terms

The meaning of Terms in dream | Dream interpretation


Brought to one’s attention to prevent boundaries from being crossed

Dream Dictionary Unlimited | Margaret Hamilton


Terms | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Terms


CATS

To dream of a cat, denotes ill luck, if you do not succeed in killing it or driving it from your sight.

If the cat attacks you, you will have enemies who will go to any extreme to blacken your reputation and to cause you loss of property. But if you succeed in banishing it, you will overcome great obstacles and rise in fortune and fame.

If you meet a thin, mean and dirty-looking cat, you will have bad news from the absent. Some friend lies at death’s door; but if you chase it out of sight, your friend will recover after a long and lingering sickness.

To hear the scream or the mewing of a cat, some false friend is using all the words and work at his command to do you harm.

To dream that a cat scratches you, an enemy will succeed in wrenching from you the profits of a deal that you have spent many days making.

If a young woman dreams that she is holding a cat, or kitten, she will be influenced into some impropriety through the treachery of others.

To dream of a clean white cat, denotes entanglements which, while seemingly harmless, will prove a source of sorrow and loss of wealth. When a merchant dreams of a cat, he should put his best energies to work, as his competitors are about to succeed in demolishing his standard of dealing, and he will be forced to other measures if he undersells others and still succeeds.

To dream of seeing a cat and snake on friendly terms signifies the beginning of an angry struggle. It denotes that an enemy is being entertained by you with the intention of using him to find out some secret which you believe concerns yourself; uneasy of his confidences given, you will endeavor to disclaim all knowledge of his actions, as you are fearful that things divulged, concerning your private life, may become public. ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

DOGS

To dream of a vicious dog, denotes enemies and unalterable misfortune.

To dream that a dog fondles you, indicates great gain and constant friends.

To dream of owning a dog with fine qualities, denotes that you will be possessed of solid wealth.

To dream that a blood-hound is tracking you, you are likely to fall into some temptation, in which there is much danger of your downfall.

To dream of small dogs, indicates that your thoughts and chief pleasures are of a frivolous order.

To dream of dogs biting you, foretells for you a quarrelsome companion either in marriage or business. Lean, filthy dogs, indicate failure in business, also sickness among children.

To dream of a dog-show, is indicative of many and varied favors from fortune.

To hear the barking of dogs, foretells news of a depressing nature. Difficulties are more than likely to follow.

To see dogs on the chase of foxes, and other large game, denotes an unusual briskness in all affairs.

To see fancy pet dogs, signifies a love of show, and that the owner is selfish and narrow.

For a young woman, this dream foretells a fop for a sweetheart.

To feel much fright upon seeing a large mastiff, denotes that you will experience inconvenience because of efforts to rise above mediocrity.

If a woman dreams this, she will marry a wise and humane man.

To hear the growling and snarling of dogs, indicates that you are at the mercy of designing people, and you will be afflicted with unpleasant home surroundings.

To hear the lonely baying of a dog, foretells a death or a long separation from friends.

To hear dogs growling and fighting, portends that you will be overcome by your enemies, and your life will be filled with depression.

To see dogs and cats seemingly on friendly terms, and suddenly turning on each other, showing their teeth and a general fight ensuing, you will meet with disaster in love and worldly pursuits, unless you succeed in quelling the row.

If you dream of a friendly white dog approaching you, it portends for you a victorious engagement whether in business or love.

For a woman, this is an omen of an early marriage.

To dream of a many-headed dog, you are trying to maintain too many branches of business at one time. Success always comes with concentration of energies.

A man who wishes to succeed in anything should be warned by this dream.

To dream of a mad dog, your most strenuous efforts will not bring desired results, and fatal disease may be clutching at your vitals.

If a mad dog succeeds in biting you, it is a sign that you or some loved one is on the verge of insanity, and a deplorable tragedy may occur.

To dream of traveling alone, with a dog following you, foretells stanch friends and successful undertakings.

To dream of dogs swimming, indicates for you an easy stretch to happiness and fortune.

To dream that a dog kills a cat in your presence, is significant of profitable dealings and some unexpected pleasure.

For a dog to kill a snake in your presence, is an omen of good luck ... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

BANISHMENT

1. A situation is changing for the better.

2. Opportuni­ties expand in a new environment, usually in terms of financial security. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

CALENDAR

1. Conscious of time passing.

2. Worry about life going by.

3. Worried about a big date, either in terms of business or romance. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

CLUB

1. If one feels accepted into the club, one feels accepted by family and friends.

2. If one is thrown out of the club, one has done something that one feels guilty about.

3. A measure of how one feels in terms of expressing individuality, i.E., Feeling dom­inated by or dominating the club one is in. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

ENCYCLOPEDIA

Desire to be smarter, more well-rounded in terms of what one knows. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

LAP

1. Actions may cause hurt to others.

2. A possible loss of reputa­tion.

3. Good news is on the way, especially in terms of love re­lationships (to be sitting on the lap of a member of the dreamer’s preferred sex). ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

TRANSMISSION

1. The ability to adapt to society or life’s demands (ve­hicle transmission; note the condition of transmission and abil­ity to “shift gears”).

2. The ability to communicate in general terms, broadcast self-image and intent.

3. A message is attempt­ing to pass from one level of consciousness to the next. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

TURKEY

1. Abundance is in the offing, often in terms of family life.

2. Taking things seriously (as in “talking turkey”).

3. Not taking things seriously, playing the fool. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

WOODPECKER

A role model, in terms of hard work, to be emulated. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

YALTA

One is considering coming to terms with people who have common interests (meeting of stalin, roosevelt and churchill at yalta). ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

ASCENDING THE SKY OR HEAVENS

If a person sees himself as ascending and entering the Sky, he will attain martyrdom, become eminent in the sight of Allah, cross the siraat swiftly on the Day of Judgment, attain respectability in this world and be remembered in favorable terms by the people.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

BODY LIMBS

In a dream, the head and the brain represent man’s controller, strength, benefits, longevity, wisdom or power. One’s ears in a dream represent his wife, daughter, sister or aunt.

The eyes represent one’s faith, religion or children.

The right eye represents his son and the left eye represents his daughter.

The forehead in a dream represents one’s beauty, son, power, honor, wealth, leadership or the point of prostration in one’s prayers.

A wide forehead in a dream means prosperity, while a narrow forehead means tightness.

The eyebrows represent one’s protection or spiritual guardianship. As for the human nose in a dream, it represents honor, longevity and respect. Whatever comes out of one’s nose in a dream is good and whatever goes into it in a dream may not be beneficial.

A bleeding nose in a dream means receiving or giving money.

If one’s nose is cut off in a dream, it means circumcision, falling in rank, or it could mean his death. Inhaling water and clearing one’s nose in a dream represents someone who deceives his wife.

If a bird or an animal comes out of one’s nose in a dream, it means that a cattle, a pet, or a domesticated animal will give birth to its babies in such a house.

A large nose in a dream represents honor and respect. Smelling a nice fragrance in a dream means begetting a son, or it could mean relief from difficulties. One’s face in a dream represents his happiness or his sorrow. Seeing the forehead and the face in a dream means money, honor and a beautiful woman.

The earlock and the temples represent two noble and blessed daughters.

A bright face in a dream means glad tidings, while a yellowish face in a dream means bad news or miseries. Frowning in a dream means a misfortune. Ifa woman sees herselffrowning in a dream, it means the death of her husband.

The two lips in a dream represent one’s helpers.

The lower lip is stronger in meaning than the upper lip.

It is also said that lips in a dream represent one’s relatives.

The upper lip represents the male relatives and the lower lip represents the female relatives. Sealed lips in a dream mean difficulties or adversities.

The mouth in a dream represents a key, one’s livelihood, the conclusion of one’s life, death, illness, strength, a coffer, a marketplace, a door attendant, a chief minister, or a door.lfone’s mouth is sealed in a dream, it means a scandal. One’s tongue in a dream represents his or her translator.

A long tongued person in a dream may mean winning an argument, or it could mean innocence from allegation.

An elongated tongue of ajudge in a dream means clarity and justice.

A tied-up tongue in a dream means poverty, sickness, depression, a calamity, or it could represent an unworthy person. Having two tongues in a dream means praiseworthiness and acquiring two types of knowledge. Seeing what is inside one’s mouth in a dream means exposing one’s ills. Biting on one’s tongue in a dream means regret. Watching one’s tongue in a dream means protecting oneself from pitfalls. Carrying one’s tongue by hand in a dream means receiving indemnity for bodily injury or receiving blood money.

If one sees his throat blocked in such a way that he could not speak in a dream, it denotes his stinginess toward his own family. Ifone sees one of his limbs speaking against him in a dream, it means that someone will report him to the authorities or become a witness against him in court. Ifone sees himself in a dream riding over the shoulders of his enemy, it means that he will commit a wrongdoing or a shameful act.

If there is no enmity between them, and if he sees himself riding over the shoulders of a friend in a dream, it means earning something from him. Carrying something over one’s shoulders in a dream means debts.

If one sees himselfcarrying a hypocrite over his shoulders in a dream, it means that he may work in a lumberyard or carry wood to earn a living. One’s shoulders in a dream also represent his parents, brothers, partners, station, or beauty. Anything that affects them in a dream will manifest in any ofthe above. In a dream, one’s neck represents an embrace, a donation with terms, a legal will, or a conditional endowment.

The neck and the shoulders in a dream represent one’s trust or trustworthiness.

A healthy and strong neck in a dream means trustworthiness and ability to meet one’s obligations. Wounds, festering or purulence in one’s neck in a dream mean betraying God’s trust.

If one sees a nice bird sitting over his neck in a dream it means benefits or an alibi.

If it is not a gentle bird, then it becomes a bad omen, or a rebuke.

If one sees a necklace, a rope, a wire, or a thread around his neck in a dream, it means fulfilling one’s promise, acquiring knowledge and honor.

A long neck in a dream could mean four things, that is justice, leadership, attainment of one’s goals or calling people to prayers.

The left hand represents one’s helper, friend, savings, or a compassionate relative. Longhands in a dream represent a charitable person, or a capable one, and short hands mean the opposite. Long hands also could mean longevity, wealth, helpers, borrowing money, governing, fulfilling one’s commands, profits from one’s business or having business sense.

If one’s hand is cut off in a dream, it means the death of his brother, his father, his partner, or a close friend or his assistant.

If the right hand is cut off in a dream, it means a vow one takes to deprive someone from his rights. It also means loss of one’sjob or cuttingoffone’s blood ties, or it could mean that he has committed a theft.

If a righteous person sees his hand cut off in a dream, it means abstaining from wrongdoing or eschewing evil.

If one’s left hand is cut off in a dream, it means reestablishing his relationship with his family and rediscovering the benefits of good qualities.

If one’s hand is broken in a dream, it means an adversity, illness, loss of business, or loss of a dear person.

The cracking skin of one’s hands in a dream means loss of wealth. Stretched hands in a dream means ill caused by a close friend. Stretching one’s hands in a dream also could mean generosity.

If one’s hands are cut off without causinghim any pain in a dream, it means that he may fall in love.

If one sees his hands joined together in a dream, it means having a family reunion, or a wedding. Ifone’s hands are trembling in a dream, it means weakness, illness, old age or longevity.

If one’s hands feel dry in a dream” it means that such a person does little good in his life. Ifone enters his hand under his arm’s pit in a dream, then brings it out bright and radiant in a dream, it means that he will acquire knowledge and may develop wisdom. Otherwise, it could mean profits.

If he brings forth his hand from under his arm’s pit in the dream, and if it reveal a flame in his dream, it represents a manifestation of divine power and a blessed victory.

If one pulls his hand from under his arm’s pit and it brings forth water in the dream, it means that he will receive great benefits and growth in his life, or perhaps that a long awaited traveller will shortly arrive to his doorsteps.

If a right-handed person sees himself being lefthanded in a dream, it means hardships.

If one sees himself walking with his hands in a dream, it represents his dependence on a relative to provide for his needs.

If one’s hands say something nice to him in a dream, it means financial comfort. Ifone’s hand is cut-offin a dream as punishment for a sin, it could mean marriage, a bad wife, or lack of trustworthiness.

If one washes his hands with soap in a dream, it means that he will abandon something he initiated, or that his intention will not be fulfilled.

If a form of life or a good spirit comes out from one’s hands in a dream, it indicates benefits.

If such a life is a malignant one, then it means the opposite.

If one takes someone by the hand in a dream, it means that he will help him and save his life. Ifsomethingsprouts in one’s hands or if one’s hands turn into iron, or a vegetable in a dream, it means negative that is a brother, a sister, a partner, a son, a compassionate friend, one’s strength, wealth, leadership, money, proof, a craft, or work.

The condition in which the palm of one’s hand looks in a dream indicates the state of one’s health and fitness. Clapping one’s hands in a dream could either mean joy and happiness, or it could mean nothing. Wearing a glove in one’s hand in a dream means ceasing the course of wrongdoing. Slapping one’s own face with both hands means sorrow, sadness or calamities. Hitting the back of one’s hand into the palm of the other hand in a dream means separation. In a dream, the fingers of the right hand represent the daily five time prayers.

The thumb represents the pre-dawn prayer, the index represents the midday prayer, the middle finger represents the mid-afternoon prayer, the ring finger represents the sunset prayer, and the little finger represents the evening prayer. As for the fingers of the left hand in a dream, they are interpreted to represent one’s nephews.

To cross or intertwine one’s fingers in a dream means difficulties and poverty. One’s toes in a dream represent the beauty of his character and denote his straightforwardness. Any defect or crookedness in them in a dream will mirror in wakefulness.

If a toe or a finger is bitten or crushed in a dream, it denotes evil or perhaps an accident. Ifone sees milk coming forth from his thumb and blood coming forth from his index finger in a dream, it means that he will marry a mother, then will he marry her daughter, or it could mean that he will rape the mother, then her daughter. Crackingone’s fingers in a dream means exchanging bad words between relatives or being sarcastic or making fun of other people.

If one’s fingers are paralyzed in a dream, it means that he has committed an awful sin.

If one sees his right hand paralyzed in a dream, it means injustice toward a weak person or inflicting losses upon an innocent person.

If one’s left hand is paralyzed in a dream, it means the death of his brother or sister. As for the fingernails in a dream, they denote beauty, courage, strength, a religious covenant, or money.

If one’s fingernails are chipped, extracted, or broken in a dream, they means loss of money and strength.

If they look nicely clipped in a dream, they mean both spiritual and material benefits. Long nails at the point of a near breaking in a dream mean distress, sorrow, fears and depression.

If one’s nail becomes a claw in a dream, it means rising against one’s enemy and opposition.

If one does not have fingernails in a dream, it means bankruptcy. Ifone’s fingernails turn yellow, green or blue or if they are broken in the dream, it means death. Clipping them in a dream means dispelling calamities or distress.

If a thorn or a chip of wooden enters under one’s fingernails in a dream, it means loss of power or money.

If one sees himself in a dream knocking his fingernails against his teeth in a dream, it means committing a despicable and a loathsome act. As for seeing one’s chest in a dream, if one sees himselfhaving a broad and a nice looking chest (See Chest), it means repentance of a sinner, or being eager and willing to follow the truth and to comply with it, or to make easy what was earlier difficult. One’s breasts in a dream (See Breast) represent his daughter. Man’s breast in a dream means a woman, and woman’s breasts in a dream represents a man. Breasts in a dream mean five things a little boy, a little girl, a servant, a friend, or a brother. One’s abdomen in a dream means money, children, relatives or prosperity. Ifone sees his abdomen being cut open and washed, then stitched back to normal in the dream, it means blessings from God Almighty, forgiveness for one’s sins, and it could mean that one will receive spiritual guidance. One’s abdomen in a dream also denotes his good conduct, amiable character, blessed enterprises and protection from the evil of the accursed Satan.

If one sees a newborn son or daughter coming out of his abdomen in a dream, it means that such a child will be born and will grow to govern that household. As for one’s livers in a dream, they represent knowledge, money or children.

If a man of knowledge sees his livers flying away from his body like birds in a dream, it means that he will forget his knowledge, or if one has children, they may die, or perhaps the government may seize his property even if he has nothing.

If one sees himself eating his own livers in a dream, it means earning his livelihood.

If they are cooked in the dream, then they represent a lawful income, or they could mean gobbling the property of one’s own children. Ifa liver is removed in a dream, it means the death of a child. Removing a liver in a dream also could mean injustice. One’s kidney in a dream means having a good business connection, dispelling adversities, distress, trouble, safety from danger, a husband and a wife, one’s parents, or it could represent two lovers. One’s kidneys in a dream also represent a strong, courageous and a hard working man who serves someone in authority, or he may become a personal guard, or an assistant to the governor. As for one’s lungs in a dream, they represent joy, happiness, or sorrow. Donating a lung to someone known or unknown in a dream means receiving happiness in return. Eating a broiled lung of a domesticated animal in a dream means profits. Otherwise, it could mean acquiring unlawful money. Seeing one’s lung torn in a dream means nearing one’s death. One’s spleen in a dream (See Spleen) represents money. As for seeing one’s intestines in a dream, they represent earnings, leadership, a child, unlawful money, intercession, hatred, livelihood, work or they could mean changing one’s mind about doing somethingwhich could cause a disaster. One’s stomach in a dream represents longevity, livelihood or children.

A healthy stomach in a dream means enjoying strength and a long life.

The same interpretation is given to the intestines or the umbilicus or the navel and the three of them represent one’s relationship with his wife. As for the ribs (See Ribs) in a dream, they represent women.

The loins or the spinal column in a dream represent one’s progeny. One’sback in a dream (See Back) represents his strength, wealth, glory, fame, master, destruction, end, poverty, old age and burdens.

If one sees himself carrying a heavy load in a dream, it means that he is carrying his sins.

If he carries merchandise in the dream, it means debt.

If he carries woods in the dream, it means backbiting others.

If one sees himself carrying a dead person on his back in a dream, it means that he takes care of orphans. As for one’s heart (See Heart) in a dream, it means intelligence, vigilance, awareness, guidance, clarity and piety. One’s buttocks and the rear end in a dream represent his earnings,job and profits.lfone sees himselflicking someone’s rear end or buttocks in the dream, it means giving high praises to an unworthy and an impious person or commending him.

The male and female sexual organs in a dream represent a good father or one’s profession. What comes or goes into the male organ or woman’s vagina in a dream of good or bad will reflect in their lives. Seeing one’s penis in a dream means children, money, pride, state, or authority.

The testicles represent one’s livelihood, one’s daughters, protection and maintenance.

The meaning of the penis and the testicles may be transposed in the dream interpretation. One’s anus in a dream means a pouch, a store, a resting place, or a coffer.

The knee represents one’s capital or one’s attendance to his work and earning his livelihood. As for the legs, they too represent one’s capital, paying attention to one’s work and conduct. Man’s leg represents a woman, and a woman’s leg represents a man. Ifone’s leg turns into wood or iron in a dream, it means that he will fail to earn his livelihood. One’s feet represent his parents, his livelihood, a journey or his wealth.

(See Feet; Foot).

If one foot is broken or cut off in a dream, it means either the death of a parent or loss of half of one’s capital.

If one’s feet turn into iron or copper in a dream, it means longevity.

If they turn into glass in the dream, they denote his short life.

The human bones represent his livelihood, religion, glory or money. Collecting bones in a dream means saving money.

The bone marrow in a dream represents hidden money, good awareness, patience and gratitude.

The veins and nerves in a dream represent one’s clan, modesty and progeny. As for seeing the human skin in a dream, it means ornaments, presiding over others, a veil, blessings, livelihood, provisions, life and a garment.


Also see Aorta; Face; Finger; Five fingers; Gall bladder; Heel; Jugular vein; Marrow; Nails; Palm; Pluck; Spleen; Teeth; Tongue; Tooth... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

NECK

In a dream, a neck represents an embrace, a donation with terms, a legal will or a conditional endowment.

The neck and the shoulders in a dream represent one’s trust or trustworthiness.

A healthy strong neck in a dream means trustworthiness and ability to repay one’s debts.

Wounds, festering, or purulence in one’s neck in a dream mean betraying God’s trust.

Ifone sees a nice bird sitting over his neck in a dream, it means benefits or an alibi.

If it is not a gentle bird, then it becomes a bad omen or a rebuke.

If one sees a necklace, a rope, a wire or a thread wrapped around his neck in a dream, it means fulfilling a promise, acquiring knowledge, status and honored.

(Also see Body)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

SHAVING THE HEAD

Dreaming of oneself as having shaved one’s head during the month of Hajj is a glad tiding that one will proceed for Hajj. But if such a dream is seen during any other month besides Hajj it means that his capital (in monetary terms) will become exhausted.

(This will be discussed in greater detail in this book).... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

TAVERN

A tavern in a dream means getting high after feeling low and depressed. It also means dispelling one’s strains and distress, or it could represents a prostitute, an abused woman, or adversities because of the damages and liabilities a tavern may bring.

If one promises to do something, then if he sees a tavern in his dream, the tavern then represents the terms of his agreement, or that he is engaged in a shabby or a covert action against his boss.

If a sick person sees himselfin a tavern in a dream, it means that his time is up. Ifa pious person sees himselfentering a tavern in a dream, it means that he may be lured into temptation.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

TORAH

Reciting the Torah but not recognizing what it is in a dream means that one may become a fatalist.

To own a copy of the Torah for a king or ruler in a dream means that he will conquer a land or make peace with its people on his terms.

If he is learned in real life, it means that either his knowledge will increase or that he will invent what is not ordained, or he may tend to lean toward jovial company. Seeing the Torah in a dream also means finding what is lost, welcoming a long awaited traveller, or it could represent someone who follows the Jewish faith. As for an unmarried person, owning a Torah in a dream means getting married to a woman from a different religion, or it could mean marrying a woman without her parents’ consent. Seeing the Torah in a dream also may mean extensive travels. Ifone’s wife is pregnant, it means that she will bear a child who resembles his father.

If one’s wife is pregnant, and if he sees himself holding the Torah in a dream, it means that she will beget a daughter, for the gender of the word Torah is feminine. It also means that he will mix with evil companions. Similar interpretations are given to carrying other scriptures.

To see the Torah, or the Evangel, or the Gospel in a dream is as though one has seen God’s Prophet Muhammad, upon whom be peace, because his name (uwbp) is mentioned in all three of them. It could also mean betrayal, negating a covenant, or desiring what is shoddy.... Islamic Dream Interpretation

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Islamic Dream Interpretation

AMBULANCE

In old dream dictionaries, dreaming about an ambulance could be labeled as a dream of warning. In more modern terms, your unconscious mind may by attempting to convey information that you have been unwilling to deal with consciously. Pay attention to your physical body and see if your health is an issue. Otherwise, this dream may be pointing to some urgent situation in your life. Consider all of the details in your dream. Examine your daily life and make an attempt to see if there is something that requires your immediate attention.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

WAR

Dreaming about a war or a battle suggests that the dreamer has internal conflict. One part of personality or psyche may be battling with another for control and the dream reflects this internal war. Another reason for dreaming about war is that you may be faced with a situation that requires you to be aggressive or assertive and to come to terms with opposition. War veterans and others who have experienced war first hand may, from time to time, have such dreams based on memory and trauma.... The Bedside Dream Dictionary

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The Bedside Dream Dictionary

ADVENTURE OF THE DREAMWORLD

Dreams give us a doorway into a strange and wonderful world. Although it appears to have many of the features of our waking world, such as peo­ple, animals, objects and places, it is nevertheless full of sub­tle surprises and differences.

To enter this world while asleep leaves us largely unaware of its possibilities.

To take waking awareness into our entrance, as happens when we explore a dream through dream processing, unfolds the magic impact of what we meet.

When we open the door of dreams in this way we begin a journey. It has stages, problems to surmount and things to learn, just like any journey. Many people have already trav­elled before us, and there are books such as Alice in Wonder­land, The Odyssey, Exploring Inner Space, and Altered States oj Consciousness which describe journeys and the terrain.

Although we might meet the heights of religious experi­ence as well as the depths of human despair on the journey, in simple terms it is primarily a journey into a confrontation with our own potential, our own fear, our own prison bars of thought and habit, our own ability to lift perception beyond what we have known before and look at the world, and our life in it, from new perspectives.

It is a journey towards greater maturity in which we face the humbling vision of our own littleness, the moving encounter with the vulnerable child we once were, the cleaning out of the store cupboards of resent­ment, hurt and anger, the D1Y of conscious renewal of our identity, and the meeting with Love as we experience ourself as a living participator in the wonder of life. We look at birth, we meet death, we gaze into the vast depths of space out of which our being has arisen. Then we find ourselves seeing the faces of the other human beings we live with, and recognising we are all on the journey, and we only have each other. Real­ising we are all waves on a shoreless sea—from no port we move to no destination—we understand our self responsibil­ity, and consider what we will to do with the momentum of our life. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

ANIMUS

The male within the female, shown as a man in a woman’s dreams. Physically a woman is predominantly fe­male, but also has a clitoris and produces some male hor­mones. Psychologically, we may only express part of our po­tential in everyday life. In a woman, the more physically dynamic, intellectual and socially challenging side of herself may be given less expression. Apart from this, some features, such as innovation and creative rational thought, may be held in latency. These secondary or latent characteristics are de­picted by the male in female dreams. In general we can say the man represents the woman’s mental and social power, her ability to act creatively in ‘the world’. It also holds in it an expression of her complex of feelings about men, gained as experience mostly from her relationship with—or lack of— father, but also from a synthesis of all her male contacts. So the whole realm of her expenence of the male can be repre­sented by the man in her dream, and is accessible through the image.

Good relationship with or marrying the man: shows the woman integrating her own ability to be independent and capable in outwardly active terms. This makes her more whole, balancing her ‘female’ qualities. It also shows the woman meeting her experience of her father in a healing way. This enables the woman to have a realistic relationship with an actual man. It also bnngs a sense of connectedness be­tween her conscious self and what she senses as the ‘commer­cial’ world. See father in this entry.

To be in conflict with the man, or unable to make real physical and pleasurable contact with him: suggests difficulty in meeting what may have been a painful or threatening expe­rience of father. This can lead to lack of ability to make clear judgments, and lack of decisiveness in areas outside feeling values. She is prone to acceptance of collective or long held social norms without question; family or national attitudes not applicable to present situations; and reasoning’ which actu­ally arises out of emotions connected to such family or social norms. Actual relations with men will be difficult, or entered into simply as a duty. Emotional or intimate merging with a man is threatening because it brings the woman close to the conflicts and pain connected with father. Sex may be possible but not a close feeling union. See man.

Christ Although people generally think of Christ as a histori­cal figure, in dreams Christ is not this at all. He is a powerful process in the human unconscious. In the west we give this process the name of Christ, but the process or archetype is universal and has various names in different cultures. Some­times represented in dreams as a fish or a big man, in general the Christ is an expression of the dreamer’s own potential— what they can become in their life. But it also depicts what might be called a sense of the forces of symbiosis or co­operative activity operative in human life and the cosmos. There are at least four aspects to Chrisi as depicted in dreams.

The Sunday school or Church Christ: depicts social norms, the generally accepted morals and social rules. This Christ’ comes about because the Church tends to represent tradi­tional values, and also the attempt to press people to live these values.

The dreamer may have a childlike relationship with this Christ or, if attempting to be self responsible, be in con­flict with it. Some people find this Christ has a castrating role in their life, and flee in horror. In fact this aspect of social indoctrination may lead to such a burden of guilt and sup­pression that it can create psychic cripples. Trying to do all the right’ things may lead us to the point where ‘we can’t say no to a glass of water without a pang of guilt*. Two of the great forces which push at the human soul or psyche are social pressure, such as the moral norm, and biological pressures, such as the sex drive, individuals may fight a lifelong battle with one or the other of these.

The social cnminal typifies battle with the first; the ascetic, battle with the second.

The ideal Christ: the psychological process which causes us not to take responsibility for our own highest ideals; our own yearnings for the good, our own most powerful urges arising against what we see as evils in the world. This influ­ences us to wait for a sign from Christ in our dream in order to gain authority, or to overcome the anxiety associated with the drive. We want God to say we should act in a cenain way because we are not willing to be self responsible. Example: I stood outside a castle. It was closed and guarded by soldiers in armour. Wondering how to get in I thought that if I dressed and acted as a soldier I would be allowed entrance. It worked and inside Christ met me and said he had important work for me to do’ (Sonia).

The closely guarded secret is Soma’s own impulse to do some son of socially creative work. She doesn’t want to acknowledge the impulse as her own; it is much easier if she can say ‘Christ told me to do this’. In this way she avoids direct encounter with opposition.

The unofficial Chnst. Example: A fierce battle was raging with bullets flying. I immediately fell down and played “dead”. It wasn’t that I was hurt in any way, but I didn’t want to be at any risk in the fight. As I lay there, I saw a tall well built man in soldier’s uniform walk to me. He gave no sign of any fear concerning the bullets, and quietly knelt beside me. I felt he was Christ, but was confused by him being a soldier. He placed a hand on my back and gradually worked his fin­gers under the shell of a large limpet type creature that I had never before known was parasitically attached to my back. I could feel him pull it away, but knew its tentacles still ran right into my chest. He then sat me up and told me how I could rid myself of the tentacles and so be healed’ (Peter Y).

Peter had a debilitating psychosomatic illness at the time of the dream, causing pain where the tentacles ran.

The shell is his defence against feeling his own hurts and inner conflicts.

The dream shows him contacting a strength which is not afraid of his internal battlefield of conflicts, and can show ways of healing real human problems.

The healing rests upon the dreamer’s conscious action, not Christ’s, suggesting the dreamer taking responsibility for his own situation. Peter real­ised he had been avoiding his own internal battlefield, but felt he had met a strength which would support his efforts to find healing. In fact he met his conflicts and grew beyond his ailments. Peter’s conflicts were between his love for his chil­dren and his sexuality. This Christ is our undammed life; the flood of loving sexuality; the strength to burst through social rules and regulations because love of life pushes us. It doesn’t give a hang about bullets, death, nght or wrong, because it has a sense of its own integral existence within life, and its own lightness and place in eternity.

The integral or cosmic Christ. Example: ‘I am a journalist reponing on the return of Christ. He is expected on a paddle steamer going upstream on a large river. I am very sceptical and watch disciples and followers gather on the rear deck.

The guru arrives, dressed in simple white robes. He has long, beautiful auburn hair and beard, and a gentle wise face. He begins to tap a simple rhythm on a tabla or Indian drum. It develops into complex intermingling of orchestral rhythms as everyone joins in. I now realise he is Christ, and feel over­whelmed with awe as I try to play my part in the music. I’m tapping with a pen and find myself fumbling.

A bottle or can opener comes to me from the direction of Christ. I try to beat a complementary rhythm, a small pan of a greater, universal music’ (Lester S).

Each of us has a sense of connectedness with the whole, with the cosmos. We may be little aware of this sense, our scepticism may deny it, as Lester’s was doing. But finding it can enrich the rest of our nature.

The sense bnngs with it a realisation of taking part in the unimaginably grand drama called life. It gives a feeling, no matter what the state of our body, crippled or healthy, that we have something that makes any faults in body or achievement insignificant. It doesn’t take all the difficulties out of life, but it is a good companion on the way. In dreams and religion Christ is also represented as the son of the Cosmos or God. This aspect of Christ is cosmic, from beyond the Earth. This is a process in the cosmos which the unconscious senses and presents under the image of Christ, or other figures in different religions.

It is possible that there is an innate process in human beings to do with love and symbiosis which humanity became aware of at a particu­lar stage in the development of consciousness. This becoming aware was expressed in what we know as the histoncal Jesus. See religion and dreams; the self within this entry. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

BIRTH

Woman’s dream: desire to have a baby. Man’s dream: envy of the creative ability of women. When we were born, one world of experience ended for us and another began. Binh in a dream has the same meaning.

The beginning of a new way of life; new attitude; new ability; new project. But also the death of the old. Can be about our own physical birth, its difficulties and trauma. But most difficult birth dreams are about coming to terms with our existence. Many of us are still wondering whether we wanted to be, or want to be, born. Lots of us live at a remove from life because of this.

Birth of a shining, talking or holy child: the beginning of awareness (not intellectual knowledge) of how the conscious self is interwoven with the forces and beings of the cosmos. Birth pains: the creative process; pain of arriving at a wider vision. Giving birth to a more mature self is a struggle; the new in our life is born out of such pains. See baby. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

CAYCE, EDGAR

Born in Hopkinsville, Kentucky on 18 March 1877, died Virginia Beach, January 1945. Cayce was an uned­ucated man who found he could put himself into a sleep state in which he had access to a collective mind or universal con­sciousness. Cayce was a very Christian man and couched his statements in a Biblical manner. In his sleep state, however, he could verbally respond to people’s questions and, using medical terms he did not know consciously, diagnose illness in people, even at a distance; speak foreign languages he had never learnt; get information he had no conscious access to. Because of this he was asked to the White House twice. At one period a hospital was built in which he worked with six doctors, diagnosing from his sleep condition. In this state, when asked how he could get information about the past, about people at a distance, etc., he replied that every person has access to what he called the cosmic mind while they sleep, but few people can bring this contact through to con­scious expression. He also maintained that prolonged working with one’s dreams gradually made conscious this contact with our cosmic life.

For Cayce, humans are cosmic beings.

A life­time was a brief interlude of learning in an eternal pilgrimage through time and space.

The conscious personality we so often raise so high is but a temporary experience assumed by an older larger being, the Individuality, or Self as Jung called it.

The ego dies at death, but the Individuality absorbs its experience. Dreams are the meeting point between this older self and the personality it assumes but briefly.

(Cayce’s biog­raphy is There Is A River by Thomas Sugrue. Cayce dictated 14 million words from his sleep state; a record of these is kept at the Association for Research and Enlightenment, Virginia Beach, Va.) ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DEAD PEOPLE DREAMS

Example: ‘My husband’s mother, no longer alive, came and slid her arms carefully under me and lifted me up. I shouted “Put me down! Put me down! I don’t want to go yet.” She carefully lowered me on to the bed and disappeared’ (EH). Most dreams in which dead people appear are expressive of our attempts to deal with our feelings, guilt or anger in connection with the person who died, or our own feelings about death. In the example the dreamer is feeling fear about being carried off by death.

When someone close to us dies we go through a period of change from relating to them as an external reality, to meeting and accepting them as alive in our memories and inner life. In the next example the man has not only come to terms with his mother’s and his own death, but also found this inner reality. Example: A dark grey sugar loaf form materialised. This pillar lightened in shade as I watched. It didn’t move. I began to think it was Mrs Molten who died in 1956.

The feeling grew stronger but still the colour lightened. Then it bent over and kissed my head. In that instant I knew it was my mother.

An ecstatic joy and happiness such as I have never known on earth suffused me. That happiness remained constantly in mind for the next few days’ (Mr M). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DEATH AND REBIRTH

The symbols of death or the fear of death can be: sunset; evening; a crossed river or falling in a river, a skeleton; snarling dogs; sleep; anaesthetic; gravestones; ceme­tery; blackness, or something black; ace of spades; a fallen mirror; stopped clock; a pulled tooth; an empty abyss, the chill wind; falling leaves; a withering plant; an empty house; a lightning-struck tree; coffin; struggling breaths; the dead ani­mal in the gutter; the rotting carcass, underground; the depths of the sea; the Void.

What lies beyond death is conjecture, but the archetype of death we are considering is not completely about physical death.

It is about our observation of it in others; our concep­tions of it gained from our culture and our impressions; the feelings which generate around our experiences and thoughts; our attempts to deal with our own aging and approach to death, plus what material the deeper strata of our unconscious release regarding it.

It is about how our sense of conscious personal existence meets the prospect of its disintegration.

Unless we can come to terms with what is behind the haunting images of death we meet in our dreams, we fail to live fully and daringly, we are too haunted by death lurking in the shadows of injury and the unknown. Images of death and the associated emotions, carried within for years, can have a negative influence on our health. Coming to terms means the courage to feel the emotions of fear or chill and discover them for what they are—emotions. They are certainly not death, only our feelings about it.

The differences shown in the two following examples illustrate the avoiding and the meeting. Example: 4So to get to the bedroom I had to jump across this gap. I tried to jump but missed and I fell and hit the bottom.

The next thing I remember was I was floating up. I looked down and saw myself lying face down with arms spread out and I suddenly realised I was dead. I was so frightened that I woke up. I had the feelings of fear of dying, but I felt no pain’ (Cath). Example: “Suddenly I was in a huge underground cav­ern. It was hundreds of feet high and as wide. It had two great statues in it, both to do with death.

The whole place overpow­ered me with a sense of decay and skeletal death, darkness, underground, earth, the end. I cried out in the dismal cave, “Death, where is your sting! Grave, where is your victory!” I immediately had the sense of being a bodiless awareness. I knew this was what occurred at death. Fear and the sense of decay left me’ (Andrew).

Summarising these and many other dreams, it is not only the accumulated images of death, but also bodilessness and loss of power and identity which bring so much fear. There are two antipodes of human experience. At the tip of one is focused self-determining self consciousness. At the tip of the other is unfocused void without identity. Strangely enough we experience both each day in some degree—the first while awake, the second when we sleep. Yet to face the second with consciousness feels like all the horrors of death and loss. Yet facing it is important, especially to the second half of life.

The symbols of rebirth are: the cave; an egg; spring; the tree; the cross; dawn; emerging out of the sea; the snake; the bird; a seed; arising from the earth or faeces; green shoot from a dead branch; phoenix; flame; a pearl; the womb. Rebirth is as difficult to face as death. It holds within it not just the memones of the struggles and difficulties of our own physical birth and growth, but also the challenge of becoming the un­known future, the dark possibility, the new.

The dream of Andrew in the underground cavern is an example of positive rebirth. After realising himself as bodiless awareness he emerges from the cave and finds himself near a tree. Example: ‘A tremendous jolt of power poured into me from the tree. I saw that we had arrived at a place where a line of trees, about a 100 yards in length, stood very close together in a slight semicircle on the top of a bank.

The trees had great spiritual power and the place was a holy temple. Two spiritual beings were there—an ancient Earth Being, and Christ’ (Andrew).

The next example is of a dream typical of meeting memo­ries of physical birth. As can be seen, the experience is pow­erful enough to cause physical shaking. Example: All I can see of what I enter is a very narrow space with a light showing through. But immediately I enter I realise I have made a mis­take for I am being forced swiftly through a dark, very narrow tunnel. I feel pain as I am dragged along and I hear loud banging noises which frighten me, but although they are loud they seem to come from inside my head. I feel terrified and breathless and very relieved when I wake before reaching the end of the tunnel. In fact as I write this account I am shiver­ing” (female, anon). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

DISPLACEMENT

Displacement of aggression from a threaten­ing target to a less threatening one is a common human and animal practice.

If we are angry at our partner we may kick the cat or nag at the children instead of confronting the real target. Freud stated that in dreams we express what we usually censor, or would be censored socially, in terms of behaviour or sexuality, but often in a displaced way. What appears to be most important and full of emotion in the dream may, accord­ing to this statement, be really of least significance. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

EMOTIONS, MOOD

There is a level of human experience which is typified by intense emotional and physical response to life. Such emotions and bodily drives may remain almost entirely unconscious until touched by exploring our dream content in the right setting. When such feelings and bodily movements arise, as they do in dreams, we may be amazed at their power and clarity. See dream processing; sleep move­ments.

If we take away the images and events occurring in a dream and simply look to see what feelings or emotions are evident, the dream is often more understandable than if we try to interpret the symbols. Feelings in dreams are nearly always undistoned. We therefore do not need to interpret them, sim­ply to acknowledge them and see if we can recognise where they occur in waking life.

The images in a dream may be the way we unconsciously pictorialise our flux of feelings and the play of internal energy flows.

For instance love or sexual drive can give rise to physical movement—as in sexual intercourse. Repression of sex or love also represses such physical move­ments, leading to tension and conflict, which might be pre­sented in the drama of a dream.

Example: ‘I was with my wife, walking along a street, on holiday with her. But I felt awful tension. It was the son of stress I feel when I have turned off my sexual flow—as I have at the moment’ (Brian V). Brian can easily see the connection between the dream feelings and his everyday life, although sometimes we need to practise this. But the situation could as easily be expressed as a dream image of a blocked river.

The underlying feelings would then be less easy to grasp.

Example: ‘I was in a very ancient crumbling building, con­fronted by a large stone door, deeply engraved with many designs and creatures. I began to open the door and felt high feelings of anxiety. I realised this was an initiation and I must calm my feelings in order to pass beyond the door, i.e. if I were controlled by my feelings I would run away’ (Derek F). How we meet the emotions in our dreams illustrates our ha­bitual method of dealing with them.

The feelings of anxiety in Derek’s dream were met and moved beyond, but this is un­usual. This is because most of us change our direction as soon as there is a hint of fear.

The amount of nicotine and alcohol human beings consume suggests how poorly we meet anxiety. Going beyond fear or pain is an initiation which opens doors for us. We might now apply for the job, ask for the date, raise the issue, express the creativity, make the journey abroad, which anxiety previously kept us from. We see this in the next example: I had a ring on my marriage finger. It was a thin band of gold. I woke up frightened’ (Angela). Angela is not married and feels anxiety about the commitment.

Dreams give us a safe area to express emotions which might be difficult or dangerous to release socially. Anger in a dream may be expressing what we failed to express in a wak­ing encounter, or it might be our habitual response. It may also be directed against ourself. Dreams also contain many positive emotions. Sometimes they present a new aspect of feeling which is life enhancing.

A person who habitually felt at odds with her father and relatives experienced a dream in which she felt forgiveness for the first time. This was entirely new for her and led to a reconciliation with her family.

Some feeling states in a dream are subtle, and may be more evident in terms of the symbols than the feelings.

A grey drear environment suggests depression and lack of pleasure.

A sunny light environment with flowers and colour shows plea­sure and good feelings.

A country landscape depicts quite a different feeling state to a smoky busy city street. We can define these for ourself using the techniques described under dream processing.

Whatever feelings or emotions we meet in our dreams, many of them are bound to be habitual responses we have to life. Where these habits are negative we can begin to change them by working with the dream images as described in the last question under dream processing. See love; hostility. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

GLASSES, SPECTACLES

Ability to see, understand—or lack of it; a way of hiding oneself, as behind sunglasses. Terms like ‘shortsighted’ or ‘longsighted’ help to understand the use of glasses in a dream. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

GOLD

The best or most valuable in oneself or in opportunity, what stands the ‘acid test’ or does not tarnish with time, in terms of personal qualities, such as love, patience or care in work; something you value or want in your life.

If cheap, false, tarnished: something you valued but does not deserve respect. See gold under colours. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

INDIVIDUATION

One of Carl Jung s most interesting areas of thought is that of individuation. In a nutshell the word refers to the processes involved in becoming a self-aware human being.

The area of our being we refer to when we say T, ‘me’ or ‘myself’ is our conscious self awareness, our sense of self, which Jung calls the ego.

The autobiography of Helen Keller has helped in understanding what may be the difference be­tween an animal and a human being with self awareness. Helen, made blind and deaf through illness before learning to speak, lived in a dark unconscious world lacking any self awareness until the age of seven, when she was taught the deaf and dumb language. At first her teacher’s fingers touch­ing hers were simply a tactile but meaningless experience. Then, perhaps because she had leamt one word prior to her illness, meaning flooded her darkness. She tells us that ‘noth­ingness was blotted out’. Through language she became a person and developed a sense of self, whereas before there had been nothing.

The journey of individuation is not only that of becoming a person, but also expanding the boundaries of what we can allow ourselves to experience as an ego. As we can see from an observation of our dreams, but mostly from an extensive exploration of their feeling content, our ego is conscious of only a small area of experience.

The fundamental life pro­cesses in one’s being may be barely felt. In many contempo­rary women the reproductive drive is talked about as some­thing which has few connections with their personality. Few people have a living, feeling contact with their early child­hood, in fact many people doubt that such can exist. Because of these factors the ego can be said to exist as an encapsulated small area of consciousness, surrounded by huge areas of ex­perience it is unaware of.

In a different degree, there exists in each of us a drive towards the growth of our personal awareness, towards greater power, greater inclusion of the areas of our being which remain unconscious.

A paradox exists here, because the urge is towards integration, yet individuation is also the process of a greater self differentiation. This is a spontaneous process, just as is the growth of a tree from a seed (the tree in dreams often represents this process of self becoming), but our personal responsibility for our process of growth is neces­sary at a certain point, to make conscious what is uncon­scious.

Because dreams are constantly expressing aspects of indi­viduation it is wonh knowing the main areas of the process. Without sticking rigidly to Jungian concepts—which see indi­viduation as occurring from mid-life onwards in a few individuals—aspects of some of the main stages are as fol­lows. Early babyhood—the emergence of self consciousness through the deeply biological, sensual and gestural levels of experience, all deeply felt; the felt responses to emerging from a non-changing world in the womb to the need to reach out for food and make other needs known. Learning how to deal with a changing environment, and otherness in terms of rela­tionship.

Childhood—learning the basics of motor, verbal and social skills, the very basics of physical and emotional indepen­dence. One faces here the finding of strength to escape the domination of mother—difficult, because one is dependent upon the parent in a very real way—and develop in the psyche a satisfying sexual connection. In dream imagery this means, for the male, an easy sexual relationship with female dream figures, and a means of dealing with male figures in competition (father); see sex in dreams.

The dream of the mystic beautiful woman precedes this, a female figure one blends with in an idealistic sense, but who is never sexual.

The conflict with father—really the internal struggle with one’s image of father as more potent than self—when re­solved becomes an acceptance of the power of one’s own manhood. Women face a slightly different situation.

The woman’s first deeply sensual and sexual love object—in a bonded parent-child relationship—was her mother. So be­neath any love she may develop for a man lies the love for a woman. Whereas a man, in sexual love which takes him deeply into his psyche, may realise he is making love to his mother, a woman in the same situation may find her father or her mother as the love object. In the unconscious motivations which lead one to choose a mate, a man is influenced by the relationship he developed with his mother, a woman is influ­enced by both mother and father in her choice. Example: ‘I went across the road to where my mother’s sister lived. I wanted to cuddle her and touch her bare breasts, but we never seemed to manage this. There were always interruptions or blocks.’ (Sid L).

At these deep levels of fantasy and desire, one has to recog­nise that the first sexual experience is—hopefully—at the mother’s breast. This can be transformed into later fantasies/ dreams/desires of penis in the mouth, or penis in the vagina, or penis as breast, mouth as vagina.

For most of us, however, growth towards maturity does not present itself in such primi­tively sexual ways, simply because we are largely unconscious of such factors. In general we face the task of building a self image out of the influences, rich or traumatic, of our experi­ence. We leam to stand, as well as we may, amidst the welter of impressions, ideas, influences and urges, which constitute our life and body. What we inherit, what we experience, and what we do with these creates who we are.

One of the major themes of individuation is the journey from attachment and dependence towards independence and involved detachment. This is an overall theme we mature in all our life. In its widest sense, it pertains to the fact that the origins of our consciousness lie in a non-differentiated state of being in which no sense of T exists. Out of this womb condi­tion we gradually develop an ego and personal choice. In fact we may swing to an extreme of egotism and materialistic feel­ings of independence from others and nature.

The observable beginnings of this move to independence are seen as our at­tempt to become independent of mother and father. But de­pendence has many faces: we may have a dependent relation­ship with husband or wife; we may depend upon our work or social status for our self confidence; our youth and good looks may be the things we depend upon for our sense of who we are, our self image. With the approach of middle and old age we will then face a crisis in which an independence from these factors is necessary for our psychological equilibnum.

The Hindu practice of becoming a sanyassin, leaving behind family, name, social standing, possessions, is one way of meeting the need for inner independence from these in order to meet old age and death in a positive manner. Most people face it in a quieter, less demonstrative way. Indeed, death might be thought of as the greatest challenge to our identifica­tion with body, family, worldly status and the external world as a means to identity. We leave this world naked except for the quality of our own being.

Meeting oneself, and self responsibility, are further themes of individuation.

The fact that our waking self is a small spot­light of awareness amidst a huge ocean of unconscious life processes creates a situation of tension, certainly a threshold or ‘iron curtain’, between the known and unknown.

If one imagines the spotlighted area of self as a place one is standing in, then individuation is the process of extending the bound­ary of awareness, or even turning the spotlight occasionally into the surrounding gloom. In this way one places together impressions of what the light had revealed of the landscape in which we stand, clues to how we got to be where we are, and how we relate to these. But one may remain, or choose to remain, largely unconscious of self.

The iron curtain may be defended with our desire not to know what really motivates us, what past hurts and angers we hide. It may be easier for us to live with an exterior God or authority than to recognise the ultimate need for self responsibility and self cultivation.

To hide from this, humanity has developed innumerable escape routes—extenonsed religious practice, making scapegoats of other minority groups or individuals, rigid belief in a political system or philosophy, search for samadhi or God as a final solution, suicide. This aspect of our matunng process shows itself as a paradox (common to maturity) of becoming more sceptical, and yet finding a deeper sense of self in its connec­tions with the cosmos. We lose God and the beliefs of humanity’s childhood, yet realise we are the God we searched for. This meeting with self, in all its deep feeling of connec­tion, its uncertainty, its vulnerable power, is not without pain and joy. Example: ‘On the railway platform milled hundreds of people, all men I think. They were all ragged, thin, dirty and unshaven. I knew I was among them. I looked up at the mountainside and there was a guard watching us. He was cruel looking, oriental, in green fatigues. On his peaked cap was a red star. He carried a machine gun. Then I looked at the men around me and I realised they were all me. Each one had my face. I was looking at myself. Then I felt fear and terror’ (Anon).

The last of the great themes of individuation is summed up in William Blake’s words ‘1 must Create a System, or be en- slav’d by another Man’s; I will not Reason and Compare: my business is to Create.’ A function observable in dreams is that of scanning our massive life experience (even a child’s life experience has millions of bits of information) to see what it says of life and survival. Out of this we unconsciously create a working philosophy of what life means to us.

It is made up not only of what we have experienced and learnt in the gen­eral sense, but also from the hidden information in the cul­tural riches we have inherited from literature, music, art, the­atre and architecture.

The word hidden” is used because the unconscious ‘reads’ the symbolised information in these sources. It is, after all, the master of imagery in dreams. But unless we expand the boundaries of our awareness we may not know this inner philosopher.

If we do get to know it through dreams, we will be amazed by the beauty of its in­sight into everyday human life.

In connection with this there is an urge to be, and perhaps to procreate oneself in the world. Sometimes this is experi­enced as a sense of frustration—that there is more of us than we have been able to express, or to make real. While physical procreation can be seen as a physical survival urge, this drive to create in other spheres may be an urge to survive death as an identity. Dreams frequently present the idea that our sur­vival of death only comes about from what we have given of ourself to others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

LUCIDITY, AWAKE IN SLEEP

Sometimes in the practice of deep relaxation, meditation or sensory deprivation, our being enters into a state akin to sleep, yet we maintain a personal waking awareness. This is like a journey into a deep interior world of mind and body where our senses no longer function in their waking manner, where the brain works in a different way, and where awareness is introverted in a degree we do not usually experience. It can be a frightening world, simply because we are not accustomed to it. In a similar way a measure of waking awareness can arise while dreaming. This is called lucid dreaming. During it we can change or wilfully direct what is happening in the dream in a way not usual to the dream state.

Example: 4I had backed my car into a big yard, a commer­cial area. My wife, two of my sons and I got out of the car. As we stood in the yard talking I realised there was a motorbike where my car should be. I said to everyone, “There was a car here a moment ago, now it’s a motorbike. Do you know what that means? It means we are dreaming.” Mark my son was now with us, and my ex-wife. I asked them if they realised they were dreaming. They got very vague and didn’t reply. I asked them again and felt very clearly awake’ (William V). William’s is a fairly typical lucid dream, but there are features which it does not illustrate. During the days or weeks prior to a lucid dream, many people experience an increase in flying dreams.

The next example shows another common feature.

Example: In many of my dreams I become aware that I am dreaming. Also, if anything unpleasant threatens me in the dream I get away from it by waking myself (Alan). Lucidity often has this feature of enabling the dreamer to avoid un­pleasant elements of the dream.

The decision to avoid any unpleasant internal emotions is a common feature of a per­son’s conscious life, so this aspect of lucidity is simply a way of taking such a decision into the dream. Some writers even suggest it as a way of dealing with frightening dreams. Avoid­ance does not solve the problem, it simply pushes the emo­tion deeper into the unconscious where it can do damage more surreptitiously. Recent findings regarding suppressed gnef and stress, which connects them with a higher incidence of cancer, suggests that suppression is not a healthy way of dealing with feelings.

Another approach to lucidity is that it can be a son of playground where one can walk through walls, jump from high buildings and fly, change the sofa into an attractive lover, and so on. True, the realisation that our dream life is a differ­ent world and that it does have completely different principles at work than our waking world is imponant. Often people introven into their dream life the morals and fears which are only relevant to being awake in physical life.

To avoid a charging bull is cenainly imponant in waking life. In our dream life, though, to meet its charge is to integrate the enor­mous energy which the bull represents, an energy which is our own but which we may have been avoiding or running away’ from previously. Realising such simple differences revolutionises the way we relate to our own internal events and possibilities.

To treat lucid dreams as if they offered no other attainable expenence than to manipulate the dream en­vironment, or avoid an encounter, is to miss an amazing fea­ture of human potential.

Example: ‘In my dream I was watching a fern grow. It was small but opened out very rapidly. As I watched I became aware that the fern was simply an image representing a pro­cess occurring within myself which I grew increasingly aware of as I watched. Then I was fully awake in my dream and realised that my dream, perhaps any dream, was an expres­sion of actual and real events occurring in my body and mind. I felt enormous excitement, as if I were witnessing something of great importance’ (Francis P).

It is now acceptable, through the work of Freud, Jung and many others, to consider that within images of the dream lie valuable information about what is occurring within the dreamer, perhaps unconsciously. Strangely, though, it is almost never considered that one can have direct perception into this level of internal ‘events’ with­out the dream. What Francis describes is an experience of being on the cusp of symbols and direct perception. Consider­ing the enormous advantage of such direct information gath­ering, it is surprising it is seldom mentioned except in the writings of Corriere and Han, The Dream Makers.

Example: After defining why I had not woken in sleep recently, i.e. loss of belief, I had the following experience. I awoke in my sleep and began to see, without any symbols, that my attitudes and sleep movements expressed a feeling of restrained antagonism or irritation to my wife. I could also observe the feelings were arising from my discipline of sexual­ity. Realising I did not want those feelings I altered them and woke enough to turn towards her’ (Francis P). After the first of his direct perception dreams, Francis attempted to use this function again, resulting in the above, and other, such dreams. Just as classic dream interpretation says that the dream symbols represent psychobiological logical processes which might be uncovered by dream processing, what we see in Francis’ lucidity is a direct route to self insight, and through it a rapid personal growth to improved life experience. Such dreams provide not only psychological insight, but very fre­quently a direct perception of processes occurring in the body, as the following example illustrates.

Example: ‘Although deeply asleep I was wide awake with­out any shape or form. I had direct experience, without any pictures, of the action of the energies in my body. I had no awareness of body shape, only of the flow of activities in the organs. I checked over what I could observe, and noticed a tension in my neck was interfering with the flow and ex­change of energies between the head and trunk. It was also obvious from what I could see that the tension was due to an attitude I had to authority, and if the tension remained it could lead to physical ill health’ (Tony C).

An effective way to develop lucidity is frequently to con­sider the events of waking life as if they were a dream. Try to see events as one might see dream symbols. What do they mean in terms of one’s motivations, fears, personal growth? What do they suggest about oneself? For instance a person who works in a photographic darkroom developing films and prints might see they were trying to bnng to consciousness the latent—unconscious—side of themselves.

A banker might feel they were working at how best to deal with their sexual and personal resources. In this way one might actually apply what is said in this dream dictionary to one’s outer circumstances.

The second instruction is, on waking, at a convenient mo­ment, imagine oneself standing within one’s recent dream. As you get a sense of this dream environment, realise that you are taking waking awareness into the dream. From the standpoint of being fully aware of the dream action and events, what will you now do in and with the dream? Re-dream it with con­sciousness.

For example the things you run from in your nor­mal dreaming you could now face. See dream processing for fun her suggestions. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

PAST

lives While there may be some evidence for reincarna­tion in the work of Dr Ian Stevenson, dreams which clearly state reincarnation in their theme most likely represent pres­ent life situations.

Example: ‘I dream of living in China, a long time ago. I was married to a man with whom I had two children. He began to tire of me and brought concubines into our house­hold. I hated him. When I woke I realised I had dreamt about a past life’ (Patricia L). Patricia had in fact been married to a man in this life who, after her two children were born, began to bring other women home. This broke up their marriage. From Patricia’s point of view, this happened because in a past life her husband and she had not resolved their difficulties, so had to meet them again in this lifetime—whatsoever ye sow, so shall ye reap. Where such dreams have been thoroughly explored, I have found that their imagery arises from emotions and trauma which the dreamer finds difficult to meet. Placing it in a past life enables one to avoid the difficulty of experienc­ing present life pain. Patricia says she hated her Chinese hus­band.

The dream process can create a drama to represent our present situation using any form of structure. It is, after all, the master dramatist. This function of the unconscious explains many ‘past life’ memories elicited by hypnotic regression. Most of them are explainable in terms of present life trauma or situation. See hallucination, hallucinogens. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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TALKING

Sense of being in contact with whatever is depicted, expressing what one feels and thinks, standing up for what one believes or feels strongly about. Difficulty in speaking, not speaking: restrained anger or difficult feelings; anxiety or lack of confidence; absence of real contact or communication. Speaking and not being understood: feeling of not being lis­tened to; frustration. Idioms: on speaking terms; know some­one to speak to; nothing to speak of; speak as one finds, speak for someone; speak out; speaks for itself; speak volumes, speak with forked tongue; speak one’s mind. See also mouth under body; silence. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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AGE (OLD MAN OR OLD WOMAN)

Happiness and satisfaction have been reached. On one hand, you are fascinated by age, because it implies maturity, experience, and the ability to judge. On the other hand, it represents fear of getting old. Are you afraid of being less attractive? It is the archetype of wisdom.

The question here is: What is really important in your life and where do you want to go from here? How do you see yourself? In practical terms, this is mostly a question of taking life and its problems and fears more calmly.

The old man / old woman is and always has been the symbol of the teacher. Often, it also represents the grandfather or grandmother of the dreamer or even the dreamer him / herself. This image may also express a desire for greater peacefulness. Standing at the outside of society looking in, like the Alchemist. Gaining freedom since one has nothing to lose.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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BELT

The belt indicates the place where love and beauty (and the fascination with it) reside.

The belt (waist), as a physical expression of the connection between the conscious and unconscious, asks us to decide if we want to walk the path of physical urges and drives or the path of the spiritual. Ideally, both paths lead to harmony and balance between body and soul. This image also asks how we deal with sensuousness and the pleasures of life.

The image, however, usually appears when we feel restricted and bothered by something.

If that were not the case, our unconscious would see no reason to produce such an image.

For that reason, the belt usually points to restrictions imposed by the spouse (often the wife).

The belt is a symbol of power, strength, and the influence of the woman (as in the Nibelungen Ring—the belt of Kriemhilde—or the belt of the Queen of the Amazons in Greek mythology). In today’s terms, the belt is clearly a sign of repressed emotions, particularly sexual repression, for men as well as for women.

If the belt appears in the dream of a woman, it is usually a symbol of virtue and purity; in the dream of a man, it is energy and fertility.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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CHALICE

Important here is how you categorize this object: Mug, Goblet, Glass, or even Grail. Different terms refer to different moods and points of view and lead to different interpretations.

If seen as a chalice, it always indicates something extraordinary (it is not just a simple mug or a glass used every day!). It may either represent suffering or death (the “hemlock cup” of antiquity, for example) or the search for a higher goal (legend of the Grail and the magnificent interpretation by Emma Jung in her book The Legend of the Grail As Seen in Depth Psychology).

A chalice holds the liquid that is the equivalent of our emotions and needs.

The image of the chalice implies that these emotions and needs are spiritual in nature. Figuratively speaking, it is a matter of nurturing the soul and cultivating the emotions. That was precisely the task of the search for the Grail in the Middle Ages. In Christianity, the chalice is connected with the heart and blood of Christ.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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DEATH / KILLING

If it is the dreamer dying, it never has any connection to a real impending physical death. Rather, it is a reference to the need to change one’s path in life and allow old attitudes to die. Death usually means that radical change is necessary.

Basically, there are eight different levels of this symbol:

1. An indication that a necessary end has come to a certain phase.

It is a transition to something new.

2. The desire to shed something (attitudes, behavior, situation, etc.).

3. A suggestion to come to terms with death and the fear of death, meaning a search for fulfillment and productivity.

4. A limit has been reached and there is an inability to know how to go beyond that limit.

5. A suggestion to take better care of one’s health.

6. Something is dying inside.

7. A close connection with somebody deceased.

8. A desire for peace, solitude, and harmony (“the death of fear”).

According to Jung, dreaming about death means letting go of something that has died; it is a symbol of transformation and a new beginning.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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FILE

Coming to terms with something difficult that you want to smooth out, as in Iron.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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GLASS HOUSE

Greenhouse. Protection, as in Glass Wall.

A message to be more open and transparent. Similar to the Container in which transformation and growth takes place, in people as well as plants.

The uterus.

The glass coffin in 4tSnow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” In mythological terms, a glass house is also seen as a sweat lodge, where the transformation of the prince takes place.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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LEAF (OF A PLANT)

Being subjected to changes, or Letting Go. Similar to Abyss, Brook / Stream, and sometimes Parachute, only in more playful terms.

A wilted leaf means troubles.

A green leaf means rejuvenation, fulfillment of a wish.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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MAZE

From a mythological point of view, the image of the maze is closely tied to the Greek hero Theseus and to Ariadne, who loves him. As legend has it, in order to slay the virgin-devouring monster in the center of the maze of Crete, Ariadne gives to Theseus a magical red thread that will help him find his way out of the maze after he has slain the monster.

The maze symbolizes the womb of the Earth Mother and the cosmic order, which each of us has to create within ourself. And that is your task! The path is like a maze; after many twists and turns you finally reach your goal, where you can fulfill your obligations and responsibilities, find your shadow, and come to terms with it. Every time you dream about a maze you are challenged to come to terms with the monster within yourself.

On the other hand, the image of the maze points to a mother complex: if you cannot let go of the feminine, you are lost in it, which means the masculine in you loses its identity. And if this masculine identity is devoured by the feminine, the feminine cannot find its own identity because it doesn’t have access to it, and you cannot find your way out of the maze.

The symbol of the maze probably goes back to observations made about how the sun or the moon is traveling across the sky. In the center of the maze resides death, where the sun and the moon are at their lowest point. After we have met death, we leave the maze in the same way as Theseus. Our modern world, the metropolitan big city, the asphalt jungle, where people are easily getting lost and feeling trapped, is often compared with the maze. What is addressed here is the idea that our lives have become so complex that it is difficult for us to find our way. See Food (stored), Thread, Dragon.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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NATIVE AMERICAN

In the past, adventurous and immature, fleeing from reality and the world. This symbol, in a man s dream, is similar to the Hero. Today we interpret this image in terms of wholeness: we all live in one world and all of us are dependent, collectively, on Mother Earth.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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PARLIAMENT

Points to your social abilities and desire for advancement.

An indication of coming to terms with other people and the voice inside you.

It is a symbol of governing and points to the need to coordinate your own qualities. How are you putting together your emotions and intellect7 How do you “rule” yourself and others7... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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PERFUME

Wanting to look good and be seen in positive terms, loved, and accepted. Addresses the power of attraction and subtle radiance. Like the fragrance of a perfume that evaporates quickly, your understanding of yourself and others is difficult to maintain. On the other hand, making a definite statement (with a fragrance) about your presence, the scent of the perfume expresses sexuality and fantasies.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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PULPIT / COCKPIT / PLATFORM

In dreams these terms take on different meanings. As a pulpit in church the symbol might point to increased problems and hypocrisy.

It is either your bad conscience that is speaking to you or a suggestion that you are following moral standards too rigidly.

As an airplane cockpit, and as a politician in government, these images also stand for leadership. Among others, they represent personal skills. Often there is a hint to guide yourself more forcefully toward your goals.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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SCALE

Power of judgment.

The dreamer’s weight in terms of personal influence and significance. Assessment, judgment, balance, and order. Where is the center of your life? What is important? Vocal complaint about life’s ambiguity and what is unknown and unclear.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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SHADOW

The shadow is, first of all, that which is invisible.

If it becomes visible in your dream, a very important step toward increasing awareness has been taken.

You are beginning to become consciously aware of your “dark side.” The reason for the shadow in a dream is a sign that you are in the process of becoming aware of your Self. So, there is no reason to fear your shadow or try to avoid it.

The shadow is usually connected to the past or the future: old injuries are casting their shadow onto today’s behavior and emotions, and creating fear for the yet unborn reality of the future. Coming to terms with the shadow is necessary in order to understand life here and now. It brings intensity, wealth, and imagination to life.

If you are standing in somebody’s shadow, or are put into a shadow by somebody, this refers to low self- esteem. You have an inferiority complex—want to appear to be more than you are, want to be more accepted.

The shadow follows us but is not easily seen; it also provides protection.

Jung sees the shadow as an underdeveloped structure in people.

The shadow is one of the original definitions of the soul.

The chieftain of some Polynesian tribes loses his mana (power), if somebody steps on his shadow. In southern European countries midday was considered the ghost hour, because the shadow would then be its smallest and retreat. Behind this superstition was the fear that the shadow would disappear altogether and with it the soul and its relationship to the earth.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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THREE

Three is tense, dynamic, rhythmic, and complete (the Holy Trinity). Three is a symbol of the spirit, since it is assigned to the third stage of human consciousness (after the physical and emotional). In the Middle East, three is considered a holy number.

It is always connected to time: past, present, future. In ancient Rome the Fates almost always appear as three goddesses. Since ancient times femininity has been seen in three aspects: the virgin (Artemis), the woman (Hera), and the old woman (Hekate). Faust calls out three times until Mephisto appears. Peter denies Christ three times. Doing the same thing three times has magical effects— it represents the connection to reality.

According to Freud, refers to male genitalia. Jung considers three a mystical number; the three servants of the Queen of the Night in The Magic Flute; the three witches in Macbeth; the three wishes that are free. All this relates back, as do many god-trinities, to the original trinity: father-mother-son.

It is the male child, since the number three, according to Western tradition, is uneven and, as a prime number, a genuine male number. In this tradition, the male child is seen first in terms of male fertility.

According to Jung, the number three is connected to the diabolical.

The den of craving in alchemy is depicted by a three-headed snake.

The three-headed snake in mythology is always Satan. Also, according to Jung, three belongs to the young; and in ancient China and the Greek patriarchy, it points to masculine attributes and their function.

On the other hand, Three as a feminine number is part of the tradition in the area of the Mediterranean, through the veneration of Mary in Catholicism and the rediscovery of the matriarchy. Also, Goethe’s play Faust, Part II, ends with a prayer to the great goddess appearing threefold: “Virgin, Mother, Queen.”... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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WILDERNESS

The wilderness in dreams refers to the place where wild emotions and uncontrolled urges and drives reign, and suggests coming to terms with them.

The wilderness, in addition to the so-called jungle characteristics, may also indicate a desert, meaning unproductive or unused talents within the Self.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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WILL

An attempt to bring order into one’s affairs, gaining perspective about life already lived. Fear of death. Hoping for wealth without working for it. Coming to terms with a legacy, often in the sense of the dreamer’s own past, talents, and abilities.

The search for meaning.

A desire for productivity and fulfillment, particularly after one period in life has come to an end.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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