symptoms

The meaning of Symptoms in dream | Dream interpretation


Whether figurative or literal, research details and confirm; see “diagnosis”

Dream Dictionary Unlimited | Margaret Hamilton


Symptoms | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Symptoms


SWEETS

Seeing or eating sweets in a dream indicates one’s sincerity in his religious attendance, release of a prisoner, arrival of a traveller, recovery of a sick person, marriage of an unwed person, guidance, repentance, learning the Qur’an, buying new clothing for one’s children, having a loyal servant, or earning blessed monies. Seasonal sweets in a dream represent witnessing an annual festival, or the reinstatement of a just ruler.

To feel saturated with sweets in a dream means self-conceit, lies, or it could mean extollment, or speaking nice words. Eating sweets in a dream also means suffering from cold symptoms. Though, eating fermented sweets or preserves in a dream may represent a cure.

If a sweet is made from the basic four ingredients (i.e., honey, sugar, flour and manna or dates, or other fillings) in a dream, it means happiness, longevity, or escaping from the consequences of a dangerous business one ventures in with greed. As for a believer, eating sweets in a dream means tasting the blessings of one’s faith, though for a disbeliever, it means indulging in the pleasures of this world.

(Also seePastry; Seasonal sweets; Sweets maker)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

ABDOMEN

If healthy it indicates the manifestation of your wishes.

If unhealthy be careful of accidents. It could be an indication of not so happy events surfacing. Also - A dream of contrary.

If you dreamed you had pain in this region, you will have success due to good health and vigor. But if you dreamed of your abdomen being exposed in any way, it is a warning of unfaithfulness or treachery on the part of someone you trust. Be cautious with confidences. Also, dreaming about any body part is a way to bring the dreamer’s conscious attention to it. When, in your dream, you are feeling pain or discomfort in this area or any other area of the body, consider how well that part of your body is functioning in real life. Being health-conscious is a positive thing and both psychological and physical factors need to be considered. At times our unconscious knows that something is wrong even before we have any symptoms. “Old wives’ tales” tell us that this is a dream of the contrary and that you will have lots of vigor and good health.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

ILLNESS

If you are ill in your dream, please pay attention to your health. At times our unconscious gives us warnings before we are consciously aware of any symptoms. Emotional health can also be included in such dreams, so take care of your relationships and express your feelings in positive ways.

If someone you care about is ill in your dream, maybe you are concerned about losing the support and love of that person.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

DEAF

Not wanting to hear something, being uncomfortable. Also, either too much or too little compliance. Not being fully aware of one’s environment / surroundings. In rare cases, also real physical symptoms during sleep.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

STOMACH / STOMACH ILLNESS

First, make sure that there are no real physical symptoms.

If not, this symbol may be pointing to the ability to digest and to metabolize, to be receptive, and to deal with intellectual and emotional “food.”

A full stomach points to overstimulation and too much consumption.

An empty stomach is an indication of greed; you feel short-changed.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

REPAIRS

(see Hammer, Nails, Tools)

Look to see exactly what gets repaired in your dream. This can symbolize your body, mind, or spirit, or alternatively, a situation or relationship that needs mending. Usually repairs on a house equate to the self, whereas repairs to objects may be less personal in meaning.

The quality of the repairs performed here is also important. If, for example, a castle wall is patched with faulty materials and begins immediately to fall apart, this can reveal a halfhearted truce on the home front, or a makeshift cure for a malady that only covers symptoms.... The Language of Dreams

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The Language of Dreams

ANXIETY

Being plagued by anxiety is often a sign that you arc dealing with mistakes you’ve made. Feelings of guilt and lack of confidence are most often the reasons for nightmares.

The dream may also indicate fear of chaos and problems—sometimes also a far-reaching change in your life. Being hunted by terrible images: you are harboring secret worries, or people you consider dangerous are the cause of the anxiety.

If you frequendy dream about being fearful and anxious: courage and being more assertive will make it easier to overcome hurdles. Making others fearful: a difficult situation or disappointment ahead. Sometimes anxietv-filled dreams are a sign of physical symptoms, like heart problems. Frequent anxiety dreams would suggest that you make an appointment with your physician for a check up.

For women in particular, nightmares are often a sign of physical problems.

The circulatory system may also be reacting to a heavy meal, too much smoking, too much alcohol.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

FACE

Vision: Seeing a person with a pale face means a likely illness or even death. Looking at an ugly face: you are worried, or bothered by conflicts you have with others. Seeing a beautiful face: hopes have a chance to come true. Seeing your own face in a mirror: pay attention to physical symptoms, but don’t take yourself too seriously. Seeing a beautiful face reflected in the water means a long and agreeable life. Seeing a face with too much makeup: your friends are not what they appear to be— or thev are King.

Depth Psychology: Faces in dreams are the mirror of “the face of your soul”—the way the world sees you. Sometimes you might see the face of a stranger in a dream w ho will cross your path years later. What did vou see in this face?... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

FOREST

Vision: Seeing a beautiful forest: you have an unshakable faith in God and the future, and will experience prosperity and security in your old age. Seeing a forest fire: pay close attention to physical symptoms—your health is delicate. Seeing only the edge of a forest: a relationship is over.

Depth Psychology: The forest is a place where unresolved emotions and the shadow of the soul reside. Are you unable to “see the forest for the trees”? It is easy to get lost in the “forest of life”— the forest of so many experiences and so much information. See Tree.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

FROG

Vision: Seeing a frog means blessings in love and money matters. Hearing frogs croaking: repressed desires for love or sex will soon be making themselves known. Don’t give people an excuse to gossip. As of now, your reputation is still intact.

Holding a frog in your hands: you are going to win in something. Killing a frog: you are going to harm yourself.

Depth Psychology: The frog stands for emotional and spiritual changes, like the changes that take place from spawning to the final form (the fairy tale “The Frog and the Princess” comes to mind).

The dream is telling you not to he afraid of change. Hearing a frog croaking: these sounds are considered symptoms of emotional inadequacy; often they suggest that you are looking for a way out. You need to work more on your issues.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

OX

Symbol: The ox is a symbol of kindness, calmness, and strength.

Vision: Seeing an ox at work in the field: you will meet a very influential person and the relationship will be useful to you. Seeing an ox pulling a cart means hard work and a handsome payoff. Hearing the bellowing of the ox: be careful, there is danger afoot. Being attacked by an ox: an influential person becomes hostile. Watching an ox being slaughtered: beware of an impending illness; watch for physical symptoms. This dream also urges you to be less selfish and think more of others.

Depth Psychology: The ox represents clumsiness and being earthbound, and sometimes also being naive.

For older people, the dream is a sign of diminishing sexuality. Are you working like an ox? Acting like one? Do you think of yourself as a “dumb ox”?... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

NERVOUS

Whether you dreamed of being nervous yourself or of noticing the symptoms in others, the dream is warning you to control your tendency to be overgenerous with your resources.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

CHRIST

Religious svmbols mav appear in the dreams even of those who do not consider themselves religious. There are at least two reasons for this: first, even non-religious people have usually had some exposure to religious teaching,’and secondly, religion would seem to have an instinctive basis, originating in what vve now have to call (because we have lost touch with it) the unconscious part of the psyche.

One might be tempted to say that the Christ figure means whatever it means for you. That mav be true; but you are advised to consider the following possibilities.

(1) The Christ figure may represent perfection for you.

If so, it may be

functioning in your dream as a representation of your own true self. There may be a sense in which the Christ / supreme value is outside and beyond us: we are not yet perfect. However, the Christ in your dream comes from your own unconscious and signifies that what is of supreme value is realizable in yourself: indeed, it is yoprself, your not- yet-realized but potential self.

*

(2) If the figure is that of the Christ as a child, the interpretation given above is strengthened. See also Child, sections (3) and (4).

(3) If there is any association of homosexuality or bisexuality with the Christ in your dream, this again would tend to confirm the interpretation in (1) above. The hermaphrodite (literally, a fusion of the god Hermes and the goddess Aphrodite) is a recurring figure in religious symbolism - for example, the Hindu representation of Shiva as part man, part woman. It stands for the union of opposites. In psychic terms, such a figure represents the bringing together of conflicting forces such as conscious and unconscious, thought and feeling, ‘spirit5 and ‘body5, extroversion and introversion. See also Marriage.

(4) If the Christ in your dream is the crucified Christ, it may be a symbol of martyrdom.

If you identify with this figure, so that you are the wronged sufferer, ask yourself what purpose is being served by adopting this role. Does it make you happy? Well, pain may give pleasure if it helps us to feel ‘different5 and superior. (And that is often the other side of a martyrdom complex: an inflated view of self - inflated by fantasy.) But to get happiness by making yourself unhappy is self contradictory.

Your dream is most likely telling you to look at yourself objectively, and to get rid of the fantasy that has taken possession of you. It may help you to do so if you can identify the occasion that first started off this programme of self-punishment, or - failing that - any later occasions that reinforced the programme. The first cause will probably be some childhood feelings of guilt; and almost certainly it will be an imagined guilt, with little or no justification. (For instance, did you have, as a child, erotic desires for your parent of the opposite sex? So did we all.)

Above all, realize that you are not in the grip of some inexorable fate. What we call fate is actually those unconscious self-programmings that

begin as attempts to ward off the anxious fears that arise when our desires conflict with (real or imagined) parental or other authoritative disapproval.

(5) What is the Christ in your dream doing or saying? Is he healing someone - you? If so, the figure probably represents Nature’s power of healing that lies within yourself. The fact that this inner healing power reveals itself in a symbol means that it lies in your unconscious. You need to activate it, and the first step towards this consists of getting to know yourself better - vour unconscious self. In particular you need to get to know the opposed positive and negative forces at work in you and that element within you - perhaps long neglected - that is essential for healing. In psychological terms ‘healing’ means wholeness and harmony (the resolution of all serious inner conflicts). What is it vou need in your life to bring about wholeness? What part of you has been neglected?

The fact that the healing Christ has appeared in your dream, however, is a very good sign. It means that your unconscious is offering you its healing power. Don’t refuse it.

(6) Is the Christ figure pronouncing forgiveness? If so, it may mean either that you have been suffering from guilt-feelings and you have identified these as the symptoms of an inner conflict and are now ready to let go of the guilt and the tension; or that your unconscious is now offering you the means by w hich those guilt-feelings and the associated paralysing anxiety’ can be laid to rest once and for all.

In essence, forgiveness is a dissolving of guilt and anxiety’ (i.e. fear of punishment); and the dissolving agent is objective intelligence which sees through the guilt-feelings to their innocent cause. How can an innocent cause give rise to guilt-feelings? The answer lies in the power of fantasy, w’hich, especially in early childhood (w’hen, according to the psychologist Jean Piaget, no distinction is made between fantasy and reality’), makes mortal sins out of natural and unavoidable desires and leads to a belief that the whole world is bent on punishing the ‘offender’.

(7) Does the Christ figure in vour dream suggest submission and self- surrender, or non-resistance? If so, the dream may be understood to be showing you a pattern in your life that you need to change - a negative pattern of submitting to ‘fate’ or ‘circumstances outside your control’. Alternatively, it could be urging you to practise a positive kind of submission, in w’hich the ego gives wray to the greater wisdom of the unconscious, and false ambitions give wav to the promptings of the

inner true self - which represents your true ‘destiny5 (not to be confused with ‘fate5: fate is external, destiny comes from within).

(8) Is it the risen - resurrected - Christ who appears in the dream? If so, this may be taken as an auspicious sign of potential self-renewal or self-transcendence: the possibility of rising to a new and fuller selfhood, leaving behind all deep internal conflict, anxiety and discontent.

(9) Is the Christ in your dream surrounded by four figures (the four evangelists, or their symbols - angel, lion, ox, eagle)? This is a mandala (see Mandala), which represents psychic wholeness.

NB It can be dangerous to rely too heavily on a being outside ourselves. For example, to think of our sins as being off-loaded on to an external Christ may be a useful and, indeed, healthy stratagem so long as the idea is not taken literally; so long, that is, as it is seen as a symbolic representation of an internal process in which the sin-dissolving agent is our own intelligent T. Otherwise, we are in danger of relinquishing responsibility for our actions and for our own future.

The Christ figure - like all other figures that occur in your dreams - is thrown up by your unconscious and is a pictorial representation of something in the depths of your psyche.

This does not contradict the religious view of the Christ as a universal reality. It would seem that there is a layer of the individual psyche which is not an individual possession but belongs to Nature as such and manifests itself in every existing being. Psychology and theology meet in the mystical understanding which sees the Christ as the universal T, the only subject there is. This is to see all things and all persons as incarnations or embodiments of one and the same reality. This mystical view is found in all the great religious traditions.

If this view is true, it provides a basis for an immediate and intimate relation between the individual and God, a relationship which can properly serve as a source of certainty and confidence, a correct self-esteem and immunity to anxiety.... A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

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A Dictionary of Dream Symbols

CANCER

To dream that you have this disease does not have to be a prediction (although if you have symptoms of discomfort, it is worth a check). Cancer is a tumor, and the dream could mean that an undesired element is becoming part of yourself or is growing in excess; for example a growing obsession that can affect your personality, and even your health. Having cancer in dreams also indicates that you do not properly deal with your emotions which end up being destructive; the dream is a warning against that.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

SLAPPING

A slap always indicates a drastic reaction. It can be interpreted as a warning from the subconscious to rectify a judgment or an attitude. Maybe, the time is right to take a break along the way and reconsider. It may also warn against an illness that you have not yet noticed any symptoms of.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

SUIT

A suit could represent your desire to impress someone.

It is possible that it hints at the good state of your self-confidence or the side that you show in the professional sphere.

According to gypsy tradition, wearing a suit foretells successes.

Suitcase analysis of a dream

Carlos dreamed: “I was looking for my bag and could not find it anywhere. I was at the airport and my plane was about to take off. They announced the last call to board, and I could not remember where I had left it. I was very distressed, it had all my documents, valuables, and money. But I could not miss the plane because an important business meeting awaited me. I spent the whole dream running back and forth, searching every corner of the airport, but nothing, the suitcase did not appear and I couldn’t leave; the tickets were inside.”

When Charles had this dream he was suffering the first symptoms of mild depression. He felt very sad, insecure, and uncomfortable in his life, but did not know how to improve it. Searching in dreams alludes to a lack, something that we need for our emotional stability. The suitcase full of important things reflects the values that guide us in life, without which we would feel lost, like Carlos. The plane shows our desire to excel, to rise or transcend our daily concerns. The fact that he missed it indicates that he felt unable to move forward, despite his continued attempts (running from back and forth, looking everywhere . . .). A month later, Carlos began treatment with a psychoanalyst to overcome his sadness. After a few days, he found his oneiric suitcase in a dream and managed to catch the plane. In his waking world, he began to understand the causes of his discomfort and feel more satisfied and confident in himself.... The Big Dictionary of Dreams

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The Big Dictionary of Dreams

VENEREAL DISEASE

Shame toward sexuality and negative consequences due to poor choices are at the center of this symbol. Take a look at the darker side of your feelings about sex if venereal disease is a part of your dream.

The person who has symptoms in the dream should feature prominently in your interpretation.

If it is you, then a general sense of sexual shame is being explored.

If the person in your dream is someone other than you, use the character-aspect concept to associate what part of your own personality or decision-making process is emanating out of a shameful place.... Complete Dictionary of Dreams

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Complete Dictionary of Dreams

HEALING DREAMS

There is a long tradition of dreams being a resource for physical and psychological healing. The ancient Greek god Aesculapius was believed to come to people in their sleep to offer healing through their dreams. The sick and wounded would travel from far away places to sleep in the temple of Aesculapius to let the healer enter their dreams and heal them. The Greek philosopher Aristotle believed that premonitory dreams of sickness could be caused by the dreamer’s unconscious recognition of the symptoms. He postulated that dreams may be premonitions of an illness coming from within the body, where some ’unconscious’ mind recognized early symptoms that had not yet come to the attention of the ’waking self’. The Iroquois Amerindians used a social form of dream therapy and one of the earliest recorded instances of such healing is the famous story in the Old Testament, when Joseph revealed the meaning of dreams to Pharaoh.

Sigmund Freud pioneered the use of dreams in therapy, bringing them to widespread attention, but many other approaches have been developed since then. The common feature for people who use dreams as therapeutic tools for physical and emotional healing is that dreams can empower them; they feel in touch with a powerful inner process that they believe is working actively for their own good.

Since time immemorial, people have created special places in which to sleep and dream. The dreaming chamber on the island of Malta is one example, but ancient dream temples can be found all over the world. These places were meant to ’incubate’ wise, deep dreams that would bring guidance and healing to the dreamer. Most of us do not have a dream temple located conveniently nearby; but the idea of receiving valuable, healing dreams is an appealing one, so here are four simple steps for creating a dream temple anywhere you like.

Find or create a special place for dreaming
For those of us fortunate enough to have more than enough rooms in our living space, the answer is simple: make one of those rooms— perhaps a guest room that is rarely used—into a dream place. Furnish it sparklingly, but make sure that the bed is comfortable. For the majority of us who don’t have a room to spare, we need to be a little bit more creative. Clear some space in a room in which you are comfortable and designate it as your dream place. All the time, keep in mind that you are preparing your sleeping space to facilitate your dreaming.

Prepare yourself
You are going to be welcoming dreams in a way that you don’t ordinarily do, so treat the experience as special from the outset. You might want to take a long bath. Make yourself comfortable. Eat lightly, if at all, for dinner. It’s probably best if you don’t consume alcohol or smoke the day before your dream incubation. As you go through your activities, keep in mind that you are preparing yourself to welcome dreams.

Focus on dreaming
Throughout your day, you are simply preparing yourself to be more receptive to dreams. Focus on dreaming.

If you have a particular issue in your life, you might tell yourself to ask for guidance in your dream.

Sweet dreams
This is not a one-shot exploration. Try it for a few days or even for a week—or for as long as you like. ... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

DO ANIMALS DREAM?

It seems that they do, although we can’t know for sure. All we can measure is whether or not they have REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, which is more or less associated with dreams. All mammals have REM sleep, and that increases the likelihood that they do dream.

Because REM sleep is recognizable in mammals and birds, but not in snakes and other reptiles, scientists think that most warm- blooded animals dream. Studies have monitored the sleep of goats, sheep, cats, dogs, rats, mice, monkeys and apes, and all had dream periods and symptoms; all except the spiny anteater, which seems to be a dream-free mammal.

Watch a sleeping dog or cat sometime, and you can tell if it is dreaming of running after something. Its eyes twitch, sometimes it moves its paws—something could be happening in its dreams.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

THE HISTORY AND SCIENCE OF NIGHTMARES

In ancient times, nightmares were thought to be caused by evil spirits. The word, in fact, derives from a Scandinavian legend in which a ‘nacht-mara’—the ‘mara’ being a female demon—came and sat on the sleeper’s chest at night, leaving him with a heavy, suffocating sensation of being awake but paralyzed. Nightmares have been known to inspire great artists: John Henry Fuseli’s 1781 painting ‘The Nightmare’ caused a sensation with its depiction of an incubus crouching on the body of a sleeping woman. John Newton—a slave trader and the composer of the hymn ‘Amazing Grace’—became an abolitionist after a nightmare in which he saw ‘all of Europe consumed in a great raging fire’ whilst he was the captain of a slave ship. Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde was inspired, in part, by a nightmare. Elias Howe, who invented the sewing machine, came up with the breakthrough concept of a needle with a hole at the pointed end after he had a nightmare in which jungle warriors brandished spears that had holes in their blades.

As we have seen, both Freud and Jung had theories regarding nightmares: Freud tried to explain them as the expression of unfulfilled wishes, whilst Jung described them as part of humankind’s ‘collective unconscious’ and argued that the helplessness we feel in nightmares is a memory of the fears experienced by primitive peoples. Today, in medical textbooks, nightmares are most commonly defined as a disturbing dream that results in at least a partial awakening.

Nightmares, in common with most dreams, occur during REM stages of sleep and they generally cause the dreamer to wake up.

If you don’t wake up, the dream is not technically a nightmare and could be described as a bad dream. Nightmares are often characterized by the following symptoms: a sense of fear and dread that lingers for hours or days after the dream upon awakening; the ability to recall all or part of a dream scene; in most cases the dreamer is threatened or actually harmed in some way; a recognition of powerful images in the dream or the repetition of the dream itself for months or even years after; and a physical paralysis or lack of muscle tone called atonia which signifies REM sleep.

Drugs, alcohol, lack of sleep and spicy food can alter the quality and quantity of REM sleep and perhaps trigger nightmares but there is no hard evidence to support this. Whilst these things can increase the risk of nightmares, the mundane struggles in daily life are generally thought to be the cause of most nightmares. Sleep researchers have discovered that long-standing nightmare sufferers tend to be emotional, creative, sensitive but prone to depression.

Modern sleep researchers have identified the following causes for nightmares:

• Unconscious memory of intense emotions such as that of a child being abandoned by its mother. Many people have had the experience of feeling trapped in a difficult situation—a terrible marriage or another situation they want to get out of—and nightmares can hark back to that situation, mirroring the intense feelings of being trapped associated with it.

• Intense experiences produced by external situations, such as involvement in war or being a victim of assault. Trauma, surgery, a death in the family, crime and accidents can also cause them to proliferate.

• Many nightmares in adults arise from fears connected with repressed internal drives or from fears concerning the process of growth and change.

• Threats to self-esteem. People may be faced by or fear the loss of something important to them, such as the failure of a relationship or the loss of a child, being seen to fail at work or not being able to cope with life in other ways. Nightmares may arise out of feelings of inferiority or loss of self-confidence.

Some sleep researchers consider the occasional nightmare to be a natural response to stress; the dream is seen to be the body’s way of practicing its ‘fight or flee’ response, providing us with a way to work through aggressive feelings in a safe way, given that the body’s muscles are essentially paralyzed during REM sleep.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS NIGHTMARE

If you have experienced a traumatic event, for example an attack, accident or disaster, such as an earthquake, you may find that your dreaming mind recalls the horror of that event but as time passes the nightmares tend to become less intense. In general, they have little meaning other than your memory of it and are an attempt by your dreaming mind to help you deal with the original horror. Post-traumatic stress nightmares are usually different from other nightmares as the content of the dream will closely resemble a traumatic event that happened in their waking lives.

POWs from World War II and concentration camp survivors have been known to suffer post-traumatic stress nightmares for up to fifty years after the event. Unlike ‘normal’ nightmares, these dreamers can experience significant physical symptoms during REM sleep and non-REM sleep, such as an increase in respiration and heart rate, muscle twitches and more than one arousal. Adults might experience other traumatic events in their lives, such as the loss of a loved one or bankruptcy, and these events can also continue to play out in dreams over the years in the form of nightmares. The more standard anxiety nightmare dreamers, however, have nightmares that relate to work, school or relationship stresses. The threat here isn’t to your life but to your self-confidence and sense of self.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

DISEASE

Some people believe that dreams can sometimes spot illness before your waking self is aware of its symptoms, so if a dream of disease persists or you can’t shake the memory of it, get your health checked by a doctor. On the other hand, the dream may be focusing on anxieties and inner conflicts with which you need to deal so that you can move forward with your life and find emotional harmony. Dreams that feature disease as a theme may refer to some discomfort or uncertainty in your waking life. Perhaps someone in particular is making life difficult for you?

If you have leprosy in a dream, do you feel like a social outcast? If another person is unwell in your dream and you recognize them, you may either harbor negative feelings towards that particular person or fear for their emotional health. Memories of childhood illnesses, such as chicken pox or measles, may express a simple longing for the unconditional love of a parent. For Jungians, dreams of fainting may be prompted by a sudden insight into the essential nature of a personal ambition, whilst for Freud these are wish-fulfillment dreams relating to orgasm.

According to ancient predictive dreamlore, your interpretation of dreams concerning your health should reverse the state of health pictured in the dream. Dreams of poor health, therefore, predict a period of good health, whilst dreams of disease suggest a period of good health.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

EDGAR CAYCE ON DREAMS

Cayce was able to obtain virtually an unlimited amount of knowledge on an unlimited number of subjects. One of these subjects was dreams and dream interpretation. Cayce was able to astound people by interpreting their dreams and giving them insight into their psyche, lives and even past lives. Cayce revealed that dreams are actually journeys into the spirit world.

Edgar Cayce once said, “Dreams, visions, impressions, to the entity in the normal sleeping state are the presentations of the experiences necessary for the development, if the entity would apply them in the physical life. These may be taken as warnings, as advice, as conditions to be met, conditions to be viewed in a way and manner as lessons, as truths, as they are presented in the various ways and manners.”

Cayce believed that our dreams serve several functions. Somatic dreams - dreams referring to the body - are extremely important to be mindful of. Very often dreams will offer solutions to health problems. For example, one man was plagued with food allergies for many years, but was unable to find the source of his discomfort. Then one night he went to bed and he dreamed of a can of coffee. He quit drinking coffee and his symptoms disappeared.

Cayce also believed that deceased friends and family members do occasionally visit us in our dream state. These occurrences may offer direct communication with those people or allow us to resolve our feelings about their death. The person may also represent some aspect of themselves.

During the dreaming state of sleep, we experience the different levels of consciousness and receive input from the different realms of the spirit world. Through dreaming, we have special access to our spirit within. According to the Cayce readings, there is not a question we can ask which cannot be answered from the depths of our inner consciousness when the proper attunement is made.

A dream may be of a physical, mental, or spiritual nature and may deal with all manner of psychic manifestations. These include telepathy, clairvoyance, prophetic visions, out of body traveling, remembrance of past lives, communication with beings in other realms including deceased friends and relatives, spirit guides, angels, Christ, and even the voice of God. Dreams can also give invaluable information on the status of the body.

Cayce felt that there is no dimension of human life, whether social, financial, emotional or physical, mental or spiritual with which the dream may not on occasion deal. Dreams may encourage or reprimand, instruct or deceive, inspire or seduce, guide or confuse.

The potential for an immense array of experiences in consciousness is always there. What we actually receive depends upon our attitudes, motivations, the measure of our attunement, and the extent to which we have made applicable what was received in earlier dreams and in waking experiences.

The dream world is a strange yet fascinating place! There are several different kinds of dreams. Let’s look at those in our next section.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

TYPES OF DREAMS

Daydreams
Studies show that we all have the tendency to daydream an average of 70-120 minutes a day. Day dreaming is classified as a level of consciousness between sleep and wakefulness. It occurs during our waking hours when we let our imagination carry us away. As our minds begin to wander and our level of awareness decreases, we lose ourselves in our imagined scenario and fantasy.

Lucid Dreams
Lucid dreams occur when you realize you are dreaming. “Wait a second. This is only a dream!” Most dreamers wake themselves up once they realize that they are only dreaming. Other dreamers have cultivated the skill to remain in the lucid state of dreaming. They become an active participant in their own dreams, making decisions in their dreams and influencing the dream’s outcome without awakening.

Nightmares
A nightmare is a disturbing dream that causes the dreamer to wake up feeling anxious and frightened. Nightmares may be a response to real life trauma and situations. This type of nightmare falls under a special category called Post-traumatic Stress Nightmare (PSN).

Nightmares may also occur because we have ignored or refused to accept a particular life situation. Research shows that most people who have regular nightmares have had a family history of psychiatric problems, bad drug experiences, people who have contemplated suicide, and/or rocky relationships.

Nightmares are an indication of a fear that needs to be acknowledged and confronted. It is a way for our subconscious to make up take notice. “Pay attention!” We’ll have more later in the book about nightmares and steps you can take to overcome them.

Recurring Dreams
Recurring dreams repeat themselves with little variation in story or theme. These dreams may be positive, but most often they are nightmarish in content. Dreams may recur because a conflict depicted in the dream remains unresolved or ignored. Once you have found a resolution to the problem, your recurring dreams will cease.

Healing Dreams
Healing dreams serve as messages for the dreamer in regards to their health. Many dream experts believe that dreams can help us avoid potential health problems and help us to heal when we are ill. Our bodies are able to communicate to us through our dreams to “tell” us that something is not quite right with our bodies even before any physical symptoms show up. Dreams of this nature may be telling the dreamer that he/she needs to go to the dentist or doctor

Prophetic Dreams
Prophetic dreams also referred to as precognitive or psychic dreams are dreams that seemingly foretell the future. One rational theory to explain this phenomenon is that our dreaming mind is able to piece together bits of information and observation that we normally overlook or that we do not seriously consider. In other words, our unconscious mind knows what is coming before we consciously piece together the same information.

Signal Dreams
Signal dreams help you how to solve problems or make decisions in your waking life.

Epic Dreams
Epic dreams (or Great dreams) are so huge, so compelling, and so vivid that you cannot ignore them. The details of such dreams remain with you for years, as if your dreamt it last night. These dreams possess much beauty and contain many archetypal symbology. When you wake up from such a dream, you feel that you have discovered something profound or amazing about yourself or about the world. It feels like a life-changing experience

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NIGHTMARES

Children, especially, are prone to nightmares. Nightmares are common in children, typically beginning at around age 3 and occurring up to age 7-8.

People with anxiety disorder might also experience what experts term “night terrors”. These are actually panic attacks that occur in sleep.

It is especially difficult to remember these types of dreams since they conjure up terrifying images that we would just as soon forget.

In poetic myth, the Nightmare is actually a “small nettlesome mare, not more than thirteen hands high, of the breed familiar with the Elgin marbles: cream-colored, clean- limbed, with a long head, bluish eye, flowing mane and tail.” Her nests, called mares’ nests, “when one comes across them in dreams, lodged in rock-clefs or the branches of enormous hollow yews, are built of carefully chosen twigs lined with white horse-hair and the plumage of prophetic birds and littered with the jaw-bones and entrails of poets.”

Thus, in a pagan world of myth and blood sacrifice, the Nightmare was a cruel, fearful creature. Our modern word nightmare derives from the Middle English nihtmare (from niht, night, and mare, demon), an evil spirit believed to haunt and suffocate sleeping people. And so, in today’s world, when we speak of a nightmare we mean a frightening dream accompanied by a sensation of oppression and helplessness.

The blood-thirsty aspect of the mythic Nightmare, however, can give a good clue about nightmares in general, for in psychodynamic terms nightmares are graphic depictions of raw, primitive emotions such as aggression and rage that have not been incorporated into the conscious psyche. Thus we tend to encounter these “ugly” aspects of our unconscious lives as terrifying dream images in whose presence we feel completely helpless.

Nightmares are quite common in childhood because this is a time of our emotional development when we all have to come to terms with, well, raw, primitive emotions such as aggression and rage.

Traumatic nightmares can also occur as one of the many symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Repetitive, intrusive nightmares following a trauma often contain symbolic themes that mirror the original trauma and relate to threat to life, threat of abandonment or death, or loss of identity.

Therefore, traumatic nightmares need to be treated differently than other dreams. It’s not enough just to “know” intellectually the psychological reasons why you have these nightmares. An event is traumatic because it disrupts your previously secure—and illusory—sense of “self.” And so, to heal from a trauma, you must take the initiative to make conscious changes in your life to accommodate the traumatic shattering of your illusions about life and identity.

Some believe that nightmares have a physiological nature as well. Edgar Cayce believed that Nightmares, which bring with them an inability to move or cry out, usually indicate the wrong diet. To end the nightmarish dreams change your diet.

We found a technique online that can help people who suffer from recurrent nightmares. It is not meant to be a cure-all. It is just a suggested treatment to deal with frightening nightmares. The idea is to use this therapy every night until the nightmare has been resolved. It is called Imagery Rehearsal Therapy.

Here are the steps of Imagery Rehearsal Therapy:

  • Write out the text of the nightmare. Tell the story, no matter how frightening, in as much detail as you can remember.
  • Create a new ending for the nightmare story and write it out. Be careful, however, to make the new ending peaceful. Remember that the nightmare is grounded in emotions such as raw anger that have been provoked by a trauma. The point of a new ending is to “tame” the emotions, not merely vent them in violence and revenge.
  • Rehearse the new version of the story in your imagination each night just before going to sleep. Do this as close as possible to your falling asleep without any other activity between the rehearsal and sleep.
  • Perform a relaxation exercise. Do this immediately after the rehearsal, as a way to fall asleep peacefully. You may use any technique with which you are familiar. This could be meditation, yoga, or breathing exercises.The “cousin” of nightmares is disturbing dreams with unpleasant images.
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WHY ARE DREAMS HEALING?

The idea that dreams can be healing is not new. In the ancient civiliza¬ tions of Egypt and Greece, patients who failed to respond to medical treatment could arrange to sleep in a temple especially dedicated to the god of healing. They hoped he would visit them in a dream, enabling them to regain their health. The temples of the Greek God Asclepius were especially renowned for their high success rate - and often grew rich on the contributions of grateful patients.

Native American Indians believed that dreams were sent by the Great Spirit, to act as a guiding light for your soul and prevent it from becoming lost in the darkness of ignorance. Losing touch with them would be disastrous, as you would then be unaware of your true path in life and become depressed or ill.

The eminent psychologist Carl Jung also believed in the healing power of dreams, many years of clinical experience convincing him that most of our problems are the

result of losing contact with our deepest instincts. He observed that there is a way of gaining access to the age-old wisdom hidden in each of us deep within the unconscious mind. That way is through our dreams.

Nowadays, doctors are well aware of the link between our state of mind and physical symptoms. Stress is a major factor in ill-health, whilst suppressed

feelings like rage or resentment can also disturb the body’s equilibrium and create dis-ease. Our dreams are nature’s way of helping us to maintain a balanced outlook. They usually contain helpful messages about the emotional adjustments we need to make from day to day. If we take these seriously, we avoid nurturing unrealistic attitudes and prevent the build-up of stress or toxic emotions.

Sometimes you may develop an illness if you secretly feel unable to face up to something and have a need for someone to take care of you. Your dreams can reveal your hidden agenda and suggest a way for¬ ward. In helping you to focus on the underlying cause of your symptoms, they enable you to participate in your own healing process.

Your dreams can further your emotional well-being by helping you to understand how your feelings and attitudes affect other people, often at a subliminal level, and can therefore create or destroy relationships. If someone has let you down, for instance, your dreams may reveal that, subconsciously, you expect people to disappoint you - and, sooner or later, that is exactly what they do. Once you wake up to the fact that relationships don’t have to turn out this way, you can transform your life.

Whether you need more confidence, to have better relationships, or the courage to make the correct decisions, your dreams can guide you through even the most difficult situations and help you to become the person nature always meant you to be. I hope this Dream Encyclopedia will inspire you to find out more about one of your most precious, yet most neglected natural resources - your dreams.... Dreampedia

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