seventeen

The meaning of Seventeen in dream | Dream interpretation


The number seventeen symbolizes the soul.

My Dream Interpretation | myjellybean

To dream of the number seventeen symbolizes the soul.

Dream Symbols and Analysis | DreamForth


Seventeen | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Seventeen


THUNDER

(Curse; Omen; Policeman; Warning sign) In a dream, thunder without rain means a scare, a warning or an ultimatum. It also represents good promises, gracious orders, or the sound of drums. Seeing thunder in a dream means repayment of one’s debts, and for a sick person, it means recovering from his illness. Thunder, lightening and rain in a dream represent fear for a traveller, or the greed of a merchant. Hearing about an awesome blast in a distant land in a dream means that the dwellers of that place will be struck with a major calamity or sudden mass casualties.

The sound of thunder in a dream represents a murder, a fight, a dispute, an argument, lack of religious attendance, loss of money, or the release of a prisoner. Athunderstorm with rain when needed in a dream represents a good harvest for that year. Hearing a thunderous sky without seeing the lightening in a dream means an assassination, deception, falsehood or slander. Hearing the sound of thunder in a dream also means being reprimanded by a higher authority. There are no benefits in hearing the sound of thunder in the darkness without seeing lightening in the dream, this would be interpreted as apostasy or disloyalty. This can be particularly true when it is accompanied with an earthquake.

If one hears thunder in its season in a dream, it means good news and blessings. Otherwise, out of its usual season, thunder in a dream represents an army on the move, or a foreign occupation of a country. Hearing the sound of thunder in a dream also represents hymns, praising God Almighty, glorifying Him, or it could mean a sickness, fear, deafness, or the sound of drums in a wedding.

If the one seeing the dream is an atheist, it means that he will be guided and have faith in God Almighty.

If he is a sinner, it means that he will repent for his sins. Hearing the roaring of thunder in a dream on the first day of October means death. Ifit is heard during the first six days of that month, it means benefits, or lower prices, but if it is heard near the end of the month, then it means a plague or a disaster. Hearing the sound of thunder at any other time during the month of October in a dream means evil.

If it is heard during the month of November in a dream, it means blessings for the land, prosperity, the spreading of God’s words in a new land, the falling of a comet in a populated area, the death of a leader, a pollution that will devastate bird life, or a heavy rainstorm with limited damages. Ifthe sound of thunder is heard during the first ten days of December in a dream, it means the death of famous people within the Western hemisphere, inflation, rising prices, degradation of social behavior, decrease in harvest, inflation, or playing dirty politics. Hearing the sound of thunder during the last seven days of December in a dream means that the winter will be cold and dry, though the 4;Jo forthcoming springwill be cooland wet. Hearing the sound ofthunder in the first six days of the month ofJanuary in a dream means that a major event will take place, such as an earthquake, death, destruction, or a war in Iraq. Ifthis dream is witnessed during the last week of the month of January, then it represents a solar eclipse, or the death of a Western leader, a plague, or the birth of a planet that signifies the destruction of a great city on earth. Hearing the sound of thunder on the first day ofFebruary in a dream means a good harvest, lowering or stabilization of prices, discovering a new disease in the East, death in the seas, heavy rains in Mecca, fear, devastation and famines in Ethiopia, or that a Western leader will move his armies to the East and control the land for a short period of time. Hearing the sound of thunder during the first six days of March in a dream means good harvest, lowering of prices, stabilization of the market and prosperity. Hearing the sound of thunder at the end of March in a dream means famines, destruction, or that a swarm oflocusts may devastate the lands, or it could mean a drought that will kill African cattle. Also in this type of dreams, ifthe sound ofthunder is heard on the twenty first day ofApril, it means that Western armies will drive East and establish military bases there.

If the first of April happens to be a Sunday, then March will be a month of great fear and disturbances in the East, meanwhile, a conflict between the Western armies will end by the death of a Western leader and the defeat of his army. Ifthe dream is seen on the eleventh day of April, it may mean that earthquakes or cyclones will devastate many countries.

If the dream takes place on the thirteenth day of April, then it means that inflation will strike and price hiking will burden the common people. Ifthe dream is seen on the seventeenth day of April, it purports a major political dispute between the leaders of the world, and if it is seen on the twenty second day of April, it means that a disastrous evil will contaminate many societies.

If the dream takes place on the twenty third day of the month of April, it means abundance, falling prices, fertility in the lands, while if it is seen on the twenty fifth day of April, it will mean price hiking.

If it is seen on the twenty ninth day of April, it means that blessings, fertility, relief and joy will spread in the land.

If the sound of thunder is heard during the first nine days of the month of May in a dream, it means the death of noble and leading people in Turkey. During that period, rain will be in abundance, the land will be fertile and the farms most productive.

If the dream takes place between the tenth and the twentieth day of the month ofMay, it means plagues. Ifthe sound of thunder is heard in a dream during the first ten days of June, it means the death of renowned scholars, people of knowledge, religious leaders, or noble people in Egypt. Meanwhile, prices will fall, and abundance will ease the economy into a major economic turnaround.

If the dream is seen during the first six days of July, it means that good rain will fall during the following December and that the land will be fertile. During that year, several Western leaders will die, and a war may take place in Persia. Meanwhile, evil will spread throughout Egypt, and it will be brought about by its own leaders. Ifthe dream takes place during the last seven days of July, it means that peace will spread throughout the earth, prices will fall in Iraq and in East Africa, and a new disease will affect fruit trees, banana trees, date trees, though wheat will be available in abundance, even if the farmers were concerned about it in the early part of the year.

If the sound of thunder is heard during the month of August in a dream, it means blessings for the people in Syria and the people of Azerbaijan on the Caspian Sea. At that time, sea passages will be blockaded, the highways will be forsaken and a war may take place in China.

If the sound of thunder is heard at the end of the month of August in a dream, it means the end of a drought in Egypt, rising prices, death, earthquakes, or major political changes. Ifthe sound of thunder is heard during the first eight days of September in a dream, it . announces a drought during the early part of the year that will be followed by heavy rains and results in a good harvest. It also means that a long and destructive war will take place.

If the thunder takes place on the tenth day of September in one’s dream, then it means a drought in Morocco. God knows best what He has reserved for His creation and He is the best of judges.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

DOUBLE DIGITS

In Tarot and in dreams, the significance of numbers does not stop at ten. In most cases, the number can be reduced to a single digit number as described above, but certain numbers have additional associations. Eleven is associated with the power of the intellect and the Tarot card Strength. It stands for intuition, mastery in a particular domain, spirituality, enlightenment and capacity to achieve.

Eleven is also traditionally a symbol of transgression, as it goes beyond the law, represented by ten. St Augustine called eleven ‘the coat of arms of sin’. Eleven can also suggest anxieties about a deadline, as in ‘the eleventh hour’.

Twelve has a spiritual significance because of the Jesus’ twelve disciples and in dreams it may represent a revelation of truth. There are also twelve months in a year, so the number twelve in a dream may be urging you to enjoy your success and prepare for the future. Twelve is the number of the Hangman, a Tarot card symbolizing the sacrifice of ego, or new outlooks and perspectives.

Thirteen is traditionally an unlucky number and it may cause anxiety if you are superstitious. But it is also a symbol of optimism, completeness and new hope. For Mexicans, thirteen is a lucky number since their Pre-Colombian ancestors worshipped thirteen gods and thirteen heavenly bodies. Thirteen is the number of the Death card in a Tarot reading and it represents transition and rebirth. In dreams, thirteen is a paradoxical number meaning death and birth, end and beginning, and change and transition. It is symbolic of obstacles standing in your way that you must overcome to achieve your goals.

Fourteen is associated with the Tarot card Temperance, representing balance, harmony and equilibrium; it signifies the unexpected and your need to adapt to ever-changing circumstances. It is also symbolic of over-indulgence and giving in to your desires. Fifteen is the number of the Devil, a Tarot card symbolizing the need to resist temptation or break free from restrictions. The number sixteen is linked to the Tower, a Tarot card that suggests a struggle for freedom; it also symbolizes innocence, vulnerability, tenderness, destruction of the old and the birth of the new. Seventeen represents the Star, or renewed hope, in a Tarot deck; eighteen is the number of the Moon in the Tarot deck, which warns against illusion and confusion; it also warns against treachery, deception and lies; nineteen denotes the Sun, a symbol of success and happiness in the Tarot deck; it indicates independence and the overcoming of personal struggles. You will find that you often have to stand up for yourself.

Twenty is associated with Judgment; a Tarot card of assessment and new beginnings and twenty-one represents the World, in a Tarot deck, a symbol of unity. According to numerologists the number Twenty-one represents a turning point in your life. It is also associated with the responsibilities to which you need to own up. Twenty-two denotes mental powers and knowledge. It also indicates that you are goal-oriented and practical. The number twenty-four symbolizes rewards, happiness, love, money, success and creativity. Twenty-six symbolizes the earth, and the law of cause and effect. Thirty-three is a symbol of personal and spiritual growth. The number thirty-nine symbolizes understanding and thoughtfulness. Forty denotes a period of cleansing, preparation and growth.

Forty-four refers to a sacred union or divine marriage. Fifty stands for all that is sacred in your life. Sixty is associated with time. It may refer to time running out or longevity.

Generally, rather than sending an archetypal or symbolic message, double digits in your dreams may also have been referring to your age, or the passing of time or times in your life from which you can draw inspiration or from which you are reluctant to depart.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

WHAT DREAMS CAN DO FOR YOU

Your dream world is an invisible but extremely powerful inner resouce, one that you can learn to access freely. You can learn to command and control your dreams, thereby enriching your life immeasurably.

Once upon a time not so long ago, an inventor was struggling with a major problem. His name was Elias Howe, and for years he had been trying to solve this problem, so that he could complete a machine he was building—a machine that would in time change the world. He was missing a small but vital detail, and, try as he would, he just couldn’t figure it out. Needless to say, Howe was a very frustrated man. One night, after another long day of fruitless work on his project, he dreamed he had been captured by fierce savages. These warriors were attacking him with spears. Although in the dream he was terrified he would be killed, he noticed that the spears were unusual looking: each one had an eye- shaped hole at the pointed end. When Howe woke up, it hit him like a brick: he had actually dreamed the answer to his problem. His nightmare was a blessing in disguise. He immediately saw that the eye of the spear could be an eye in a sewing needle, near its point. Elated with the discovery, he rushed to his laboratory and finished the design of his invention: the sewing machine. The rest, as they say, is history.

The list of what dreams can do for you seems endless. We’ve touched on a few of these benefits of dreaming in the preface and introduction. Now let’s go into a bit more detail. I want you to get really excited about your own dream potential. And, once you realize the possibilities, I think you will.

FAMOUS DREAMERS

The history of dreams is filled with stories of famous people who have called on their dreams for help, or who have received help unexpectedly from their dreams. Here are a few more interesting stories to illustrate the point:

The physicist Niels Bohr, who developed the theory of the movements of electrons, had a dream in which he saw the planets attached to the sun by strings. This image inspired him to finalize his theory.

The great Albert Einstein reported that the famous theory of relativity came to him while he was napping—a good reason for taking frequent naps!

Author Richard Bach, who wrote the bestseller Jonathan Livingston Seagull, was stuck in a writer’s block after writing the first half of his now-famous novel. It was eight years later that he literally dreamed the second half and was able to complete his book.

Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman told reporters that his classic film Cries and Whispers had been inspired by a dream.

Another writer, the well-loved British author Robert Louis Stevenson, was quite dependent on his dreams for ideas that he could turn into sellable stories. Stevenson has related in his memoirs that after a childhood tortured by nightmares, and his successful efforts to overcome them, he was able to put his dreams to work for profit.

A born storyteller (though he started out as a medical student), he was accustomed to lull himself to sleep by making up stories to amuse himself. Eventually, he turned this personal hobby into a profession, becoming a writer of tales like Treasure Island. He identified his dream-helpers as “little people,” or “Brownies.” Once he was in constant contact with this inner source, his nightmares vanished, never to return. Instead, whenever he was in need of income he turned to his dreams:

At once the little people begin to bestir themselves in the same quest, and labour all night long, and all night long set before him truncheons of tales upon their lighted theatre. No fear of his being frightened now; the flying heart and the frozen scalp are things bygone; applause, growing applause, growing interest, growing exultation in his own cleverness . . . and at last a jubilant leap to wakefulness, with the cry, “I have it, that’ll do!”

Stevenson wrote his autobiography in the third person, not revealing that he was the subject until the end.

Stevenson further states that sometimes when he examined the story his Brownies had provided, he was disappointed, finding it unmarketable. However, he also reported that the Brownies “did him honest service and gave him better tales than he could fashion for himself,” that “they can tell him a story piece by piece, like a serial, and keep him all the while in ignorance of where they aim.”

Stevenson’s Brownies are a perfect example of dream helpers just waiting to be called upon. A particularly famous example of the work of Stevenson’s Brownies is the tale The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. As he explains:

I had long been trying to write a story on this subject, to find a body, a vehicle, for that strong sense of man’s double being, which must at times come in upon and overwhelm the mind of every thinking creature. [After he destroyed an earlier version of the manuscript . . .] For two days I went about racking my brains for a plot of any sort; and on the second night I dreamed the scene at the window, and a scene afterwards split in two, in which Hyde, pursued for some crime, took the powder and underwent the change in the presence of his pursuers. All the rest was made awake, and consciously, although I think I can trace in much of it the manner of my Brownies.

Although Stevenson did the “mechanical work, which is about the worst of it,” writing out the tales with pen and paper, mailing off the stories to publishers, paying the postage, and not incidentally collecting the fees, he gave his Brownies almost total credit for his productions.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, a British poet, was accustomed to taking a sedative derived from opium (legal in those days). One afternoon after taking a dose he was reading and fell asleep over his book. The last words he read had been, “Here the Khan Kubla commanded a palace to be built.” When Coleridge awoke some three hours later he had dreamed hundreds of lines of poetry, which he immediately set to writing down. The opening lines of this poem—one of the most famous of all time—are:

  • In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
    A stately pleasure-dome decree:
    Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
    Through caverns measureless to man
    Down to a sunless sea.

Unfortunately for posterity, after writing only fifty-four lines of the two to three hundred he had dreamed, Coleridge was interrupted by a caller, whom he entertained for an hour. When he returned to complete the poem, he had lost all the rest of what he had dreamed! In his diary he noted that it had disappeared “like images on the surface of a stream.” Even so, he had written a masterpiece. This true story, however, emphasizes the need to record dreams upon awakening, a subject we will take up in chapters 5 and 6.

Not only artists and writers give their dreams credit for their ideas and inspirations, but many scientists as well (as we saw in the examples of Bohr and Einstein). Psychologist Eliot D. Hutchinson reports numerous cases of scientists receiving information through dreams and says of dreams that “by them we can see more clearly the specific mechanism of intuitive thought,” and that “a large number of thinkers with whom I have had direct contact admit that they dream more or less constantly about their work, especially if it is exceptionally baffling . . . they often extract useful conceptions.”

I personally can attest to this statement, as it mirrors my own experience writing books. For example, when I began work on this book about dreams, I noticed that my dream production immediately doubled; and I have had Stevenson’s experience of “little people,” whom I call my “elves,” and whom I write about extensively in my book for teens called Teen Astrology, telling about how they came to my rescue when I was quite stuck (see chapter 9, pages 249– 252 in that book).

One of the most astonishing as well as fascinating stories is that of Hermann V. Hilprecht, a professor of Assyrian at the University of Pennsylvania in the late 1800s. It seems to be a characteristic of those who receive dream help that they have recently been working long and hard and are frustrated. In Hilprecht’s case, he was working late one evening in 1893, attempting to decipher the cuneiform characters on drawings of two small fragments of agate. He thought they belonged to Babylonian finger rings, and he had tentatively assigned one fragment to the so-called Cassite period of 1700 B.C.E. However, he couldn’t classify the second fragment. And he wasn’t at all sure about the first either. He finally gave up his efforts at about midnight and went straight to bed—and had the following dream, which was his “astounding discovery.”

Hilprecht dreamed of a priest of pre-Christian Nippur, several thousand years ago, who led the professor into the treasure chamber of the temple and showed him the originals, telling him just how the fragments fitted in, all in great detail. Although the dream was long and involved, Hilprecht remembered it all and in the morning told it to his wife. In his words: “Next morning . . . I examined the fragments once more in the light of these disclosures, and to my astonishment found all the details of the dream precisely verified in so far as the means of verification were in my hands.”

Up until then, Hilprecht had been working only with drawings. Now he traveled to the museum in Constantinople where the actual agate fragments were kept and discovered that they fitted together perfectly, unlocking the secret of a three-thousand-year-old mystery by means of a dream!

How did this happen? Clairvoyance? Magic? Who was the priest? How was it that Hilprecht seemed to make contact in a dream with someone who had lived so long before him? We will never know the answers to these questions; but we do know from the professor’s own words that this is exactly what happened to him. (It makes you wonder whether Professor Hilprecht was in the habit of paying attention to his dreams!)

No doubt one of the most famous dream sources of scientific discovery was experienced by the German chemist Friedrich August Kekulé, when he was attempting to understand and model the molecular structure of benzene. Like Professor Hilprecht, Kekulé had been searching for the answer for many years and was totally immersed in the problem. He told of a dream he had while he napped in front of his fireplace one frigid night in 1865:

Again the atoms were juggling before my eyes:
My mind’s eye, sharpened by repeated sights of a similar kind, could not distinguish larger structures of different forms and in long chains, many of them close together; everything was moving in a snake-like and twisting manner. Suddenly, what was this? One of the snakes got hold of its own tail and the whole structure was mockingly twisting in front of my eyes. As if struck by lightning, I awoke.

This dream led Kekulé directly to the discovery of the structure of benzene, which is a closed carbon ring. A dream had presented a realization that served to revolutionize modern chemistry. Later, reporting his discovery to his colleagues at a scientific convention in 1890, he remarked, “Let us learn to dream, gentlemen, and then we may perhaps find the truth.” Not the sort of comment one generally expects from a scientist!

Here is the story of another scientist. Otto Loewi, who won the 1936 Nobel

Prize in Psychology and Medicine for his discovery of how the human nervous system works, credited this discovery to a dream. Prior to Loewi, scientists had assumed that the body’s nervous impulses were the result of electrical waves. However, in 1903 Loewi had the intuition that a chemical transmission was actually responsible. But he had no way to prove his theory, so he set the idea aside for many years. Then, in 1920, he had the following dream:

The night before Easter Sunday of that year I awoke, turned on the light, and jotted down a few notes on a tiny slip of thin paper. Then I fell asleep again. It occurred to me at six o’clock in the morning that during the night I had written down something most important, but I was unable to decipher the scrawl. The next night, at three o’clock, the idea returned. It was the design of an experiment to determine whether or not the hypothesis of chemical transmission that I had uttered seventeen years ago was correct. I got up immediately, went to the laboratory and performed a simple experiment on a frog’s heart according to the nocturnal design:
Its results became the foundation of the theory of chemical transmission of the nervous impulse.

Interestingly, Loewi had previously performed a similar experiment, which combined in his dreaming mind with the new idea, creating the successful result. This is an excellent example of the ability of dreams to combine with previous dreams, or with actual events, to produce fertile new ground.

These are some of the stories of famous people who have used dreams to solve problems, enhance creativity, and even make money and win important prizes. They are all evidence of the vast human ability to make use of dreams. As you draw upon your own dream life and develop skills in both dreaming and interpreting your dreams, you will become an advanced teen dreamer. Think of your dreams as a school where you are continually learning new skills and developing new aptitudes, reaching ever higher levels of achievement.

As you pay conscious attention to your dreams, and then use your dream symbols in your waking life, you will be integrating yourself, creating the greatest artwork of your life: your whole and unique Self.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

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