet is Saturn. Capricorns are influenced by the earth element. Those born under the sign of Capricorn are persistent, cautious, self-disciplined, warmhearted and stable, but they can also at times be mean and inflexible.

Aquarius

  • (20 January-18 February) is the fixed air sign, and is humanitarian, unique and interesting. Associated with electricians, conductors, Eskimos; water bearer; man; star; Uranus; violet; olive; chalcedony; number eleven, ankles, calves, circulation, breath, eyesight; and a dream setting might be a cold place or planet. The best-known symbol of Aquarius is the water carrier and the ruling planets are Saturn and Uranus. Aquarius is influenced by the air element. Those born under the sign of Aquarius tend to be idealistic, intellectual, generous, altruistic and unconventional, but they can also be unpredictable and emotionally detached at times.

Pisces

  • (19 February-20 March) is the mutable water sign, and is dreamy, imaginative and otherworldly. Associated with: religious teachers, monks and nuns, photographers; fish; dolphin; Neptune; red-violet; poppy; pearl; number twelve; feet, toes, lymph glands; and a typical dream setting might be a cathedral. The best-known symbol of Pisces is two fish and the ruling planets are Jupiter and Neptune. Pisceans are influenced by the water element. Those born under the sign of Pisces tend to be intuitive, sensitive and spiritual but they can also be dreamy, impractical and impressionable at times.
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