Quite | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Quite


BABY

To dream of crying babies, is indicative of ill health and disappointments.

A bright, clean baby, denotes love requited, and many warm friends. Walking alone, it is a sure sign of independence and a total ignoring of smaller spirits.

If a woman dream she is nursing a baby, she will be deceived by the one she trusts most.

It is a bad sign to dream that you take your baby if sick with fever. You will have many sorrows of mind. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

CARNIVAL

To dream that you are participating in a carnival, portends that you are soon to enjoy some unusual pleasure or recreation.

A carnival when masks are used, or when incongruous or clownish figures are seen, implies discord in the home; business will be unsatisfactory and love unrequited. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

DUSK

This is a dream of sadness; it portends an early decline and unrequited hopes. Dark outlook for trade and pursuits of any nature is prolonged by this dream. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

ESTATE

To dream that you come into the ownership of a vast estate, denotes that you will receive a legacy at some distant day, but quite different to your expectations.

For a young woman, this dream portends that her inheritance will be of a disappointing nature. She will have to live quite frugally, as her inheritance will be a poor man and a house full of children. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

FINGERS

To dream of seeing your fingers soiled or scratched, with the blood exuding, denotes much trouble and suffering. You will despair of making your way through life.

To see beautiful hands, with white fingers, denotes that your love will be requited and that you will become renowned for your benevolence.

To dream that your fingers are cut clean off, you will lose wealth and a legacy by the intervention of enemies. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

LADDER

To dream of a ladder being raised for you to ascend to some height, your energetic and nervy qualifications will raise you into prominence in business affairs.

To ascend a ladder, means prosperity and unstinted happiness.

To fall from one, denotes despondency and unsuccessful transactions to the tradesman, and blasted crops to the farmer.

To see a broken ladder, betokens failure in every instance.

To descend a ladder, is disappointment in business, and unrequited desires.

To escape from captivity, or confinement, by means of a ladder, you will be successful, though many perilous paths may intervene.

To grow dizzy as you ascend a ladder, denotes that you will not wear new honors serenely. You are likely to become haughty and domineering in your newly acquired position. See Hill, Ascend, or Fall.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

MOUNTAIN

For a young woman to dream of crossing a mountain in company with her cousin and dead brother, who was smiling, denotes she will have a distinctive change in her life for the better, but there are warnings against allurements and deceitfulness of friends.

If she becomes exhausted and refuses to go further, she will be slightly disappointed in not gaining quite so exalted a position as was hoped for by her.

If you ascend a mountain in your dreams, and the way is pleasant and verdant, you will rise swiftly to wealth and prominence.

If the mountain is rugged, and you fail to reach the top, you may expect reverses in your life, and should strive to overcome all weakness in your nature.

To awaken when you are at a dangerous point in ascending, denotes that you will find affairs taking a flattering turn when they appear gloomy. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

POCKETBOOK

To find a pocketbook filled with bills and money in your dreams, you will be quite lucky, gaining in nearly every instance your desire.

If empty, you will be disappointed in some big hope.

If you lose your pocketbook, you will unfortunately disagree with your best friend, and thereby lose much comfort and real gain. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

RAIN

To be out in a clear shower of rain, denotes that pleasure will be enjoyed with the zest of youth, and prosperity will come to you.

If the rain descends from murky clouds, you will feel alarmed over the graveness of your undertakings.

To see and hear rain approaching, and you escape being wet, you will succeed in your plans, and your designs will mature rapidly.

To be sitting in the house and see through the window a downpour of rain, denotes that you will possess fortune, and passionate love will be requited.

To hear the patter of rain on the roof, denotes a realization of domestic bliss and joy. Fortune will come in a small way.

To dream that your house is leaking during a rain, if the water is clear, foretells that illicit pleasure will come to you rather unexpectedly; but if filthy or muddy, you may expect the reverse, and also exposure.

To find yourself regretting some duty unperformed while listening to the rain, denotes that you will seek pleasure at the expense of another’s sense of propriety and justice.

To see it rain on others, foretells that you will exclude friends from your confidence.

For a young woman to dream of getting her clothes wet and soiled while out in a rain, denotes that she will entertain some person indiscreetly, and will suffer the suspicions of friends for the unwise yielding to foolish enjoyments.

To see it raining on farm stock, foretells disappointment in business, and unpleasantness in social circles. Stormy rains are always unfortunate. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

SEA

To dream of hearing the lonely sighing of the sea, foretells that you will be fated to spend a weary and unfruitful life devoid of love and comradeship. Dreams of the sea, prognosticate unfulfilled anticipations, while pleasures of a material form are enjoyed, there is an inward craving for pleasure that flesh cannot requite.

For a young woman to dream that she glides swiftly over the sea with her lover, there will come to her sweet fruition of maidenly hopes, and joy will stand guard at the door of the consummation of changeless vows. See Ocean. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

STRAWBERRIES

To dream of strawberries, is favorable to advancement and pleasure. You will obtain some long wished-for object.

To eat them, denotes requited love.

To deal in them, denotes abundant harvest and happiness.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

WHITE MOTH

To dream of a white moth, foretells unavoidable sickness, though you will be tempted to accuse yourself or some other with wrong-doing, which you think causes the complaint.

For a woman to see one flying around in the room at night, forebodes unrequited wishes and disposition which will effect the enjoyment of other people.

To see a moth flying and finally settling upon something, or disappearing totally, foreshadows death of friends or relatives. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

NECKLACE

1. Circular connection, often spiritual (as in rosary or prayer beads).

2. Social or official status, influence.

3. Attaining requited love. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

OBLONG

Odd shape signifies something is not quite right in what the dreamer is observing. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

ADVENTURE

Desire to travel brings new and exciting avenues opening in your life soon.

The type of adventure governs the interpretation of this dream, and while its meaning is quite straightforward, you must bear in mind that in this exceptional case the prediction pertains only to your feeling about the adventure, rather than the details of it (i.e., pleased, amused, distressed, excited, ashamed, etc.), and you can expect an experience of a similar character shortly. So if your dream adventure left you feeling guilty--put up your guard! If the dream concerned an adventurer, or adventuress, you are probably in for a surprising change of environment. ... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

AUTONOMOUS COMPLEX

Many of the characters or elements of our dreams act quite contrary to what we wish ourself. This is why we often find it so difficult to believe all aspects of a dream are pan of our own psyche. Some drives or areas of self do act or express, despite our attempts 10 contain them. These are named autonomous complexes. Recent research into brain activity shows that in fact the brain has different layers or strata of activity. These strata often act independently of each other or of conscious will. Sensing them, as one might in a dream, might feel like meeting an opposing will. Integration with these aspects of self can be gained. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

EMOTIONS, MOOD

There is a level of human experience which is typified by intense emotional and physical response to life. Such emotions and bodily drives may remain almost entirely unconscious until touched by exploring our dream content in the right setting. When such feelings and bodily movements arise, as they do in dreams, we may be amazed at their power and clarity. See dream processing; sleep move­ments.

If we take away the images and events occurring in a dream and simply look to see what feelings or emotions are evident, the dream is often more understandable than if we try to interpret the symbols. Feelings in dreams are nearly always undistoned. We therefore do not need to interpret them, sim­ply to acknowledge them and see if we can recognise where they occur in waking life.

The images in a dream may be the way we unconsciously pictorialise our flux of feelings and the play of internal energy flows.

For instance love or sexual drive can give rise to physical movement—as in sexual intercourse. Repression of sex or love also represses such physical move­ments, leading to tension and conflict, which might be pre­sented in the drama of a dream.

Example: ‘I was with my wife, walking along a street, on holiday with her. But I felt awful tension. It was the son of stress I feel when I have turned off my sexual flow—as I have at the moment’ (Brian V). Brian can easily see the connection between the dream feelings and his everyday life, although sometimes we need to practise this. But the situation could as easily be expressed as a dream image of a blocked river.

The underlying feelings would then be less easy to grasp.

Example: ‘I was in a very ancient crumbling building, con­fronted by a large stone door, deeply engraved with many designs and creatures. I began to open the door and felt high feelings of anxiety. I realised this was an initiation and I must calm my feelings in order to pass beyond the door, i.e. if I were controlled by my feelings I would run away’ (Derek F). How we meet the emotions in our dreams illustrates our ha­bitual method of dealing with them.

The feelings of anxiety in Derek’s dream were met and moved beyond, but this is un­usual. This is because most of us change our direction as soon as there is a hint of fear.

The amount of nicotine and alcohol human beings consume suggests how poorly we meet anxiety. Going beyond fear or pain is an initiation which opens doors for us. We might now apply for the job, ask for the date, raise the issue, express the creativity, make the journey abroad, which anxiety previously kept us from. We see this in the next example: I had a ring on my marriage finger. It was a thin band of gold. I woke up frightened’ (Angela). Angela is not married and feels anxiety about the commitment.

Dreams give us a safe area to express emotions which might be difficult or dangerous to release socially. Anger in a dream may be expressing what we failed to express in a wak­ing encounter, or it might be our habitual response. It may also be directed against ourself. Dreams also contain many positive emotions. Sometimes they present a new aspect of feeling which is life enhancing.

A person who habitually felt at odds with her father and relatives experienced a dream in which she felt forgiveness for the first time. This was entirely new for her and led to a reconciliation with her family.

Some feeling states in a dream are subtle, and may be more evident in terms of the symbols than the feelings.

A grey drear environment suggests depression and lack of pleasure.

A sunny light environment with flowers and colour shows plea­sure and good feelings.

A country landscape depicts quite a different feeling state to a smoky busy city street. We can define these for ourself using the techniques described under dream processing.

Whatever feelings or emotions we meet in our dreams, many of them are bound to be habitual responses we have to life. Where these habits are negative we can begin to change them by working with the dream images as described in the last question under dream processing. See love; hostility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

FIRE

Passion; sexuality, anger, desire; burning feelings such as resentment or frustration; our desire to destroy. Also our life process, often described as a flame which burns forever through different generations but leaves only ash behind, our vital energy; occasionally refers to physical illness.

Example: T was in a small terraced house with a friend I had known years earlier. It was her house, there were two or three children in it. Suddenly it caught fire, I wanted to stay and put the fire out but she did not. She dragged me outside and down the street. We saw the house burn down. I had this dream the day I got home from hospital, after undergoing a hysterectomy’ (Mrs G). Here the fire depicts the consuming feelings of loss regarding Mrs G’s childbearing function. Also the loss of an area or era of life. Underground flames: uncon­scious emotions or desires which one may need to face for real growth. Fire in the sky: great changes in viewpoint; meet­ing the next step in maturity.

Example: ‘I found quite a large old fireplace. I asked my husband if he would like a fire. I thought it would be cosy if we both enjoyed the fire together. Woke up with a warm feeling towards my husband; he reached out to me’ (Dinah Y). Here fire is not only homemaking and human warmth, but also sexuality. Fireplace: homeliness; the womb. Idioms: bap­tism of fire; between two fires; fire up; go through fire and water; play with fire; under fire; the old illness/love flared up. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

GARDEN

Generally, the inner life of the dreamer, the area of growth or change in your life; what you are trying to cultivate in yourself; feelings of peace; being near to one’s natural self, meditative attitude. See also second example in wife under family.

Example: ‘I was working in quite a large garden by my house.

A pan of the garden was like a little alcove by other buildings.

The garden was kidney shaped. I had dug this small plot and was considering how I might relax and sun­bathe there. My daughter said I should have worked harder on it—dug it better. I felt intense emotions of resentment and anger at her criticism. I staned telling her what a bad time I had in the past. How difficult it was even to work, let alone work hard’ (Beatrice G). This shows the garden as depicting what one has ‘worked on’ or produced in life. This could mean externally, or one’s own nature.

The daughter is Bea­trice’s own self criticism, which pushes her on, though she has a tendency to want to relax ‘in the sun*. This aspect of garden suggests how ‘fruitful’ one’s life has been socially and spiritually.

Beautiful garden: suggests satisfaction at time of dream. Overgrown, weeds in garden: awareness of particular parts of your personality which need working on. Perhaps negative habits need weeding out’. Square, circular garden: holds a lot of your gathered wisdom and insights which would be useful if made conscious. Garden pool: childhood, or early stage in the evolution of one’s self consciousness, during which there was a sense of communal awareness; sense of unity with life. See dream processing; the self under archetypes. Idioms: bear garden, up the garden path. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

HALLUCINATIONS, HALLUCINOGENS

Example: ‘1 dream insects are dropping either on me from the ceiling of our bedroom, or crawling over my pillow. My long-suffering husband is always woken when I sit bolt upright in bed, my eyes wide open and my arm pointing at the ceiling. I try to brush them off. I can still see them—spiders or woodlice. I am now well aware it is a dream. But no matter how hard I stare the insects are there in perfect detail. I am not frightened, but wish it would go away’ (Sue D). Sue’s dream only became a hallucination when she opened her eyes and continued to see the insects in per­fect clarity.

A hallucination can be experienced through any of the senses singly, or all of them together. So one might have a hallucinatory smell or sound.

To understand hallucinations, which are quite common without any use of drugs such as alcohol, LSD or cannabis, one must remember that everyone has the natural ability to produce such images. One of the definitions of a dream according to Freud is its hallucinatory quality. While asleep we can create full sensory, vocal, motor and emotional expenence in our dream. While dreaming we usually accept what we experience as real.

A hallucination is an experience of the function which produces dreams’ occur­ring while we have our eyes open.

The voices heard, people seen, smells smelt, although appearing to be outside us, are no more exterior than the things and images of our dreams. With this information one can understand that much classed as psychic phenomena and religious experience is an encoun­ter with the dream process. That does not, of course, deny its imponance.

There are probably many reasons why Sue should experi­ence a hallucination and her husband not. One might be that powerful drives and emotions might be pushing for attention in her life. Some of the primary drives are the reproductive drive, urge towards independence, pressure to meet uncon­scious emotions and past trauma and fears, any of which, in order to achieve their ends, can produce hallucinations.

A hallucination is therefore not an ‘illusion’ but a means of giving information from deeper levels of self. Given such names as mediumship or mystical insight, in some cultures or individuals the ability to hallucinate is often rewarded so­cially.

Drugs such as LSD, cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, pey- ote and opium can produce hallucinations. This is sometimes because they allow the dream process to break through into consciousness with less intervention.

If this occurs without warning it can be very disturbing.

The very real dangers are that unconscious content, which in ordinary dreaming breaks through a threshold in a regu­lated way, emerges with little regulation. Fears, paranoid feel­ings, past traumas, can emerge into the consciousness of an individual who has no skill in handling such dangerous forces. Because the propensity of the unconscious is to create images, an area of emotion might emerge in an image such as the devil. Such images, and the power they contain, not being integrated in a proper therapeutic setting, may haunt the indi­vidual, perhaps for years. Even at a much milder level, ele­ments of the unconscious will emerge and disrupt the person’s ability to appraise reality and make judgments. Un­acknowledged fears may lead the drug user to rationalise their reasons for avoiding social activity or the world of work. See ESP and dreams; dead lover in husband under family. See also out of body experience.... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

HUSBAND

Depicts how you see the relationship with your husband; your relationship with your sexuality; sexual and emotional desire and pleasure; how you relate to intimacy in body, mind and spirit; habits of relationship developed with one’s father.

Example: ‘My recurring dream—some disaster is happen­ing. I try to contact the police or my husband. Can never contact either. I try ringing 999 again and again and can feel terror, and sometimes dreadful anger or complete panic. I cry, I scream and shout and never get through! Recently I have stopped trying to contact my husband. I managed once to reach him but he said he was too busy and I would have to deal with it myself. I woke in a furious temper with him and kicked him while he was still asleep’ (Mrs GS).

The husband here depicts Mrs S’s feelings of not being able to get through’ to her man. This is a common female dream theme, possibly arising from the husband not daring to express emotion or meet his panner with his own feelings.

For Mrs S this is an emergency. Although the dream dramatises it, there is still real frustration, anger, and a break in marital communica­tions.

Example: There were three of us. My husband, a male friend and 1, all nding small white enamel bikes. My husband proceeded slowly, first, with his back to us. Then my friend followed. Suddenly my friend ahead of me turned and gazed fully at me. He gave a glonous smile which lit up the whole of his face. I felt a great sense of well-being surge through me’ (Joan B).

The triangle: the example shows typical flow of feeling towards another male.

The other male here depicts

Joan’s desire to be attractive to other men. This is a danger signal unless one fully acknowledges ihe impulse.

Example: ‘I was with my husband and our three children. About 2 or 3 yards to our right stood my husband’s first wife —she died about a year before I first met him. I remember feeling she no longer minded me being with him, so I put my arms around him from the back, and felt more secure and comfortable with him’ (Mrs NS).

The first wife: the dreamer is now feeling easier about her husband’s first relationship.

The first wife represents her sense of competing for her husband’s affections, even though his ‘first woman’ was dead.

Example: ‘My dead husband came into my bedroom and got into bed with me to make love to me. I was not afraid. But owing to his sexual appetites during my married life with him I was horrified, and resisted him with all my might. On wak­ing I felt weak and exhausted.

The last time he came to me I responded to him and he never came back again. This hap­pened three times.

The last time I don’t think it was a dream. I was not asleep. I think it was his ghost’ (GL). Dead hus­band: in any experience of an apparently psychic nature, we must always remember the unconscious is a great dramatist. It can create the drama of a dream in moments. In doing so it makes our inner feelings into apparently real people and ob­jects outside us. While asleep we lightly dismiss this amazing process as a dream’. When it happens while our eyes are open or we are near waking, for some reason we call it a ghost or psychic event. Yet the dream process is obviously capable of creating total body sensations, emotions, full visual impres­sions, vocalisation—what else is a dream? On the other hand, the dream process is not dealing in pointless imaginations. Many women tend to believe they have little sexual drive, so it is easier for GL to see her drive in the form of her husband. But of course, her husband may also depict how she felt about sex in connection with his ‘sexual appetites’.

It is a general rule, however, that our dream process will dramatise into a past life, or a psychic’ experience, emotions linked with trauma or sexual drive which we find difficult to meet in the present.

Example: ‘I dreamt many times I lost my husband, such as not being able to find the car park where he was waiting, and seeing him go off in the distance. I wake in a panic to find him next to me in bed. These dreams persisted, and then he died quite suddenly. He was perfectly healthy at the time of the dreams and I wonder if it was a premonition of me really losing him’ (Mrs AD). Cannot find husband: many middle aged women dream of ‘losing’ their husband while out with him, perhaps shopping, or walking in a town somewhere. Sometimes the dream ponrays him actually killed. Mrs AD wonders if her dream was a premonition.

It is more likely a form of practising the loss, so it does not come as such a shock.

The greatest shocks occur when we have never even considered the event—such as a young child losing its mother, an event it has never practised, not even in fantasy, so has no inbuilt shock absorbers. As most of us know, men tend to die before women, and this information is in the mind of middle-aged married women. Mrs AD may have uncon­sciously observed slight changes in her husband’s body and behaviour, and therefore readied herself.

Other woman’s husband: one’s own husband, feelings about that man, desire for a non-committed relationship with less responsibility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

ILLNESS

If one has painful memories which are never cleared, or feelings of anger or resentment which are held within, these will often be shown in a dream as an illness or infection; a collapse of one’s confidence, or the uprising of fears and depression can also be shown as illness. Also occa­sionally depicts the way we attempt to get love or attention, by being ill; sometimes relates to our actual physical body, but quite rarely; also may show our intuitions about the physical condition of someone else. See infection; body. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

INCUBATION

As can be seen from the entry on hypnosis, the dream process is quite amenable to suggestion and conscious influence.

It is probably most helpful to think of this action as similar to the process of memory. In seeking information from memory we hold a question or idea in consciousness, the resulting associated memories or information being largely spontaneous.

The question held directs what information is taken from the enormous pool of memory.

A question might even call together scattered pieces of information which are then put together into a new composite, a new realisation. So the process is not only recall of existing memory, but also creative. It may also access skills, such as the ability to sub­tract one number from another. Because of these factors our conscious queries can influence the process of dreaming, causing them to respond. As dreams have access to our full memory, our creative potential as well as learnt skills, such response to concerns or queries are often of great value.

To make use of this, first consider the query as fully as possible while awake. Look at it from as many viewpoints as possible, talk it over with others. Make note of the areas that are already clear, and what still remains to be clarified. Just before going to sleep, use imagery to put your question to your unconscious resources. Imagine standing before a circle of gentle light—a symbol of one’s total self—and ask it for the information sought. Then, as if you have asked a question of a wise friend, create a relaxed state as if listening for the consid­ered reply. In most cases, dreams which follow will in some way be a response to what is sought, though not necessarily in the way imagined. See dream process as computer; creativity and problem solving in dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

OBSESSED

We are each obsessed in some degree. Few of us could walk down our road nude, or maybe even without shoes and socks. We take such obsessions for granted and accept them as norms, so we do not feel mentally unbalanced. When a similar power of feeling leads us to behaviour outside the norm we face our own doubts about ourself. Obsession in dreams may illustrate some anxiety, drive or desire which is leading us beyond our accepted norm, or the obsession may be used to escape the real feelings, such as childhood pain, or adult conflict and entrapment.

In past cultures the ideas or fears which obsess us would have been described as an evil spirit or ghost taking over the person. This is because the irrational obsession takes hold of us against our will, so this is quite an accurate image.

The obsessing factor may still appear in present day dreams in the form of a spirit or demon. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

OLD, ANCIENT, ANTIQUE OLD

The past; the different lives we have lived—baby, youth, lover, parent, provider, what is es­tablished and well worn; tradition and wisdom of folklore.

Example: I am standing in a bookshop.

It is a long estab­lished business. As I look at the books I find two which are about the life of Christ. They are leather bound and handwnt- ten—quite ancient. Both seem to me to be about the author’s own inner life. I believe one is written from a religious view­point and the other from a more occult one. I am not attracted to either’ (Bill O). Bill is looking back on past attitudes, one religious, one occult, which had been big parts of his life. Old people: wisdom, mother or father, past experience; traditions; old age, death. Old building: past way of life; former life with family or another person. Old things, furniture: past or out­worn ways of life or activities. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

PENIS

For a man the penis represents more than simply his sexual appetite. It depicts the whole drive of life through his glandular system which develops the body type he has, pre­disposes his body towards male sexual characteristics; brings a cenain creative explosiveness to his personality, creates urges towards fatherhood and loving his woman, with con­nected desires to supply the needs of family if he is emotion­ally healthy.

The positive aspect of the penis/masculinity is for him to demand his woman meets his maleness, his canng aggression, his sexual desire, with her own fiery energy and strength. In general, direct reference to sexual feelings, fears, or problems. As these can be quite complex several examples are given below.

Example: ‘So for the third time I held the woman and made love.

The woman’s vagina was like a flower, I don’t mean to look at, but in physical sensation. My penis felt like it was penetrating petals of flesh and touching with great plea­sure a central receptive area I was left with the feeling of being able to make love again and again without any negative effects. It was a very positive and healthy feeling’ (John T). John is feeling confident about his sexual drive. Although a powerful drive, subtle feelings and fears have an intense influ­ence not only on the pleasure of sex, but also the response of the physical organs.

The relationship with the penis and sex act in one s dream shows what fears, hurts or attitudes are influencing the sexual flow. See castration.

In a woman’s dream, one’s relationship with, desire for, a mate; relationship with one’s own male self—ambition, work capability, aggression, intellect; depicts the relationship with, genital sexuality with, one’s panner. As with Sally in the next example, the events in the dream define the problem or rela­tionship. Example: ‘My lover Terry, myself and another woman are all on our bed.

The other woman seemed very sure of herself and kissed Terry in a very intimate way, he doing the same to her as I lay very near to both of them. Then Terry stuck his bottom in the air and staned to lick my chest and breast. I found myself licking around the penis, felt I was under some kind of pressure from both the other two to do so but didn’t feel too shattered as I did it with love for Terry, but I had a bitter taste in my mouth’ (Sally P). In talking about this dream Sally said she often struggled with what she wanted and what her panner wanted in sex. She might go along with his needs, but not find it palatable. Even if she did do it with some love, it might have a bad taste in her mouth*.

Example: T felt as if I were as one with Terry and I realised he was trying to make a journey into his mother s vagina, as his penis. Her vagina looked like a long dark tunnel and was threatening to him. I said, “You haven’t given your mother satisfaction and you say you will not.” Then he was really smashed up in body. Withdrawing into a garden with a high green hedge. I took a leaf from the hedge and began to pull it apan with my hands. Terry said, “Look what you are doing, teasing me.” I felt withdrawal wasn’t the way and staned to follow him, walking alongside the hedge. I said, “It feels like you are strangling me, so why don’t you do it and kill me?” (We have been going through a lot of sexual withdrawal, Terry saying his sexuality was his to do with as he wanted.)(Sally P). This second dream of Sally’s is a shrewd summing up of Terry’s sexual fears. In fact Terry suffered a great deal of anxi­ety about sex, and later uncovered the son of fear and desire to avoid giving his mother satisfaction in becoming a full blooded man shown in the dream. Our unconscious is a very capable psychologist, and while Terry in Sally’s dream repre­sents her insights regarding him—and must not be seen as a statement of fact about Terry—such insights are often enor­mously useful in dealing with relationship difficulties.

Example: ‘Was in a house with my wife. Outside the door was something which wanted to come into her—an invisible being. We were frightened and it said “Do not be afraid, I want you to put your penis in your wife and wait for me to activate you. In that way you will form a body for me.” I woke and realised the dream was moving me to parenthood. Al­ready having three children I realised this would mean an­other 20 years of responsibility. Nevertheless my wife and I made love. Two weeks later I dreamt my wife was pregnant with a son. In fact nine months later she bore a son’ (Nigel I). In this interesting dream sequence the penis is Nigel’s drive to be a father. See castrate; bed; knob; pole; reptiles; sausage; examples in flower and tunnel. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

PEOPLE

Several people in dream: not feeling lonely; involve­ment of many aspects of oneself in what is being dreamt about; social ability. Large crowds: enormous involvement of self in issue, one’s relationship or feelings about the social environment one lives in; in groups we have a feeling of being looked at or on view—how we relate to that may be depicted by what we are doing in the dream group. See party; roles.

Example: ‘I was outdoors with a group of people acting as leader. We were in the middle of a war situation with bullets playing around us. Maybe aeroplanes were also attacking. I was leading the group from cover to cover, avoiding the bul­lets’ (Paul W). Despite feeling attacked, either by external events, or from inner conflicts, Paul is using leadership skills to deal with his own fears and tendencies.

If a friend told us he had just had an argument with his wife and was going to leave her, we might sit down and counsel them by listening and helping them to son out the hun feelings from their long- term wishes. We might point out they had felt this way before, but it passed—in other words give feedback they had missed. In a similar way, our various emotions and drives often need this son of skill employed by ourself. This unifies us, leading to coping skills as in Paul’s dream.

Example: Walking alone through a small town. I was heading for a place that a group of people, in a street parallel to mine, were also heading for.

A person from the group tried to persuade me that the right way to get to the place was along the street the group was walking. I knew the street did not matter, only the general direction.

The person was quite dis­turbed by my independence. It made him or her feel uncenain co have their leader apparently questioned. I felt uncenain too for a moment’ (Ivor S).

A group of people, as in Ivor’s dream, can also depict how one meets the pressure of social norms. As social relationship is one of the most imponant factors outside personal survival—and survival depends upon it— such dreams help us to clarify our individual contact with society. Human beings have an unconscious but highly devel­oped sense of the psychological social environment. Ivor’s dream shows something we are all involved in—how we are relating to humans collectively. Are we in conflict with group behaviour and direction? Do we conform, but perhaps have conflict with our individual drives? Do we find a way between the opposites? Much of our response is laid down in child­hood and remains unconscious unless we review it.

In some dreams, a group of people represent what is meant by the word God. This may sound unlikely, but the uncon­scious, because it is highly capable of synthesis, often looks at humanity as a whole. Collectively humanity has vast creative and destructive powers which intimately affect us as individu­als. Collectively it has performed miracles which, looked at as an individual, appear impossible. How could a little human being build the Great Pyramid, or a space shuttle? The Bible echoes this concept in such phrases as Whatever you do to the least of one of these, you do to me. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

RED

Example: ‘An old woman with a very pink, lined face, and wearing a clashing red hat, knelt close to my face.

The woman leaned forward to poke my hand, and I recoiled, screaming myself awake (Joy S). Even where red appears quite casually in a dream, as with the hat in the example, there is frequently fear, screaming, horror or a sense of danger in the same dream. Less frequently, red represents blood, menstruation; the biological life force; conception; death. Red face: anger; high emotion. Red bnck building : homeliness, warmth. Red furniture or decor plush; richness. Red flowers: love, passion, dangers of passion. Red clothes or motif: sexu­ality, passion; strong emotions. Red and grey together : emo­tions connected with depression. Rose pink, love. Pale pink: baby feelings; weakness. Idioms: see red; in the red; red car­pet; red light district; red faced. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

RELIGION AND DREAMS

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

ROAD

One’s prevailing direction in or approach to life. This direction/approach can be either self created out of one’s own actions or decisions or arise out of other people’s or social influence; one’s predispositions; any direction you are taking, such as a love affair, a business, a new attitude; one’s public activities.

Example: My dream is of an eternal journey, which takes a road that turns into a circle or maze that is endless. Behind me is a large fat young man with blond hair. I can’t get along and he catches up with me, I say “We can’t go back we must struggle on.” He takes my wrist. I am trying to hide my fear of him and the pathway, when I wake up’ (JP). JP feels her life is something she must ‘struggle on’ with, but it is an endless circle of confusion in which she gets nowhere. This illustrates the road as a symbol of one’s approach to life. Perhaps it is her fear which creates this sense of life for her.

Example: ‘Janet my wife was cycling beside me. We came to the end of a short road. I said we should turn left, but Janet thought we ought to turn right. We got out into the middle of the road without turning either way’ (Arthur P). Crossroads, deciding which road to take: Arthur’s dream shows crossroads as depicting our many choices. Arthur’s choice involves his attempt to include his wife’s needs.

The size, richness, clean­liness, amount of people, situation of the road shows how you inwardly see either the direction chosen, or the choices con­fronting you. See crossroads.

Example: ‘Walking alone along a road through a small town. I was heading for a place that a group of people, in a street parallel to mine, were also heading for.

A person from the group tried to persuade me that the right way to get to the place was along the street the group was walking. I knew the street did not matter, only the general direction.

The person was quite disturbed by my independence. It made him or her feel uncertain to have their leader apparently questioned. I felt uncertain too for a moment. Then I walked on and came to an open stretch of ground’ (Tony C). Tony’s dream shows how roads can represent different sorts of social behaviour.

To choose one’s individual ‘road’ may be difficult, because others are so sure they know best. Patterns of behaviour such as needing an authority figure to follow are also here depicted as a road.

Road behind: the past; what you have already achieved or done. Road ahead: the future; aspects of self not yet expressed; new areas of endeavour. Fork in road: something to decide; parting from accustomed way or relationship. Unpaved road, track off to one side: going off the beaten track or being side­tracked. Lane: individual direction. Known road: one’s associ­ated feelings with that road. Running out into road: danger. Going wrong way up one way street: going against prevailing attitudes. Going out from house into road: how others see you; being in public view. Idioms: on the road to recovery, road hog; end of the road; take to the road, middle of the road; the high road to. See track. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

SCHOOL

The learning process; what we leamt at school—not lessons but interrelationships, class structure, competitive­ness, authority, mortification, group preferences, etc.; habits of behaviour or feeling reactions developed during those years— puberty occurs at this time, and confronts us with many new feelings, choices and drives. Schoolfriend: your own attitudes developed in school, as you are meeting’ them in the present. School clothes: social attitudes or moral rules leamt at school.

Example: ‘1 am back at school on the first day of the new school year. At this point it can vary slightly, but I always feel out of place, usually because I am older than the other girls now or—most common—because my uniform is incorrect and it is time for assembly—I went to a very strict convent school. There is always some feeling of panic and quite often loneliness’ (PH). PH is still uncomfortable about who she is as a person.

The influence of the school years still nags at her, that she ought to be other than she is. Not having a nature that easily conformed, she was led to feel isolated and an alien.

Places in school: particular abilities we have. Library, our knowledge and learning ability; stored information. Gymna­sium: taking risks in learning something new; daring; physical health. Classroom: study, relationship with authority.

Example: ‘In the bathroom area, a school class was being held, so I had to wait for my bath, steam would be bad for the books. I didn’t have any soap with me but I was going to wash my hair and could use the shampoo’ (Leonie K). Leonie is getting rid of attitudes or a self image developed at school, shown as shampooing her hair.

The new attitudes of letting off steam would not have been acceptable at school.

Idioms: of the old school; tell tales out of school, old school tie; well schooled. See schoolteacher under roles. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

SUITCASE

Example: ‘In last night’s dream the baby I dream about incessantly had been locked in a suitcase but was quite unscathed when taken out, except that it was very dirty, but still not crying. I do not have any memories in connection with these babies and the only feelings I have are those of remorse that I have neglected the baby. I have had four chil­dren of my own, none of whom were ever neglected in this way’ (Mrs C). Mrs C uses the suitcase in at least two ways. One is her womb, or reproductive ability. Although she has had four children, this does not stop her unconsciously desir­ing more.

The second is what ‘luggage’—emotional feelings, urges, thoughts—she carries.

Generally, it depicts the womb, what one carries inside oneself, such as longings, attitudes, fears; how we see ourself socially—the luggage might be a sign of status, how we rate ourself; also a symbol of independence or going somewhere.

See bag. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

THE SELF

Our conscious self or ego is only a tiny pan of our totality, as is obvious when we consider how much of our memory or experience we can hold in mind at any one time.

The self, as defined by Jung, is both what we are consciously aware of, and the massive potential remaining unconscious.

The self has no known boundaries, for we do not yet know the end of what the mind is capable of, or what consciousness touches out of sight of waking.

The mass of experience and awareness which lies in the background of our waking aware­ness is like an inner guiding factor which, apart from express­ing precise pieces in the form of remembered facts and events, guides us, if we listen, through intuition, feeling states, dreams or illumination. Its symbols are: a ring, a square area, a great tree, Christ, a shining being or animal, a talking animal, a strange stone or rock, symbols like the cross or mandala, a round table, God, a guru, an elephant, a crowned or shining snake. Here are some examples of the self in dreams.

Example: ‘1 am climbing a tree to get a stone. This stone has special powers that flower. I’m nearly there when I look down and notice that there aren’t any branches on the left side of the tree. This causes me to consider the possibility of falling and that in turn leads to a fear of climbing any higher. I wake with my heart beating strongly, but little feeling of fear.’ Example: 41 lopk into the third square, it was filled with an iridescent blue colour, shining and beautiful to look at, a beautiful substance. I felt it had to do with religion, but I couldn’t quite grasp it.1 Example: ‘I was in a small town with a group of men. We were standing in a small square praying. As I prayed I realised I could fly.’

Awareness of what the self holds is important. It contains what is our own personal wisdom and insight regarding life in general and particular.

It is not full of creeds and dogmas and conflict as are organised attempts to express the spiritual. But it does have its dark side.

To grasp the stone with special powers, understand the significance of the iridescent blue square, or find real uplift in prayer as these dreams depict, we need a clear rational mind which allows intuition and feeling but is not relinquished or lost in the immensity of the self. Touching the vastness of our being we may feel ourself to be vast, all knowing, a guru. In this state, Jung says, a person loses all sense of humour and drops ordinary human contacts. Functionally what happens is that as a defence against meet­ing our pain and childhood trauma as we enter this vast store­house of our being, as a way of escaping the self responsibility for our condition, one might fly off into feelings of loving all things, of knowing the mystery of it all, of being the Buddha.

The problem is that while it might be true we are in essence the Christ, or have wisdom, these realisations are distorted by the undealt-with childhood traumas and longings. See aura; mandala. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

VAGINA

The vagina refers to much more than a woman’s sex­ual feelings and drives. It depicts the urges and processes of her being which are the foundations of her waking personal­ity.

The ability to procreate; the glandular bias which connects with what the conscious personality faces in emotional, mental and physical disposition; the caring, nurturing feelings which emerge out of sexual mating when healthy; the desire for a mate; the sense of connection and identity with other women, other female creatures and female aspects of nature. In its positive aspect it may represent the sure confidence with which a woman may demand from her man that he treat her womanhood with the respect it deserves. This means meeting the full flood of her sexual need with its desire for a child, a caring and supportive nest to rear that child in, and her fe­male creativity which may rise from ihat basic reproductive drive into other social creativity and personal demand for re­spect.

Example: He was very brown, could have been a native but he didn’t feel strange to me. We were making love, I was very aware of the pleasure in my lower body. It was very slippy slidy and wet, there was enjoyment for both of us. Very intense body feelings with a childlike quality, not passion— but pleasure and joy in my vagina’ (Susy I). Susy is feeling happy and joyful about her ‘native’ or natural sexual feelings —particularly the sensual side of sex. Sensual pleasure, as with emotional pleasure, is as much a food for our physical and emotional self as bread is for our physical body.

In a woman’s dream, generally how one feels about one’s own sexual needs, but this includes procreation as well; the health or feeling state of the sexual self and physical vagina; her central femininity; sexual urge; ability to have a child; concept of her physical attraction; temple or church of life, one’s experience of motherhood or experience of the procrea- tive relationship with one’s mother. Example: ‘I had very little pubic hair and thought it must be because I had just had a shower, but, no, on looking again I had very little hair. I was hugging Mary (a friend), my arms around her back and one hand holding her vagina. It was then I noticed she was the shape of a man there. I drew away for a second at the discov­ery then felt OK as it meant I was hugging a male/female person. We were very warm together.

(Two days before this dream my husband had said his mother called a vagina a Mary.)(Lucy R). Lucy is ‘touching’ or becoming aware of what could be seen as her own wholeness, which includes her male nature.

In male dreams: the vagina represents one’s feelings or fears about meeting a woman’s full sexuality, the deep experi­ence of the relationship with one’s mother, binh and how mother met one’s emerging male sexuality; one’s desire for sexual expression. Bleeding vagina: his trauma, fears about a woman and sex. Example: ‘She was now quite naked, dead and stiff, but still bleeding from the vagina. I walked along, the dead body walked like a clockwork soldier. It was quite hornble to see its semblance to life’ (Derek A). Derek’s rela­tionship with a woman, and with his own emotions and sexu­ality, is dead’ and deeply hun—the blood. He can mechani­cally have sex—the clockwork soldier—but not with deep feeling bonds or satisfaction. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

CHEESE

Property and prosperity. Or something is not quite right, or something is going to waste. See Milk, Butter.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

COUNTERFEIT MONEY

Dishonesty and pretense. Your values are too materialistic. Fear of poverty, similar to Charity, Asylum, and Beggar, however not as intense. Here, it is rather a case of not quite trusting your assets.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

DAWN

A new beginning, energy, and youth. Postponing something until tomorrow. You are either waiting to see, or you are simply too lazy to do what you feel you need to do, but this can sometimes be quite proper and healing.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

JOKE / JEST

A joke works because it shows situations in a new perspective. Perhaps you should re-examine your rigid perspective. Don’t take life quite so seriously, and let the soul be a source of joy.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

SUBURBS

Not being quite inside and not quite outside. Boredom.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

TWILIGHT

Romance, a transitional period. One is standing between two worlds and is not quite sure. Twilight indicates a moment of transition, in which everything seems undefined and undecided. Dusk is connected to fears, but in part it is also a symbol for new beginnings, curiosity (what does the new day have in store?) and openness. Morning sunrise and evening sunset are times of pleasure. See Red.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

ARMS

also see Body and Weapons

1- We use our arms in all sorts of different ways, and in dreams it is often significant to note what is actually taking place. We may be defending ourselves, fighting, being held or acknowledging.

2- Arms in the sense of weapons are used to protect and defend. In olden times, there were quite a series of rituals to do with the Page becoming the Knight and making the transit from the arms-bearer to the user.

3- The arm signifies surrender, wisdom, or action.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

BEHIND

1- To be behind someone in a dream indicates that on a subconscious level we may consider ourselves to be inferior in some way.

2- We may find we have a fear of being left behind.

3- We should look at our spiritual standing as we may, quite literally; be behind in our search for wholeness.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

BIRDS

1- Birds in dreams usually represent freedom, imagination, thoughts and ideas which, by nature, need freedom to be able to become evident. As far back as Pagan times, man has been fascinated by birds and by flight. Birds were believed to be vehicles for the soul and to have the ability to carry the soul to heaven. As a result, birds were very often invested with magical and mystical powers.

2- Psychologically man often needs to project human qualities onto objects outside himself, and because birds’ conduct is entirely instinctive, they can be used in dreams to understand man’s behaviour.

3- Birds have come to represent the Soul both its dark and its enlightened side.

A caged bird can indicate restraint or entrapment.

A bird flying freely represents aspirations and desires and possibly the spirit soaring towards the Divine.

A display of plumage indicates the dreamer’s facade the way the individual sees him- or herself.

A flock of birds containing both winged and plucked birds indicates confusion over bodilv or material considerations as opposed to Spiritual aspirations. Birds can sometimes denote the feminine, free side of the being.

The golden-winged bird has the same significance as fire and therefore indicates spiritual aspirations.

A high-flying bird Spiritual awareness or that part in us which seeks knowledge. In a man’s dream, a bird can represent the Anima (see Introduction). In a woman’s dream, it suggests the Self, in the sense of the Spiritual Self (see Introduction).

White/Black birds The two aspects of the Anima or Self (see Introduction) may be represented as two opposites.

The black bird signifies the dark, neglected or shadowy side, the white the open, clear, free side.

A pet bird Personal circumstances and emotions can have a profound effect on our self- management, and remembered happiness can be experienced in dreams about pet birds. Chicken The imagination is being used to serve a practical function. There is potential for growth, though this may also come about through belonging to a group.

The chicken can also represent stupidity and cowardice. Cock The cock is the symbol of a new day and of vigilance or watchfulness. It represents the masculine principle and thus the need to be more upfront and courageous.

Crow Dreaming of a crow can have two meanings. Traditionally the crow warns of death but may also represent wisdom and deviousness.

Cuckoo The meaning of the cuckoo is ambivalent, since it can represent deviousness or unrequited love. As the herald of spring it indicates a change from old, stale energy to newness and freshness.

Dove The Anima (see Introduction).

The bringer of calm after the storm, the Soul, the peaceful side of man’s nature appears in dreams as the dove.

Duck In a dream this can often denote some kind of superficiality or childishness.

Eagle Because the eagle is known to be a bird of prey; in dreams it signifies domination and supremacy. It can equally also mean perccptiveness and awareness as well as farsightedness and objectivity.

If the dreamer identifies with the eagle, his own wish to dominate is becoming apparent though there may be some difficulty in reconciling other parts of the dreamer’s nature.

If the dreamer feels threatened, somebody else may be threatening the status quo.

Falcon The falcon shares the symbolism of the eagle. As a bird of prey, it typifies freedom and hope for those who are being restricted in any way. It can represent victory over lust. Goose/Geese The goose is said to represent watchfulness and love. Like the swan it can represent the dawn or new life.

A flock of geese is often taken to represent the powers of intuition and to give warning of disaster. Wild goose The wild goose can represent the soul and often dcpicts the Pagan side of our nature. Geese, in common with cats, are considered to be witches’ familiars. Hen The hen denotes providence, maternal care and procreation. When a hen crows in a dream it is taken to represent feminine domination.

Ibis The ibis, sometimes taken to be the stork, is the symbol of perseverance and of aspiration. Jackdaw - see Magpie. Kingfisher To dream of a king- lishcr is to dream of dignity and calmness.

Lark A lark is traditionally supposed to represent the transcendence of the mundane. Magpie/Jackdaw Because of the belief that magpies and jackdaws are thieves, to dream of one may indicate that an associate is attempting to take away something that the dreamer values. Also the magpie can signify good news. Ostrich The ostrich denotes that one is attempting to run away from responsibility. Owl The owl is sacrcd to Athena, goddess of strategy and wisdom, therefore in a dream the owl can describe those qualities. Because it is also associated with the night-time, it can sometimes represent death.

Peacock To see a peacock in a dream indicates a growth of understanding from the plain and unadorned to the beauty of the fully plumed bird. Like the phoenix, it represents rebirth and resurrection.

Pelican There are two meanings to the symbolism of the pelican. One is sacrifice and devotion and the other is careful and maternal love.

Penguin The penguin is thought to represent adaptability but also possibly stupidity. Pheasant To dream of pheasants generally foretells prosperity and good fortune to come. Phoenix The phoenix is a universal symbol of rebirth, resurrection and immortality (dying in order to live). Quail The quail represents amorousness, sometimes courage and often good luck. In its negative form it can also represent witchcraft and sorcery.

Raven The raven can be a symbol of sin, but if it is seen to be talking it often represents prophecy. Its meaning can be ambivalent since it can represent evil, but also wisdom. Seagull flic seagull is a symbol of freedom and power. Sparrow “flic sparrow represents business and industrv.

Stork

The stork is a symbol of new life and new beginnings.

Swallow

The swallow seen in a dream represents hope and the coming of Spring. Swan The swan is the soul of man and is often taken to be the divine bird. It can sometimes denote a peaceful death. Turkey The turkey is traditionally a food for celebrations and festivals.

To dream of it can therefore denote that there may be good times ahead. Vulture/Buzzard The vulture is a scavenger and therefore has an association with the feminine aspect in its destructive persona. Woodpecker The woodpcckcr is a guardian of both kings and trees in mythology.

It is also reputed to have magical powers.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

DAWN

1- To dream of a dawn or a new day represents a new beginning or a new awareness in circumstances around us. We are looking for different ways of dealing with old situations.

2- Psychologically we are aware of the passage of time, and perhaps the need to mark or celebrate this in some way.

3- A new dawn can bring a great sense of hope. As the new dawn fades that sense of hope grows stronger.

A form of spiritual illumination is quite often felt within this type of dream.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

EJACULATION

also see Sex

1- The dreamer’s attitude to sex often becomes apparent in dreams through the sexual act, and to ejaculate in a dream may be an effort to understand negative feelings. It could also simply be indicative of the need for release, and the satisfaction of sexual needs.

2- The act of ejaculation may be the giving up of old fears and doubts about oneself and one’s sexual prowess.

3- Ejaculation, quite literally, may- signify a loss of power or ‘the little death’.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

FIGHT

1- If we dream that we arc in a fight, it usually indicates that we are confronting our need for independence. We may also need to express our anger and frustration and the subconscious desire to hurt a part of ourselves. We also may wish to hurt someone else, although this would be unacceptable in the waking state

2- To fight back is a natural defence mechanism, so when we are feeling threatened in our everyday lives, we will often dream of taking that situation one stage further and fighting it out.

3- Quite literally a spiritual conflict.

The dreamer should try to work out where, and why, there is a conflict and perhaps deal with it in a more subtle way than with ‘all guns blazing’.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

FIREWORKS

1- Fireworks are generally accepted as belonging to a happy occasion or celebration, though they may also be frightening. When we dream of fireworks we are hoping to be able to celebrate good fortune, although there may be a secondary emotion associated with that celebration.

2- Fireworks can have the same significance as an explosion.

A release of energy or emotion can have quite a spectacular effect on us, or on people around us.

3- There is an excess of spiritual emotion which needs to be channelled properly in order to prevent it shooting off in all directions.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

FLOCK

1- To dream of a flock for instance of birds or sheep is to recognise the need to belong to a group, to have a common aim or way of being.

2- When we dream of belonging to a group, our personal behaviour can quite often be different from that of others, and we may be alerted to this by dreaming of a flock.

3- A flock can be symbolic of our spiritual beliefs, and our faith in that what we are following is the correct path.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

GOBLET

1- In dreams the goblet has similar significance to the chalice (See Chalice). It represents the feminine, receptive principal and our ability to achieve enjoyment in different ways. We may be able to make a celebration out of something that is quite ordinary.

To be drinking from a goblet indicates allowing ourselves the freedom to enjoy life to the full.

2- To dream of a set of goblets as in wine glasses indicates several different ways in which we can make our lives enjoyable and fun.

3- “flic feminine principal.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

GRAVE

also see Death

1- Dreaming of a grave is an indication that we must have regard for our feelings about, or our concept of, death. Such a dream may also be attempting to deal with our feelings about someone who has died.

2- Part of our personality may, quite literally, have been killed ofT, or is dead and buried to the outside world.

3- Spiritually, we may fear not just physical death but also its consequences.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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