type

The meaning of Type in dream | Dream interpretation


To see type in a dream, portends unpleasant transactions with friends.

For a woman to clean type, foretells she will make fortunate speculations which will bring love and fortune.

Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation | Gustavus Hindman Miller

1. Communication and ability to express feelings.

2. A message from one level of consciousness to another.

3. A feeling that a mat­ter is of great importance (to note a typeface).

4. Wordplay denot­ing a tendency to categorize or “stereotype,” usually individuals.

New American Dream Dictionary | Joan Seaman - Tom Philbin


Dream Type | Dream Interpretation

The keywords of this dream: Type


ARCHETYPES

Although the word archetype has a long history, Carl Jung used it to express something he observed in human dreams. He said the archetypes are a tendency or instinctive trend in the human unconscious to represent certain motifs or themes. As our instinctive urge to reproduce may show itself in consciousness as sexual fantasies, so archetypes show themselves as cenain dream, fantasy, or story themes. Just as each individual animal does not create its own instincts, we do not create our own collective thought pattern.

The influ­ence these archetypes have upon our conscious self is varied. Panly they are supportive, as instincts are to an animal.

Some ancient cultures erected a pantheon of gods and god­desses. Many of these gods were expressions of archetypal themes, such as death, rebirth and womanhood.

A sheepdog has in itself, unconsciously, a propensity to herd animals un­der direction. Through the worship of gods, perhaps ancient people touched similar reservoirs of strength and healing. Without such, the individual might find it mcre difficult to face the fact that death waits at the end of their life, or to allow sexuality to emerge into their life at pube ty.

The dream of a girl suffering from anorexia shows her cutting off her own breasts with scissors. Here her developing sexual traits and urges are unacceptable to her. Perhaps she ‘cuts them off’ by not eating, thus preventing her body and psyche from matur­ing. In the past it would have been recommended that she give offerings to a goddess, thus aligning her with an uncon­scious power to adapt and mature.

Some of these archetypal patterns of behaviour, such as territorialism and group identity, are only too obviously be­hind much that occurs in war, and their influence needs to be brought more fully into awareness. But we must be careful in accepting Jung s descnption of the archetypes. In more recent years, through the tremendously amplified access to the un­conscious made possible in psychiatry through such drugs as LSD, a lot more information about unconscious imagery has been made available.

It is possible thai certain synthesising aspects of the mind produce images to represent huge areas of collected experience, i.e. the Mystic Mother or Madonna rep­resenting our collected experience of our mother.

Whatever may be the explanation of these archetypal themes, they are imponant because they illustrate how we as individuals, and as human beings collectively, have been able to develop^ur sense of conscious identity amidst enormous forces of unconsciousness, collectivity and external stresses. Below are some common archetypal symbols and their associ­ated images. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

ARCHETYPES

1- Archetypes are basic pictures that each of us hold deep within our subconscious. They are in a sense ‘psychic’ blueprints. These blueprints while potentially perfect can become distorted by- childhood experiences, socialisation and even parental experience.

C G Jung began studying archetypes and dividing function into thinking, feeling, sensation and intuition. Following various work by his pupils, it became possible to build up a type of ‘map’ of the interaction between all of these functions and to discover where one’s own distortions occur. Each function has a ‘positive’ and ‘negative’ quality which is perhaps better described as ‘greater’ and ‘lesser’. Each of the masculine and feminine sides of the personality has these four functions, thus there are 64 (8 x 8) interactions possible. Where a distortion has occurred, we tend to project onto those around us the archetype with which we have most difficulty (often the Shadow). Consequently there will be a tendency to repeat situations over and over (e.g. the woman who continually finds herself in close relationships with a father-figure type, or the man who continuallv finds himself at odds with women executives) until we learn how to cope with and understand our distortion.

The obverse of this is that, with awareness, one is able to accept other’s projections onto oneself without being affected bv them. Perfect balance would be achieved by using all aspects of the personality as shown below. Kindly Father and Mother are self explanatory. Ogre represents masculine anger used negatively and Destructive Mother may be wilfully destructive, or simply the smothering type that is the mother who prevents the adequate growth of her children. Youth and Princess are the more gentle, fun-loving aspects of the personality while Tramp is the eternal wanderer and Siren is the seductress or sexually active part of femininity. Hero is the self- sufficient Messianic part of the personality, while Amazon is the ‘self-sufficient’ female the efficient business woman type. Villain is the masculine part of the self who uses power for his own ends, while Competitor is die typical ‘women’s libber’ who feels that she has 110 need for men. Priest and Priestess are the powers of intuition used for the ‘greater good’, while Sorcerer uses inner power totally dispassionately and Witch uses that same power rather more emotionally and perhaps negatively.

2- More specifically the feminine archetypes arc:

Kindly Mother

This is the conventional picture of the caring mother figure, forgiving transgression and always understanding. Because much has been made of this side of femininity, until recently it was very easy to overdevelop this aspect at the expense of other sides of the personality. Destructive Mother This woman may be the ‘smothermother’ type or the frankly destructive, prohibitive mother. Often it is this aspect who either actively prevents or because of her effect on the dreamer causes difficulty in other relationships. Princess The fun-loving, innocent childlike aspect of femininity. She is totally spontaneous, but at the same time has a subjective approach to other people. Siren This type is the seductress, the sexually and sensually aware woman who still has a sense of her own importance. In dreams she often appears in historic, flowing garments as though to highlight the erotic image.

Amazon

The self-sufficient woman who feels she docs not need the male: often becomes the career woman. She enjoys the cut and thrust of intellectual sparring. Competitor - She is the woman who competes with all and sundry both men and women - in an effort to prove that she is able to control her own life. Priestess - This is the highly intuitive woman who has learnt to control the flow of information and use it for the common good. She is totally at home within the inner world.

Witch

The intuitive woman using her energy to attain her own perceived ends. She is subjective in her judgement and therefore loses her discernment.

The masculine archetypes are: Kindly Father This side of the masculine is the conventional kindly father figure who is capablc of looking after the child in us. but equally of being firm and fair. Ogre This represents the angry; overbearing, aggressive and frightening masculine figure. Often this image has arisen because of the original relationship the dreamer had with their father or father figure.

Youth

The fun-loving, curious aspect of the masculine is both sensitive and creative. This is the ‘Peter Pan’ figure who has never grown up.

Tramp

This is the real freedom lover, the wanderer, the gypsy. He owes no allegiance to anyone and is interested only in what lies around the next corner. Hero The hero is the man who has clcctcd to undertake his own journey of exploration. He is able to consider options and decide his next move. Often he appears as the Messianic figure in dreams. He will rescue the damsel in distress, but only as part of his growth proccss.

Villain

The villain is completely selfishly involved, not caring who he tramples on in his own search. He is often the aspect of masculinity women first meet in everyday relationships, so can remain in dream images as a threatening figure if she has not come to terms with his selfishness.

Priest

The intuitive man is the one who recognises and understands the power of his own intuition, but who usually uses it in the services of his god or gods. He may appear in dreams as the Shaman or Pagan priest.

Sorcerer

This is the man who uses discernment in a totallv dis- passionate way for neither good nor evil, but simply because he enjoys the use of power. In his more negative aspect he is the Trickster or Master of unexpected change.

3- Spiritually, when we have access to all the archetypes, we are ready to become integrated and whole.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

ARCHETYPES

A number of archetypes come up in dreams again and again.

Mother image: including grandmothers, stepmothers, mother-in-laws, midwives, wise women, goddesses, the Church, universities, towns, countries, heaven, earth, oceans, fields, gardens, springs, baptismal vessels, the womb, ovens, cooking pots, cows, rabbits. All these symbols stand for childhood memories, emotional connection to our mothers, difficulties in growing up, our own character traits, and more.

Serpent biting its aum tail: conscience and ego are in need of reconciliation (this is a reference to the fundamental struggle all human beings face—the polarities of good and evil, men and women, etc.).

Mandala: this symbol of circles and quadrants represent self-realization.... Dreamers Dictionary

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Dreamers Dictionary

ARCHETYPES

Collective unconscious’ is the term Carl Jung used to describe the part of the unconscious that everyone has access to, a sort of psychic storehouse for all humankind.

The contents of this storehouse are called ‘archetypes’: patterns and symbols that can be found within the unconscious of everyone. These archetypes represent the broad human memory within each of us. They appear as mythical images that occur in every culture throughout recorded history—the images appearing in the dreams of our ancestors are those that speak to us today.

According to Jung, dreams are attempts to guide the waking self. He thought that the purpose of life—and for him, dreams play an important role in it is to understand and integrate all parts of ourselves; dreams are simply one aspect of the self trying to communicate with the conscious part. Dreams don’t disguise the unconscious, they reveal it, through archetypes.

Sigmund Freud disagreed with Jung, as he believed that dreams were disguised attempts to hide, not reveal, true feelings from the waking mind. Freud did, however, recognize a concept of ‘archaic remnants’, inherited—rather than learned—beliefs, through which basic emotions and responses are represented.

For example, the mother figure is a universal symbol of nurturing and protection.

Today, most dream researchers believe that we are more likely to see archetypal figures in our dreams at transition points in our lives than at other, more stable times. Change generally brings about anxiety and self-reflection. Going from education to the workforce, singlehood to marriage, or childless to parent are some typical archetypal transitions. Many of these archetypes are very familiar to us already, because they can be found in myths, legends, fairy tales, books and movies: the wicked stepmother, the authoritative father and the vulnerable maiden. We are as familiar with the superhero in films like Spiderman or Batman, as we are with the character of the dastardly joker or villain. All these characters are archetypes, and enduring representations of basic human qualities, instincts and experiences.

The first step in analysing an archetype, as with any symbol, is through personal reference. For example, a dream about monsters may refer to our inner fears, but it may also be a carry-over from the horror film you watched the same night. The next step is to take into consideration the other images in the dream, as well as the feelings and general atmosphere.

When archetypes appear in your dreams you will rarely feel indifferent to them and your instinctive response is crucial to the interpretation. Do they make you feel angry, inspired, sad, protective, frustrated or liberated? Never forget that such images spring from the deepest levels of the unconscious, and it is up to you to discover why they have been conjured up.

Jung contributed to our understanding of dream archetypes with constructs of his own, which some dream researchers find helpful in interpreting dreams. Although Jung believed that there is no fixed number of archetypes which we can simply list and memorize, he did believe that most archetypes are aspects of the following constructs: the persona, the anima and the animus, the ego, and the shadow. As you interpret your dreams you might want to consider these constructs along with the other archetypal images suggested in the pages of this book.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

ARCHETYPES

The archetypes listed here are just a few of the many ancient patterns that exist in human consciousness and manifest as symbolic figures, played by yourself or someone else, in your dreams. See also SYMBOLS.... The Element Encyclopedia

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The Element Encyclopedia

ARCHETYPES (ARCHETYPAL DREAM IMAGES)

While the notion of archetypes is at least as old as Plato, it is most familiar to the modern world through the work of Carl Jung, the prominent Swiss psychotherapist. In contrast to his mentor Sigmund Freud, Jung divided the unconscious mind into two subdivisions, the personal unconscious and the collective unconscious (which he also referred to as the objective psyche). The personal unconscious is shaped by our personal experiences, whereas the collective unconscious represents our inheritance of the collective experience of humankind. This storehouse of humanity’s experiences exists in the form of archetypes (or prototypes).

The archetypes predispose us to subconsciously organize our personal experiences in certain ways. We are, for instance, predisposed to perceive someone in our early environment as a father because of the father archetype. If a person’s biological father is absent during childhood, someone else (e.g., an older brother) is assimilated into this archetype, providing concrete images for the father complex (the reflection of the father archetype in the personal unconscious).

Archetypes are not specific images or symbols. They are more like invisible magnetic fields that cause iron filings to arrange themselves according to certain patterns. For example, Jung postulated the existence of a self archetype, which constitutes the unconscious basis for our ego—our conscious self-image or self-concept. In dreams, this self is represented in a variety of ways, often in the form of a circle or mandala (a circular diagram used as an aid to meditation in Hinduism and Buddhism). The self can also be represented by surrogate symbols, such as four of almost anything (according to Jung, four is the number of whole- ness and hence a symbol of the self), a pattern Jung referred to as a quaternity. These concrete manifestations of elusive archetypes are referred to as archetypal images or, when they appear in dreams, as archetypal dream images.

Jung asserted that much of world mythology and folklore represents manifestations of the collective unconscious. He based this assertion on his discovery that the dreams of his patients frequently contained images with which they were completely unfamiliar, but which seemed to reflect symbols that could be found somewhere in the mythological systems of world culture. Jung further found that if he could discover the specific meaning of such images in their native culture, he could better understand the dreams in which they occurred. The process of seeking such meanings is referred to as amplification.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

DIFFERENT TYPES OF DREAMS

“The interpretation of dreams is the real path to knowing the soul.”
SIGMUND FREUD

Clear and personalized messages Before jumping in to discover the hidden messages that filter into our dreams and appear in the dictionary in the second part, it’s best to keep in mind that not all oneiric thoughts can be analyzed with the same pattern. Therefore, psychologists and analysts distinguish between three classes of dreams:

  • Readjustment dreams
  • Satisfaction dreams
  • Premonitory dreams
In the interpretation of dreams, we work from the base knowledge that the same subject can have very different meanings depending on the circumstances and personal situation of the dreamer. Because of this, this dictionary offers abundant explanations (psychological and esoteric) from very distinct viewpoints, although the boundary is often blurred. This is meant to show the melting pot of possibilities for discovery and prediction if one atunes their sensitivity and perceptiveness in each interpretation. But back to this chapter, where we have compiled a series of recurring themes as examples, and touch on erotic dreams, another way in which the subconscious offers information to be analyzed. Although these belong in the group of satisfaction dreams, their details warrant a separate explanation. Readjustment dreams In this type of dream, the oneiric images are provoked by merely physical causes. Readjustment dreams can be of internal origins—that is, generated by the body due to factors such as indigestion or a headache—or of external origin—heat, noises, the feel of sheets on the body, etc. A typical example of a readjustment dream with external origin would be that of a person who, due to the weight of the blankets, dreams of carrying a heavy load. Where do these types of images come from? It’s simple: when we close our eyes, we have the sensation of being isolated from the world because our consciousness of the exterior world is so linked to visual perception. However, the other senses remain in contact with the world. Therefore, even though when we sleep we appear to lose consciousness, this information continues to be collected in the brain (this is why loud noises wake us up). This is why we prefer darkness and quiet to sleep. However, we can’t always control our surroundings. When situations arise out of our control (the sound of a siren, a change in temperature, etc.), these sensory impressions become integrated in our dreams and can take surprising forms. Abraham Lincoln, president of the United States, dreamt of his own death by assassination. Premonitory dreams
These oneiric episodes dream of something that will become reality in the future. In the majority of cases, these are negative dreams that tend to warn of a coming danger. As a paradigmatic example of premonition, take that of Abraham Lincoln, president of the United States, in 1865. A few days before being assassinated, Lincoln saw his own death in one of his dreams. Even though this mythical case of the US president indicates the opposite, let us be clear that dreaming of a death does not necessarily imply that a tragic event is imminent.

In these dreams, death can mean many different things; for example, some psychologists interpret it as marking the end of a life cycle. This is why we insist on the importance of personalizing the dream interpretation.

Be that as it may, premonitions tend to be hidden in a symbolism that is difficult to decode, since it does not refer to past experiences. They are messages that try to warn us of dangers that face us on the physical or emotional plane. For this reason, eastern cultures have always valued them highly, as we will see later on. Satisfaction dreams Satisfaction dreams constitute the basis for the main theories of oneiric interpretation. They deal with those images in which we fulfill the desires that we cannot satisfy while awake. Therefore, this huge category includes everything from erotic dreams to the worst nightmares. In some cases, a certain satisfaction dream may repeat for years. This means that the person’s subconscious is warning them of the importance of something they may be trying to ignore. The part of this book dedicated to interpretation refers to this type of dreams.

Sexual dreams are not necessarily the result of accumulated sexual tension that needs to be released, but rather they usually refer to inner conflicts and hidden needs, or a desire to enjoy sex more freely.
Sexual dreams There are dreams that have the capacity to excite us, intrigue us, make us tremble, embarrass us . . . These are the ones that we never, or almost never, share with others. These are erotic dreams that, generally speaking, have nothing to do with the social or sexual conduct of our waking lives.

“Dreams manifest the desires that our consciousness does not express.” Sigmund Freud

Erotic dreams join other sensations that, in waking life, we probably wouldn’t relate immediately with sex. Therefore, these dreams, which could be violent, passionate, perverse, romantic, etc., tend to refer to inner conflicts and hidden emotional needs. Therefore they belong to the classification of satisfaction dreams.

On some occasions, they reveal a fear of intimacy or warn against certain relationships. In others, they illustrate situations and behaviors that we cannot normally exhibit. The dream represents everything through symbols or a strong sexual connotation. Its themes and languages, often dark, can confuse us or make us doubt because each individual has their personal symbols (just like with other types of dreams). It’s interpretation, therefore, should be performed according to the situation of the individual.

Dreams are escape routes for sexual impulses that social conventions repress; in erotic dreams everything seems permissible, so they are the best way to bring our most secret emotional desires to light. For Sigmund Freud, dreams manifested the desires that our consciousness does not express, and that was all.

Dreams contain valuable information about ourselves. But their meaning is often far from what it seems.

On occasion, erotic dreams illustrate situations and behaviors that we can’t experience in real life, whether it is due to social convention or our own beliefs. These sexual dreams act as an escape route for repressed impulses.
Therefore, it’s important to pay attention to them because they contain valuable information about ourselves. However, their meaning is often far from what it seems. They may just as well symbolize tension in our daily lives as the desire to have a good time. Erotic dreams and fantasies Erotic dreams are also related to a person’s physical and emotional development. During puberty, for example, these kinds of dreams are very common. Others that are more unpleasant are related to episodes of abuse or sexual assault. In some form or another, almost everyone has had some type of erotic dreams because at the end of the day, they are natural occurrences that are part of our lives.

They deserve our time and attention. For example, it’s important to discover when they refer to sexual issues and when they refer to other aspects, because erotic dreams often bring us valuable clues about intimacy with a partner. If something is not right in the relationship, they probably indicate the path to resolution. There should not be any difference between the erotic dreams of men and women, just between different people. However, various studies done in the United States have demonstrated the opposite. While women usually have erotic dreams with someone they know and go all the way from flirting to coitus, men dream of anonymous kinky women that succumb to their fantasies. Obviously this is not always the case, but it is undeniable that a personal relationship is highly valued in the feminine psyche. The masculine, on the other hand, opts for pleasure and domination.

The education one has received, the latent sexism of the collective subconscious, and that of the media are all factors that dreams cannot bypass. These dreams can provoke even decisive, strong women to feel more vulnerable during dreams. Fortunately, as our customs are changing, the dissimilarities between masculine and feminine erotic dreams are gradually shrinking.

Finally, erotic dreams, like all dreams, can hide fears, anxieties, and needs that you repress due to inhibitive situations or a lack of time to face the problem. With the interpretation of erotic dreams, we can find many clues to understand our emotions better.

While men dream of anonymous kinky women succumbing to their fantasies, women usually dream of erotic encounters with men they know.
Dreams of duality: masculine-feminine
Dreams of duality are those that refer to our double identity: masculine and feminine. These dreams translate the union of our two elements: animus and anima, two notions defined by Jung that appear constantly in dreams. The majority of these oneiric episodes are characterized by the denial or rejection of one of the two parts of our being—and what each one represents—creating a tension or internal conflict that can even show through in our personality. In order to help us regain balance, the dream tries to make us understand how and why we’ve forgotten the other side of ourselves.

In this way, when a man dreams that he is a woman, the message is not necessarily about a conflict of identity or sexuality; more likely it refers to a lack of attention to the more sensitive, intuitive side of his personality. Equally, when a woman sees herself as a man in her dreams, her subconscious may be appealing to her more energetic and rational side.

Dreams in which the left (feminine) or right (masculine) side of our bodies are hurt or immobilized (for example, an arm or leg) warn us that we are repressing or denying our masculine or feminine development. It is difficult for us to accept our duality and we reject this aspect that we don’t know how to express. Dreams of houses
The great oneirologist of ancient times, Artemidorus of Ephesus (second century BC) said: “The home is us”; and the most recent research on oneiric content confirms it. Buildings in our dreams are a reflection of our personality. Therefore you must pay attention to all the details that appear, which give you reliable hints about your desires, fears, worries . . . Each place and element of the house refers to a personal aspect of the self; the kitchen represents our spiritual or intellectual appetite; the oven is the alchemic place of transformation; the basement represents the accumulation of riches; the bedroom, conjugal difficulties, etc.

However, dreams in which different rooms appear can also refer to different areas of real life. If, for example, you find yourself cooking in a kitchen, it may be a reference to a plan that you are “cooking up” in real life. If you find yourself locked in a dark basement, perhaps you feel guilty about something and think you deserve a punishment. Lying in a bed or on a sofa can be a sign that you need a break from your exhausting daily routine.

When the doors of the dream house are shut tight or covered with brick, or there are signs on doors to the rooms prohibiting entry, you should ask yourself what is blocking your evolution in real life. It may be part of your own personality or some basic inhibition.

The buildings in our dreams are a reflection of our personality. “The Splash” (David Hockney, 1966).
Many people dream that they discover new rooms in houses that they know well. In general, this points to unknown aspects of their personality that are about to come out; but it can also indicate that they are ready for a new intellectual challenge.

The feelings that emerge when we find ourselves inside an oneiric building are very significant. If you feel brave and curious while exploring every nook and cranny of the house, it means that you are not afraid of what you may discover about yourself, you act assuredly, and face your problems with confidence. On the other hand, if you feel afraid it is a sign of inhibition and insecurity.

A pleasant, organized room reflects mental order and spiritual serenity. If it doesn’t have windows, it is a sign of isolation, fear, and insecurity. “La habitacion” (“The Room”) (Van Gogh, 1889).
Nightmares and anxious dreams Nightmares are terrifying dreams that usually stay in our minds when we wake up. They usually occur during the REM phase and, on occasion, are so distressing that they wake you up and torment you for a few minutes. The fear is often accompanied by cold sweats, dry mouth, heart palpitations . . . and the sensation of having lived a terrible moment.

Sometimes, traumatic events that happen to us in waking life (an accident, a robbery, a sexual assault) revisit us in dreams. Our mind needs to free the tension caused by the event and it does it while our consciousness rests.

Worry dreams reflect subconscious doubts and fears about events in our lives that have been saved in our minds but not our conscious memory.
These dreams typically disappear with time. If they persist, it may be a major trauma that requires professional help or, at least, and understanding friend to listen; talking about it is the first step to overcoming it.

Many cultures share the belief that nightmares are nothing more than malignant spirits that attack their victims in their sleep with terrifying thoughts. Some research on oneiric content concludes that these scary dreams are more common in childhood, and if they persist into adulthood it usually indicates a deeply rooted problem.

Research in sleep laboratories has demonstrated that often nightmares are triggered by a sudden noise, which detonates a distressing oneiric image. Therefore, for people who suffer from frequent nightmares, it is advisable to wear earplugs. Worry dreams
Dreams in which we feel worried about something are more frequent than nightmares, and sometimes the pressure we feel to resolve a problem in the dream wakes us up. Once awake, the oneiric worry may seem trivial compared to our real problems, however we should not ignore the importance of these dreams; their analysis will reveal areas of our lives that require attention or make us insecure.

Worry dreams reflect subconscious doubts and fears about events in our lives that have been saved in our minds but not our conscious memory. They deal with minor preoccupations that we haven’t consciously given attention to, but our subconscious has recognized.

According to Freud, dreams that generate anxiety or worry are the result of trying to repress an emotion or desire, usually sexual. Freud also highlighted the importance of finding the source of that worry in waking life, since these worries left unattended can degenerate into worse traumas.

To analyze this type of dream you must pay attention to all the elements that appear in the episode, since it is symbolically giving you hints about what worries us.

Dreams about angels are usually messages of inner exploration. In some oneiric episodes they appear as spiritual guides and protectors that try to show us a path.
Dreams of inner exploration: forgotten babies and angels
Dreams in which forgotten babies or angels appear are very common, and meaningful for our personal and spiritual evolution. But what is the meaning of this baby that screams to be held and fed? It represents, symbolically, the spiritual seed inside of us that has been left to languish without nourishment. This sacred seed, the divine Self, the “philosophical child,” as the alchemists said. It has trusted us and we must help it grow.

Dreams about angels or spiritual entities tend to be messages of inner exploration. We see various examples collected in an “office of dreams.”

“I am in utter darkness. I am surrounded by silence and emptiness. Suddenly, a shape appears, white and slender, pure, almost surreal. The features of the face are erased. A pure oval, the svelte body, without a definable sex. There is only the impression of extreme sweetness and deep harmony; but this character causes me such an impression of abandonment that it seems like a cry for help. I wrap it in my arms and want to save it at all costs.”

This is a dream of protections, of contact with the invisible world. In this oneiric episode, the androgynous character is recognized as angelic. This fabulous vision is none other than the person’s angel showing him his ailment, found in the darkness.

In other dreams, angels appear as spiritual guides or personal guardians:

The cartoons of “Little Nemo” (Winsor McCay, 1905) always ended with the images of Nemo falling out of bed. His incredible stories revolved around his fascinating dreams.

“I had died on a golden carriage decorated with blue velvet; to my right, a feminine angel, all white, smiled at me . . . she held before me the reins of two white horses, while ahead of us, an unending path bathed in sunlight opened to us.” Travel dreams
One of the most pleasant and stimulating oneiric experiences is traveling to a far-off place and waking up with the sensation of having returned from a great vacation. Without a doubt, this often means a deep desire to travel that you have not been able to satisfy; but it can also hold other interesting readings.

On occasion, you remember precise details about places and settings you have never been to. This could be due to photographs, movies, or television reports that you’ve seen and that your subconscious has saved for some special reason.

These journeys coincide, sometimes, with moment in real life when we are about to begin something new (a change of job or location . . .). Just as the landscape and feelings of the dream can indicate our real emotions about this change, the circumstances of the trip are also revealing. If it is a bumpy trip in which it is difficult to get to your destination (because you lost the tickets or bags, or crashed the car . . .), the dream may be encouraging you to weigh the pros and cons of the situation, and warning you about obstacles ahead. Perhaps you are not mentally prepared for the change.

On the other hand, dreams about remote and exotic places are warning you that your lifestyle is claustrophobic and repressed, and that you need a change or to broaden your horizons.

The mode of transportation that you use to travel in the dream is very significant. If you travel in plane, for example, you should ask yourself if you have your feet firmly on the ground or, on the contrary, if you feel more comfortable “in the clouds.” Escapism in real life tends to appear symbolically in travel dreams. Trains are symbols of new and exciting opportunities; missing the train or letting it leave is a clear symbol of a fear of change—and the insecurity that goes along with this. The station, or point of departure, is a symbolic place of transformation. The predicament of not having a ticket or money to buy one is related to some type of deficiency. However, if you manage to arrive at the destination despite it all, the dream is reflecting a certain amount of self satisfaction.

Surrealism was a revolution. The world of the oneiric, the subconscious, the paranoid . . . become a new way of seeing and exploring life. Its influence is still seen today.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

DREAM TYPES

“I can never decide whether my dreams are a result of my thoughts, or my thoughts the result of my dreams. It is very queer. But my dreams make conclusions for me. They decide things finally. I dream a decision.”
D. H. Lawrence

Just as there are different types of music—classical, rock, jazz—there are different kinds of dreams. Although different types of dream can blend and merge, modern dream researchers tend to break dream types into the following categories:

AMPLIFYING DREAMS
These can exaggerate certain situations or life attitudes in order to point them out sharply for the dreamer. For example, someone who is very shy may dream that they have become invisible.

ANTICIPATING DREAMSThese are dreams that may alert us to possible outcomes in situations in our waking life; for example, passing or failing an exam.

CATHARTIC DREAMS
Such dreams evoke extremely emotional reactions, when the unconscious is urging us to relieve pent-up feelings we may feel unable to express in waking life. For example, you may find yourself bursting into tears on a packed commuter train in your dreams, or you might punch your irritating neighbor or tell your boss exactly what you think of him or her.

CONTRARY OR COMPENSATORY DREAMS
In these types of dreams, the unconscious places the dreaming self in a totally different situation to the one we find ourselves in waking life. For example, if your day has been filled with unhappiness and stress due to the death of a loved one or the end of a relationship, you may dream of yourself spending a carefree, happy day by the seaside. Your unconscious may also give you personality traits that you haven’t expressed in waking life. For example, if you hate being the center of attention you may dream about being a celebrity. Such dreams are thought to provide necessary balance and may also be suggesting to you that you try incorporating some of the characteristics that your dream underlined in your waking life.

DAILY PROCESSING DREAMS
Also known as factual dreams, daily processing dreams are dreams in which you go over and over things that happened during the day, especially those that were repetitive or forced you to concentrate for long periods; dreaming about a long journey or a tough work assignment, for example. These kinds of dreams don’t tend to be laden with meaning, and most dream theorists think of them as bits and pieces of information your brain is processing.

DREAMS OF CHILDHOOD
Dreaming about your childhood may reflect a childhood dynamic which hasn’t been worked out yet and requires a resolution.

FALSE AWAKENING
It is thought that many reported sightings of ghosts are caused by false awakening, which occurs when you are actually asleep but are convinced in your dream state that you are awake. This is the kind of vivid dream in which you wake up convinced that what happened in your dream really happened.

INCUBATED DREAMS
This is when you set your conscious mind on experiencing a particular kind of dream. For example, you may incubate a dream of a loved one by concentrating on visualizing your loved one’s face before you sleep, or you may ask for a dream to answer your problems immediately before going to sleep. The theory is that your unconscious responds to the suggestion.

INSPIRATIONAL DREAMS
Many great works of art, music, literature have allegedly been inspired by dreams, when the unconscious brings a creative idea to the fore. For example, English poet and artist William Blake said that his work was inspired by the visions in his dreams. One night in 1816, Mary Shelley, her husband and a group of friends were challenged to write a ghost story. That night Mary Shelley dreamed of a creature that would later become the monster created by Dr Frankenstein in her yet-to-be-written novel.

LUCID DREAMS
These occur when you become aware that you are dreaming when you are dreaming. It takes time and practice to stop yourself waking up, but it is possible to learn how to become a lucid dreamer and control the course of your dreams.

MUTUAL DREAMS
When two people dream the same dream. Such dreams can be spontaneous or incubated, when two people who are close decide on a dream location together and imagine themselves meeting up before going to sleep.

NIGHTMARES
Dreams that terrify us or cause distress in some way by waking us up before the situation has resolved. Nightmares occur during REM sleep and typically arise when a person is feeling anxious or helpless in waking life. Once the dreamer has recognized what is triggering this kind of dream, and worked through any unresolved fears and anxieties, nightmares tend to cease.

NIGHT TERRORS
These are similar to nightmares, but because they occur in deep sleep (stage four) we rarely remember what terrified us, although we may be left with a lingering feeling of unexplained dread.

OUT-OF-BODY EXPERIENCES
Also known as astral travel or projection, out-of-body experiences are thought to occur at times of physical and emotional trauma. Researchers tend to dismiss the idea but those that experience such dreams say that their mind, consciousness or spirit leaves their body and travels through time and space.

PAST-LIFE DREAMS
If you dream of being in a historical setting some believe this is evidence of past-life recall, although most dream theorists dismiss the existence of past-life or far-memory dreams, or genetic dreams when you assume the identity of an ancestor.

PHYSIOLOGICAL DREAMS
These dreams reflect the state of your body, so, for example, if you have an upset stomach, you may dream that you are being violently sick. These dreams may highlight the progress of serious physical conditions or in some cases predict the onset of them.

PRECOGNITIVE DREAMS
Most dream researchers dismiss these dreams but precognitive dreams are thought to predict real-life events of which the dreamer has no conscious awareness. These dreams tend to happen to people with psychic abilities. They are extremely rare but there have been many instances when people claim to have dreamt of things before they happened. For example, many people reported dreaming about 9/11 before it occurred. Other people tell of cancelling trains or flights because of a foreboding dream. There are also reports of people who dreamt the winning numbers of the lottery.

PROBLEM-SOLVING DREAMS
These occur when you have gone to bed mulling over a problem and found the answer in your dreams. This could be because your unconscious has already solved the dream and sleeping on it gives your unconscious a chance to express itself. Many famous inventions were allegedly prompted by a dream. For example, Scottish engineer and inventor of the steam engine James Watt (1736- 1819) dreamed of molten metal falling from the sky in the shape of balls. This dream gave him the idea for drop cooling and ball-bearings. The model of the atom, the M9 analogue computer, the isolation of insulin in the treatment of diabetes, and, as we have seen, the sewing machine, were also ideas that sprung from inspiration in dreams.

PSYCHOLOGICAL DREAMS
These are dreams that bring things we would rather not think about to our attention. They make us face an aspect of ourselves or our life that might be hindering our progress. They are often about our fears, anxieties, resentment, guilt and insecurities. For example, if you dream of yourself running around and around on the wheel of a cage unable to stop, this could suggest that in your waking life you are taking on too much and not giving yourself enough time to relax.

RECURRING DREAMS
Dreams that reoccur typically happen when the dreamer is worried about a situation that isn’t resolving itself in waking life. When the trigger in waking life is dealt with the dreams usually end. Recurring dreams can also occur when a person is suffering from some kind of phobia or trauma that has been repressed or not resolved. If this is the case the unconscious is urging the dreamer to consciously receive and acknowledge the issue and deal with it.

SEXUAL DREAMS
In dreams, sex can reflect the archetypal pattern which underlies the waking sex life or may represent a hoped-for reunion with another part of ourselves into a whole.

TELEPATHIC DREAMS
This is the kind of dream when someone you know appears in your dream in acute distress and you later learn that that person was experiencing a real-life crisis at the time, such as extreme unhappiness, an accident or even death. It is thought that telepathic dreams are a meeting of minds between two people who are close to each other emotionally.

VIGILANT DREAMS
These are processing dreams that involve your senses. For example, if your mobile rings or a picture falls to the ground while you are asleep, the sound may be incorporated into your dream but appear as something else, such as a police siren or a broken window. The smell of flowers in your room may also become a garden scene in your dreams.

WISH-FULFILLMENT DREAMS
These are the kind of dreams in which we quite literally live the dream; we might win the lottery, date a celebrity, ooze charisma or simply go on a long holiday. In these kinds of dreams our unconscious is trying to compensate for disappointment or dissatisfaction with our current circumstances in waking life.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

TYPES OF DREAMS

Daydreams
Studies show that we all have the tendency to daydream an average of 70-120 minutes a day. Day dreaming is classified as a level of consciousness between sleep and wakefulness. It occurs during our waking hours when we let our imagination carry us away. As our minds begin to wander and our level of awareness decreases, we lose ourselves in our imagined scenario and fantasy.

Lucid Dreams
Lucid dreams occur when you realize you are dreaming. “Wait a second. This is only a dream!” Most dreamers wake themselves up once they realize that they are only dreaming. Other dreamers have cultivated the skill to remain in the lucid state of dreaming. They become an active participant in their own dreams, making decisions in their dreams and influencing the dream’s outcome without awakening.

Nightmares
A nightmare is a disturbing dream that causes the dreamer to wake up feeling anxious and frightened. Nightmares may be a response to real life trauma and situations. This type of nightmare falls under a special category called Post-traumatic Stress Nightmare (PSN).

Nightmares may also occur because we have ignored or refused to accept a particular life situation. Research shows that most people who have regular nightmares have had a family history of psychiatric problems, bad drug experiences, people who have contemplated suicide, and/or rocky relationships.

Nightmares are an indication of a fear that needs to be acknowledged and confronted. It is a way for our subconscious to make up take notice. “Pay attention!” We’ll have more later in the book about nightmares and steps you can take to overcome them.

Recurring Dreams
Recurring dreams repeat themselves with little variation in story or theme. These dreams may be positive, but most often they are nightmarish in content. Dreams may recur because a conflict depicted in the dream remains unresolved or ignored. Once you have found a resolution to the problem, your recurring dreams will cease.

Healing Dreams
Healing dreams serve as messages for the dreamer in regards to their health. Many dream experts believe that dreams can help us avoid potential health problems and help us to heal when we are ill. Our bodies are able to communicate to us through our dreams to “tell” us that something is not quite right with our bodies even before any physical symptoms show up. Dreams of this nature may be telling the dreamer that he/she needs to go to the dentist or doctor

Prophetic Dreams
Prophetic dreams also referred to as precognitive or psychic dreams are dreams that seemingly foretell the future. One rational theory to explain this phenomenon is that our dreaming mind is able to piece together bits of information and observation that we normally overlook or that we do not seriously consider. In other words, our unconscious mind knows what is coming before we consciously piece together the same information.

Signal Dreams
Signal dreams help you how to solve problems or make decisions in your waking life.

Epic Dreams
Epic dreams (or Great dreams) are so huge, so compelling, and so vivid that you cannot ignore them. The details of such dreams remain with you for years, as if your dreamt it last night. These dreams possess much beauty and contain many archetypal symbology. When you wake up from such a dream, you feel that you have discovered something profound or amazing about yourself or about the world. It feels like a life-changing experience

You might be wondering what exactly is going on in your head when you dream.... Dreampedia

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Dreampedia

TYPES OF SNAKES

King Cobra in dream meaning:
A King Cobra could indicate that you are hypnotized by another person’s charm.

Garden snakes in dream meaning:
Garden snakes symbolize unfounded, irrational fears.

Vipers and rattlesnakes in dream meaning:
Vipers and rattlesnakes suggest worries over something or someone who is unhealthy for you.

Boa constrictor snakes in dream meaning:
Boa constrictor snakes indicate you are being choked, restricted or smothered by someone.

Coral snakes in dream meaning:
Coral snakes are about being internally conflicted over an issue or decision.... Dreams

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Dreams

TYPEWRITER

Preparing a message of importance... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

TYPEWRITER

1. A need or desire to communicate or improve commu­nications within specific relationships (note who is typing and to whom it is addressed).

2. Forward movement in business. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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New American Dream Dictionary

TYPEWRITER

Clanking on a typewriter whose keys get stuck may mean that you are holding on to an old method of doing business or communication tactics that no longer work.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

TYPEWRITER

If you dream of a typewriter, then you are romantic, idealistic and even nostalgic for days gone by. This dream can also be showing you that your communication style is rigid, old-fashioned, and out-moded. Consider that this dream may be telling you that it is time for you to learn a new way of expressing yourself.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Strangest Dream Explanations

TYPEWRITER

To see a typewriter in your dream, indicates that you need to open the lines of communication with someone in your life. Also see “Typing”, below.... My Dream Interpretation

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My Dream Interpretation

TYPEWRITER

If you dreamed of using one, it signifies a substantial step forward, unless it jammed or gave trouble, in which case it constitutes an obstacle dream, and its meaning depends on the outcome of the action.

Of course, if you are in the habit of using a typewriter, the dream probably has no significance.... The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

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The Complete Guide to Interpreting Your Dreams

TYPEWRITER

Means of communication and self-expression. Need to organize and verbalize thoughts and feelings.... The Dream Books Symbols

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The Dream Books Symbols

WADDING (CLOTH TYPE STUFFING)

To dream of using wadding in the loading of an old fashioned rifle means you are arming yourself against the hostile actions and words of others. When used in the filling of artistic work then it shows your creativity will be well rewarded.... Encyclopedia of Dreams

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Encyclopedia of Dreams



















































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